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Thread poster: Tom in London

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:00
Member (2008)
Italian to English
Aug 11, 2011

interesting article on the newly identified linguistic phenomenon of the eggcorn:

http://tinyurl.com/42unmk8

examples:

"put the cat before the horse"

"a high-blown rhetorical style"

"Sarah Palin and her elk"


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Gilla Evans  Identity Verified
Local time: 13:00
Spanish to English
+ ...
Interesting article, Tom Aug 11, 2011

And I love the "Sarah Palin and her elk", made me laugh out loud!

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Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 14:00
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
+ ...
Pop etym Aug 11, 2011

Tom in London wrote:
Interesting article on the newly identified linguistic phenomenon of the eggcorn...


What would the difference be between eggcorns and popular etymology? Its the same thing, isn't it? I bet the eggcorn web site was started by a guy who discovered this phenomenon and couldn't figure out what the existing term was that we linguists use for it, so he coined a new one.


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Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:00
Member (2008)
Italian to English
TOPIC STARTER
eggcorns Aug 11, 2011

Samuel Murray wrote:

What would the difference be between eggcorns and popular etymology? Its the same thing, isn't it? I bet the eggcorn web site was started by a guy who discovered this phenomenon and couldn't figure out what the existing term was that we linguists use for it, so he coined a new one.


Not so, Samuel: for scholars of linguistics, eggcorns have become a specific topic. See, for example, the analyses here:

http://eggcorns.lascribe.net/

There are many other websites where eggcorns are discussed.

[Edited at 2011-08-11 08:53 GMT]


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Nicole Schnell  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:00
English to German
+ ...
A German example Aug 11, 2011

"Ein zweischneidiges Schwert", (literally: a double-edged sword - something that has or can have both favorable and unfavorable consequences) at times turns into:

"Ein zweischneidiges Pferd" - a double-edged horse

(This is from a collection of linguistic bloopers that we employees at a German ad agency loved to collect during endless and boring meetings)


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Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:00
Member (2008)
Italian to English
TOPIC STARTER
Not an eggcorn but..... Aug 11, 2011

...I have a very polite friend who always says "high faluting" because she doesn't know that "highfalutin" is correct.

[Edited at 2011-08-11 08:56 GMT]


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Holly Nathan  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 14:00
Italian to English
the ants are my friends, they're blowing in the wind Aug 11, 2011

There is a book which has loads of examples of misheard song lyrics. "Scuse me while I kiss this guy" etc.

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Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:00
Member (2008)
Italian to English
TOPIC STARTER
Website Aug 11, 2011

Holly Nathan wrote:

There is a book which has loads of examples of misheard song lyrics. "Scuse me while I kiss this guy" etc.


It's actually a website, Holly.

Here:

http://www.kissthisguy.com/


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Holly Nathan  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 14:00
Italian to English
out of print I think Aug 11, 2011

Tom in London wrote:

Holly Nathan wrote:

There is a book which has loads of examples of misheard song lyrics. "Scuse me while I kiss this guy" etc.


It's actually a website, Holly.

Here:

http://www.kissthisguy.com/


Very funny website.I am only going to look at it for five minutes and then I have to get back to my work. Only five minutes........................


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Phil Hand  Identity Verified
China
Local time: 20:00
Chinese to English
Always good to see a plug for Language Log Aug 11, 2011

It should be compulsory reading for anyone who writes professionally in English.

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Gilla Evans  Identity Verified
Local time: 13:00
Spanish to English
+ ...
Off topic - misheard song lyrics Aug 11, 2011

A friend of mine as a child genuinely thought the song went "a strawberry feels forever" and it put her off eating them.

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sailingshoes
Local time: 14:00
Spanish to English
Like me Aug 11, 2011

@Gilla

I've gone off eating blackberries. For good.

I like to say, "Let's build that bridge when we come to it."

[Modificato alle 2011-08-11 12:42 GMT]


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Steven Capsuto  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 08:00
Spanish to English
+ ...
Hardly a new phenomenon Aug 11, 2011

How is this different from a malapropism (a term that has been in use since the 1840s, some 60 years after the character of Mrs. Malaprop first stepped onto an English stage)?

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Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:00
Member (2008)
Italian to English
TOPIC STARTER
Aug 11, 2011

I wish there were some way to completely delete a post.

[Edited at 2011-08-11 12:58 GMT]


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Andy Watkinson
Spain
Local time: 14:00
Member
Catalan to English
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Linguists? Aug 11, 2011

Samuel Murray wrote:

Tom in London wrote:
Interesting article on the newly identified linguistic phenomenon of the eggcorn...


What would the difference be between eggcorns and popular etymology? Its the same thing, isn't it? I bet the eggcorn web site was started by a guy who discovered this phenomenon and couldn't figure out what the existing term was that we linguists use for it, so he coined a new one.


Eerrrm.....Samuel, the term was coined by the Language Log, a group of linguists.

And to Steven, if you go to their website it explains exactly what constitutes an eggcorn and how they differ from malapropisms.


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