Difference between English UK, Australian and New Zealand
Thread poster: karen henry

karen henry  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:31
French to English
Oct 24, 2012

Hello everyone,

Is there a big difference between these three variations of English? I wouldn't attempt to translate into English American as I know that there is a real difference between these languages, but what about Australian and New Zealand?

I'd be interested in hearing your views?


 

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:31
Member (2008)
Italian to English
NZ Oct 24, 2012

karen henry wrote:

Hello everyone,

Is there a big difference between these three variations of English? I wouldn't attempt to translate into English American as I know that there is a real difference between these languages, but what about Australian and New Zealand?

I'd be interested in hearing your views?



Thu dafferance batwoon Astroolian Anglish end NZ Anglish ez thut thai pranence thoor viewels duffrintly. See here for an amusing deemunstrooshin:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cr1TUE1doJ8

[Edited at 2012-10-24 10:08 GMT]


 

Michelle Hertrich  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 12:31
German to English
+ ...
Yes Oct 24, 2012

In my previous life as an Australian physiotherapist I spent some time working for the British military. Believe me, there is a difference between Australian English and British English (learnt the hard, but funny way). A few examples: "Sir, please wear your thongs to the hydrotherapy pool so that you don´t get tinea" (thong = flipflops in Oz, dental floss-like underwear in the UK), "Sir, please take off your pants so that I can look at your knee" (pants=trousers in Oz, underwear in the UK), etc, etc. I´ve never been to NZ, but I´ve never come across any such problems speaking to people from NZ in my travels. It´s only their accent that sounds funny to me (yes, those vowels, see Tom´s message).

 

neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 12:31
Spanish to English
+ ...
Fit for purpose Oct 24, 2012

I don't think there is much difference when it comes to formal texts, but journalistic and marketing language, for example, will probably need more local tweaking. I am quite happy translating into US English as long as I have at least one US English native speaker to check for Britishisms, but like anything else, the best bet is not to try doing it if you feel uncomfortable about it.

I mean, Ozzie vocabulary items like thongs, drongos, ockers and barbies aren't likely to come up in a manual for a solar power plant or a cement mixer...

[Edited at 2012-10-24 11:43 GMT]


 

NataliaAnne  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 09:31
Portuguese to English
In general, the more formal the text, the fewer the differences Oct 24, 2012

I totally agree with Neilmac in that formal texts have fewer differences. I’m an Australian and translate mostly into UK English, with US English being the second most requested variant from my clients. I have never even once been asked to provide a text in Australian English, so I’d be interested to hear how often you get this request!

Even though I’m Australian, my English usage has always been somewhat ‘international’ as I travelled extensively as a child. Working as an English teacher for many years and preparing students for exams in different countries then made me conscious of a lot of the differences between major English variants. However, when working I always make use of variant specific English dictionaries to double-check terms. Also, when I check terms by doing internet searches, I make sure that I look for sources for the particular target country.

Reflecting on what I’ve just said, it’s worth pointing out that legal texts probably have more differences than any other type of formal text, mainly due to the different legal systems. I was just looking at another post which provides a reference text for legal drafting and it has a useful table comparing criminal law terms from the US, UK, Canada and Australia.

http://www.proz.com/forum/legal/235852-guide_to_legal_drafting_in_english.html

As for the differences between Aussie and Kiwi English, I hardly notice anything at all, apart from the accent. Occasionally something comes up, but no more than it does anyway between Australian states or regions.


 

karen henry  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:31
French to English
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks Oct 24, 2012

Thanks for all your comments, I found them all interesting, especially the video Tom which was good!

 

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:31
Member (2008)
Italian to English
And what about.... Oct 24, 2012

karen henry wrote:

Thanks for all your comments, I found them all interesting, especially the video Tom which was good!



....South African English, ja?


 

karen henry  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:31
French to English
TOPIC STARTER
Yes! Oct 24, 2012

I think she did quite well impersonating all those accents--but she couldn't do the Welsh one, mind you neither could I!

 

Marlene Blanshay  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 06:31
Member (2009)
French to English
+ ...
thongs Oct 25, 2012

I remember flip-flop sandals being called 'thongs' years ago (Canada) but now they're all called flipflops and 'thongs' refers to the skimpy underwear (knickers UK).

 

Åsa Campbell  Identity Verified
Australia
Local time: 22:01
Member
English to Swedish
Flip-flop Oct 25, 2012

sandals are still called thongs in Australia which made us laugh when we moved here from Scotland a few years ago!

 

Olly Pekelharing  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 12:31
Member (2009)
Dutch to English
Beached Az Oct 25, 2012

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3cPs2SzShNc

 

karen henry  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:31
French to English
TOPIC STARTER
Very funny! Oct 25, 2012

Thanks Olly!

I'll remember the thongs too!


 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Difference between English UK, Australian and New Zealand

Advanced search






BaccS – Business Accounting Software
Modern desktop project management for freelance translators

BaccS makes it easy for translators to manage their projects, schedule tasks, create invoices, and view highly customizable reports. User-friendly, ProZ.com integration, community-driven development – a few reasons BaccS is trusted by translators!

More info »
SDL Trados Studio 2019 Freelance
The leading translation software used by over 250,000 translators.

SDL Trados Studio 2019 has evolved to bring translators a brand new experience. Designed with user experience at its core, Studio 2019 transforms how new users get up and running and helps experienced users make the most of the powerful features.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search