difference between usage: hours in a row/consecutive hours
Thread poster: Martina Pokupec

Martina Pokupec  Identity Verified
Croatia
Local time: 07:57
English to Croatian
+ ...
Jan 14, 2011

Hi,

I know this is a question for En>EN KudoZ, but I haven't got the option of asking there, since this is not my language combination.

I would like a native English speaker to tell me the difference between:

-working 8 consecutive hours, and
-working 8 hours in a row.

I need to use this phrase in a more formal, but not totally formal, register.

Personally, I would opt for "consecutive", because "hours in a row" seems to me more informal, but that is only how I perceive these phrases.

Thank you for your help in advance!

[Edited at 2011-01-14 15:23 GMT]


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Aude Sylvain  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 07:57
English to French
+ ...
KudoZ in other pairs Jan 14, 2011

Hello, I share your understanding re both wordings, but I am not a native.

This is simply to tell you that you can ask a KudoZ question in other pairs than yours: go to www.proz.com/ask/ and click on the tag "see more language pairs" that appears in red in the first box. This will give you access to two (source/target) full drop-down menus.


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Robert Forstag  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 01:57
Member (2003)
Spanish to English
+ ...
@Martina Jan 14, 2011

As a native speaker of US English, I can assure you that your understanding is indeed correct (and, as far as I know, there is no difference between US and UK English in this regard).

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Martina Pokupec  Identity Verified
Croatia
Local time: 07:57
English to Croatian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Hi Aude Jan 14, 2011

Aude Sylvain wrote:

Hello, I share your understanding re both wordings, but I am not a native.

This is simply to tell you that you can ask a KudoZ question in other pairs than yours: go to www.proz.com/ask/ and click on the tag "see more language pairs" that appears in red in the first box. This will give you access to two (source/target) full drop-down menus.



I have just learned that I can ask this in KudoZ, by putting EN>EN as my interest pair..

I will leave this question here, though, now that I have asked it, but will refer to KudoZ answerers with future inquiries.

Thank you!


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Katalin Horváth McClure  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 01:57
Member (2002)
English to Hungarian
+ ...
Martina, you can ask in ANY language pair Jan 14, 2011

You don't have to mark the pair as interest at all.
When you open up the KudoZ asking form,
http://www.proz.com/ask/
it will only show your own language pairs in the pull-down menu, but there is a small red text under it, saying "See more languages".
If you click on that, you can select any source and any target language.

Here is the direct link:
http://www.proz.com/ask.php/?sp=k2&all_langs=y


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Martina Pokupec  Identity Verified
Croatia
Local time: 07:57
English to Croatian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
thank you Jan 14, 2011

thank you all so much.

I feel embarrassed now, not to have explored it myself. Anyway, thanks for your help!


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Steffen Walter  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 07:57
Member (2002)
English to German
+ ...
Right, Katalin Jan 14, 2011

Katalin Horvath McClure wrote:

You don't have to mark the pair as interest at all.
When you open up the KudoZ asking form,
http://www.proz.com/ask/
it will only show your own language pairs in the pull-down menu, but there is a small red text under it, saying "See more languages".
If you click on that, you can select any source and any target language.

Here is the direct link:
http://www.proz.com/ask.php/?sp=k2&all_langs=y


You are right, Katalin - I hadn't considered this option, which is even more convenient.

Steffen


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neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 07:57
Spanish to English
+ ...
As Robert says Jan 15, 2011

... your understanding is good. The only real difference is in formality - "in a row" is more a spoken idiom than written.

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difference between usage: hours in a row/consecutive hours

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