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Does the word "plannable" exist?
Thread poster: Ana Resende

Ana Resende  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 07:49
German to Portuguese
+ ...
Jun 13, 2011

I've never heard such word. Does this word ('plannable') exist in English? Could you please provide some information about this?
Best,
Ana R.


 

apk12  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 12:49
English to German
+ ...
Visible, hearable, searchable, findable ;) Jun 13, 2011

When language users move around a bit and type enough, Oxford or Cambridge will list it soon.icon_wink.gif It already made its way to the http://www.dict.cc/englisch-deutsch/plannable.html

If you do not like the word, you should open your account there. Actually, at least re. the strange "time critical" case this helped a bit. Not enough yet, but a bit. (There were many people starting to localize it into German as indeed "zeitkritisch", which simply means something else than "time critical") - well. Stories.

Anyway: 2012, 2013 it might be in an official reference.


"buildable, developable, changeable, erectable, layable..."icon_wink.gif oh, and...:
plannable
http://www.proz.com/kudoz/spanish_to_english/management/2816411-planificable.html

(note for the record: june 13th 2011: 28.000 - just in order to observe and to update occasionally in case something interesting happens re "plannable")



[Edited at 2011-06-13 15:43 GMT]


 

Anton Konashenok  Identity Verified
Czech Republic
Local time: 12:49
English to Russian
+ ...
Why not? Jun 13, 2011

It's a perfectly valid word. Sorry, don't have an unabridged dictionary at hand to check whether it has been officially recognized; there isn't much use for it in everyday language, but I'd reckon it does have its place in executive or military jargon.

Speaking of "-able" words concocted on the spot, my favorite one was "take-apartable" (heard from a professor of the University of California, Berkeley).


 

Noni Gilbert  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 12:49
Spanish to English
+ ...
Well, they're using it in Guildford.... Jun 13, 2011

http://www.guildford.gov.uk/CHttpHandler.ashx?id=1994&p=0

It certainly smacks of being a new coinage, but it's already pretty entrenched; if you google it and focus on the pages written by native speakers you'll find numerous bona fide examples.

That which can be planned.... (and unplannable, that which can't).

We may not like all neologisms, but this one looks as if it's here to stay, isn't really dislodging any existing adjective, and doesn't pose any grammatical quandaries.

Go ahead and use it with confidence!


 

Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 12:49
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Yes! Jun 13, 2011

Plannable wood is wood you can process with a planer?icon_wink.gif

 

Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 12:49
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Bailable Jun 13, 2011

Anton Konashenok wrote:
Speaking of "-able" words concocted on the spot, my favorite one was "take-apartable" (heard from a professor of the University of California, Berkeley).

In Spain some people make the joke that at a disco, singles and unattached are "bailable" instead of "available". "Bailable" means "danceable".


 

apk12  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 12:49
English to German
+ ...
forgetitable Jun 13, 2011

ok, let's see. "targetable clients" for "plannable projects". then we have "remindable clients" (that's those who don't forget to remind their secretary of the follow-up-translation order over there on the desk), then the "rememberable clients" (that's those who prefer not to wait for their secretary but prefer to finally order themselves), and

and how to call now those clients who ask for free work in order to "increase your chances for further projects"?

the "forgetitable"?





[Edited at 2011-06-13 19:43 GMT]


 

James McVay  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 06:49
Russian to English
+ ...
Spelling... Jun 13, 2011

Tomás Cano Binder, CT wrote:

Plannable wood is wood you can process with a planer?icon_wink.gif


Uh, I think that would be spelled "planable."


 

Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 12:49
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
I know, I know! Jun 13, 2011

James McVay wrote:
Tomás Cano Binder, CT wrote:
Plannable wood is wood you can process with a planer?icon_wink.gif

Uh, I think that would be spelled "planable."

I know! I was just trying to make a joke. By the looks if it, I did not succeed!icon_smile.gif


 

apk12  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 12:49
English to German
+ ...
Planneraxe Jun 13, 2011

Never mind, Thomas. I am absolutely sure, earlier or later someone will get a tree down with a planer. And will write about his experience with that "plannable" typoicon_wink.gif

 

Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 12:49
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Awesome Jun 13, 2011

apk12 wrote:
Never mind, Thomas. I am absolutely sure, earlier or later someone will get a tree down with a planer. And will write about his experience with that "plannable" typoicon_wink.gif

Sounds like a good plann!icon_wink.gif


 

Rachel Fell  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:49
French to English
+ ...
Not particularly... Jun 13, 2011

From my G page: http://tinyurl.com/6dmla4z
(i.e. 1st hit is from the ger_eng dict. site)
Even like this it isn't much more convincing, though I think it can be OK in the right - or rather, in particular - contexts:
http://tinyurl.com/6x8eomk

[Edited at 2011-06-14 15:22 GMT]

[Edited at 2011-06-14 15:24 GMT]


 

Giles Watson  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 12:49
Italian to English
Plannable isn't inconceivable Jun 14, 2011

If you google "plannable" with a near synonym, such as "conceivable", you turn up all sorts of mainly scientific occurrences, such as this American publication from as long ago as 1953. This more recent UK site even has "plannability", which is inelegant but logical enough.

I would imagine that the term is not in standard dictionaries because it is (still?) regarded as jargon. It's also potentially polysemic - a bad thing in a scientific word - in that it could reasonably mean "that which we can actively incorporate into our plans" as well as "that for which we can/really ought to make provision for in our plans", which is how it seems to be used in practice.

Since there are plenty of near synonyms in ordinary speech (likely, expected, foreseeable or predictable, although plannable has a subtext of influenceable, manageable or in some measure controllable), I can't see much of a future for the term on the streets, unless it goes viral as a result of some er, "unplannable" contingency. After all, Jon Stewart might pick it up as a catchphrase on the Daily Show.


[Edited at 2011-06-14 13:52 GMT]


 

apk12  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 12:49
English to German
+ ...
viral 28.300 Jun 14, 2011

Giles Watson wrote:

...I can't see much of a future for the term on the streets, unless it goes viral as a result of some er, "unplannable" contingency. After all, Jon Stewart might pick it up as a catchphrase on the Daily Show.


Well, let's seeicon_wink.gif

Rachel Fell wrote:

From my G page: http://tinyurl.com/6dmla4z
...


note for the record: 28.300 on June 14th, 2011.

Rachel Fell wrote:
...
(i.e. 1st hit is from the ger_eng dict. site)


That's exactly why it helped to localize the possible source for the increasing number of hilarious "time critical">"zeitkritisch" in some localizations. In that case, it was the eng_ger hit nr.1 ("Zeitkritisch" means documentary, a bit similar to "socio-critical").



[Edited at 2011-06-14 13:42 GMT]


 

Gudrun Wolfrath  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 12:49
English to German
+ ...
It does. Jun 14, 2011

http://www.dict.cc/englisch-deutsch/plannable.html

 
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