Off topic: Interesting article about the English language
Thread poster: Amy Duncan
Amy Duncan  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 04:27
Portuguese to English
+ ...
Jan 2, 2010

From the New York Times:

www.nytimes.com/2010/01/01/books/01book.html?ref=books


Direct link Reply with quote
 

oxygen4u
Portugal
Local time: 07:27
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Interessante Jan 2, 2010

Obrigada Amy. É um artigo interessante, sobretudo agora que enfrentamos um Acordo Ortográfico...

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Oleksandr Kupriyanchuk  Identity Verified
Ukraine
Local time: 09:27
Russian to English
+ ...
The other "artigo" is even more "interessante" Jan 2, 2010

IMHO, an excerpt from " ‘The Lexicographer’s Dilemma` ", the entire book and other articles about the book are much more interesting than this article. The author of the Books of The Times is a good and selling copywriter, but... he does not seem to have read/properly understood all of the Lynch's writing.

However, the book itself is also (purposely) controversial. "To mangle the rules of grammar, you first have to know the rules" ?! I doubt this the most


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Spencer Allman
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:27
Finnish to English
Control Jan 3, 2010

I don't think the native English-speaking world is going to lose control for a long time. The reason is that, although certain ways of saying things among non-native English speakers may come to prominence, they are by no means universal. An example is the word 'branch', which many Europeans, when speaking English together, understand - wrongly - to mean 'field', 'sector' or 'industry', though in 'Japanese English' the word has the same meaning as in (normal) English ('office location').

The optimists who are lazy about learning the complexities of English (and they are legion) are kidding themselves if they think that in the future the world will be speaking a simplied version. Simplified languages do not work because they cannot accommodate all the messages humans need to convey (look at the failure of Esperanto).

And I am sure no one in the UK, the USA, Canada, New Zealand, Pakistan, Nigeria, Ghana, Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica, Singapore, etc.,etc., is going to adopt a sort of Startrek-alien's dialect to communicate with the rest of the world.

That is not to say, however, that the language is not changing. All languages change over time - that is a truism. 'Slower' is taking over from 'more slowly' and 'less' (oh abomonation!) is being used more and more for 'fewer'.

Cheers


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Interesting article about the English language

Advanced search






Anycount & Translation Office 3000
Translation Office 3000

Translation Office 3000 is an advanced accounting tool for freelance translators and small agencies. TO3000 easily and seamlessly integrates with the business life of professional freelance translators.

More info »
PerfectIt consistency checker
Faster Checking, Greater Accuracy

PerfectIt helps deliver error-free documents. It improves consistency, ensures quality and helps to enforce style guides. It’s a powerful tool for pro users, and comes with the assurance of a 30-day money back guarantee.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search