5,000 new German words added to Duden
Thread poster: Iza Szczypka

Iza Szczypka  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 19:29
English to Polish
+ ...
Jul 22, 2009

BBC news item: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/8163541.stm

The trend is hardly enjoyable for German translators, I suppose...icon_frown.gif


 

xxxPeter Manda
Local time: 13:29
German to English
+ ...
quite the opposite Jul 22, 2009

The new words are the spice that makes translation enjoyable. Probably even what will defeat CAT translation too.

 

Iza Szczypka  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 19:29
English to Polish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
I didn't mean vocabulary extension as such Jul 22, 2009

Only the fact that you seem in the need to know some English to understand German.

 

Rebekka Groß  Identity Verified
Local time: 18:29
English to German
Kreditklemme Jul 22, 2009

Living in the UK, I have lately wondered what "credit crunch" would be called in Germanicon_smile.gif

 

Steve Erpelding  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 19:29
French to German
+ ...
:) Jul 23, 2009

credit crunch (Bank, Vw, Fin) : Kreditknappheit f, Kreditrestriktion f

 

Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 19:29
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
+ ...
The words Jul 23, 2009

Iza Szczypka wrote:
Only the fact that you seem in the need to know some English to understand German.


The words would not have made it into the Duden if they weren't pretty well known by Germans as "German" already. So I guess for a German, those "English" words are simply German words.


 

Steffen Walter  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 19:29
Member (2002)
English to German
+ ...
Depends Jul 23, 2009

Samuel Murray wrote:
Iza Szczypka wrote:
Only the fact that you seem in the need to know some English to understand German.

The words would not have made it into the Duden if they weren't pretty well known by Germans as "German" already. So I guess for a German, those "English" words are simply German words.


Well, Samuel, as a native German, I believe this would very much depend on the specific case. Many of these English terms ("Anglizismen") have been borrowed blindly despite there being well-established German synonyms and are used with distorted meanings compared to the original (in many cases just to sound "trendy").

Steffen


 

Katrin Lueke  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 19:29
Member (2006)
English to German
public viewing and body bag Jul 23, 2009

Steffen Walter wrote:

Well, Samuel, as a native German, I believe this would very much depend on the specific case. Many of these English terms ("Anglizismen") have been borrowed blindly despite there being well-established German synonyms and are used with distorted meanings compared to the original (in many cases just to sound "trendy").

Steffen


For example public viewing and body bag.
The first was used everywhere during the football worldcup and European championship, even in the news. It meant "watching the football game together on big screens on public places".
The second is used for little bags you wear on your body to keep your money and passport safe when on holiday.
icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif


 

FarkasAndras
Local time: 19:29
English to Hungarian
+ ...
bags Jul 23, 2009

Katrin Lueke wrote:
body bags... little bags you wear on your body to keep your money and passport safe when on holiday.
icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif


Not bad!

In other news, do any native English speakers know what a "shopper" is?





Solution: Italians somehow got it into their heads that it is English for "plastic shopping bag".


 

Oliver Walter  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:29
Member (2005)
German to English
+ ...
Kreditkrise Jul 23, 2009

Rebekka Gross wrote:
Living in the UK, I have lately wondered what "credit crunch" would be called in Germanicon_smile.gif

In German-speaking Switzerland, TV news programmes call it Kreditkrise. It has the same Kr--Kr-- pattern of sound as the English (cr--cr--), but of course Krise doesn't have the same informality as crunch.
Oliver


 

Daina Jauntirans  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:29
German to English
+ ...
Leaves DE>EN translators scratching their heads Jul 24, 2009

Iza Szczypka wrote:

Only the fact that you seem in the need to know some English to understand German.


Except that if you're a native English speaker, many uses of English in German don't make sense. I sometimes have to ask customers what they actually mean when they sloppily use English in the middle of a German text, and often the answer is something very different from what the word or phrase would normally mean in English.

[Edited at 2009-07-24 15:59 GMT]

A good example is "Shooting" = photo shoot

[Edited at 2009-07-24 15:59 GMT]


 


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