Pages in topic:   [1 2] >
What effect is the new verb "to impact" having on the English language?
Thread poster: Tom in London

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:06
Member (2008)
Italian to English
Oct 9, 2016

Or if you prefer:

How is "to impact" impacting on the English language?
How is "to impact" impacting the English language?
How is "to impact" affecting the English language?
What effect is "to impact" having on the English language?
What impact is "to impact" having on the English language?

What's wrong with "to affect (have an effect on) something" or ? "to (have an) impact (on something)" ?

Is it happening because people don't know the difference between "affect" and "effect"?

[Edited at 2016-10-09 13:41 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:06
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
Let's liaise! Oct 9, 2016

Impact is only one of several nouns which have acquired verb forms in recent years. I think it is this growing trend which should be discussed in general.

"Liaise" is one such neologism. I'm pretty sure "liaiser" does not exist in French, which is where the noun "liaison" comes from. So I don't know how this trend is impacting on English, but let's liaise and we might find out!


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Lingua 5B  Identity Verified
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Local time: 14:06
English to Croatian
+ ...
Not related. Oct 9, 2016

Jack Doughty wrote:

Impact is only one of several nouns which have acquired verb forms in recent years. I think it is this growing trend which should be discussed in general.

"Liaise" is one such neologism. I'm pretty sure "liaiser" does not exist in French, which is where the noun "liaison" comes from. So I don't know how this trend is impacting on English, but let's liaise and we might find out!


Yes, it's a loanword, but once borrowed, it takes its own course in the new language. Doesn't have to exist as a verb in French.

English is much more prone to creating verb forms out of its nouns, it is not happening (that) much or much at all in my native language. Yes, there are reasons for this but they are far too complex to discuss on this board. There are linguistic and extra-linguistic reasons.

[Edited at 2016-10-09 10:22 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:06
Member (2008)
Italian to English
TOPIC STARTER
loanword=? Oct 9, 2016

loanword?

That's a new one on me. In fact, its effect has had a significant impact on me. Maybe it means a borrowed word.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Dan Lucas  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:06
Member (2014)
Japanese to English
Hardly rare... Oct 9, 2016

Tom in London wrote:
That's a new one on me. ... Maybe it means a borrowed word.

The term "loanword" is neither new nor uncommon. It was certain in wide use in language study when I was a student in the late 1980s.

As to your point about "impact", this touches a nerve. I find it "impact" very ugly when used as a verb. I worked in multinational corporations for many years, an experience that I thought had left me inured to business-speak, but this still makes me flinch.

Dan


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Patrice  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:06
Member
French to English
+ ...
Someone need a thesis topic? Oct 9, 2016

That is a question with many possible answers, most of them probably more philosophical than practical. I'm still trying to figure out why people use 'around' when 'about' has always done perfectly well. Maybe some M.A. student out there wants to take this on for their thesis.

Direct link Reply with quote
 
finnword1
United States
Local time: 08:06
English to Finnish
+ ...
exactly, you can borrow it without having to pay it back Oct 10, 2016

Tom in London wrote:

loanword?

That's a new one on me. In fact, its effect has had a significant impact on me. Maybe it means a borrowed word.


loan·word

noun
a word adopted from a foreign language with little or no modification.

[Edited at 2016-10-10 00:27 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:06
Member (2008)
Italian to English
TOPIC STARTER
Around Oct 10, 2016

Patrice wrote:

That is a question with many possible answers, most of them probably more philosophical than practical. I'm still trying to figure out why people use 'around' when 'about' has always done perfectly well. Maybe some M.A. student out there wants to take this on for their thesis.


Examples please.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

matt robinson  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 14:06
Member (2010)
Spanish to English
limited Oct 10, 2016

It has limited impactfulness, I'll wager.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Lingua 5B  Identity Verified
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Local time: 14:06
English to Croatian
+ ...
100 pages on this subject? Oct 10, 2016

Patrice wrote:

That is a question with many possible answers, most of them probably more philosophical than practical. I'm still trying to figure out why people use 'around' when 'about' has always done perfectly well. Maybe some M.A. student out there wants to take this on for their thesis.


: ) )

I'm sure someone already did this before or something similar. : D

I like it how native English speakers just spontaneously create new phrasal verbs in nano-seconds, and it will take a couple of years before these verbs reach the dictionaries or maybe they never will. Maybe Tom can open a separate topic for each new phrasal verb that pops up?


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:06
Member (2008)
Italian to English
TOPIC STARTER
Much more than 100 pages Oct 10, 2016

Much more than 100 pages have been written on these matters, and continue to be written, by language scholars and experts.

What interests me is the process by which languages change by vulgarisation "from the bottom up" rather than through innovation on the part of a cultured linguistic elite. Do both happen? To what extent should these processes be resisted/accepted?

Like, that's what I mean. Get me?

"Sometimes these cogitations still amaze
The troubled midnight and the noon's repose."

Prufrock and Other Observations (1917) - T S Eliot.

[Edited at 2016-10-10 09:41 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Erik Freitag  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 14:06
Member (2006)
Dutch to German
+ ...
. Oct 10, 2016

Tom in London wrote:

... a cultured linguistic elite. [Edited at 2016-10-10 09:37 GMT]


Like the one that doesn't know the term "loanword"?


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:06
Member (2008)
Italian to English
TOPIC STARTER
No. Oct 10, 2016

Erik Freitag wrote:

Tom in London wrote:

... a cultured linguistic elite. [Edited at 2016-10-10 09:37 GMT]


Like the one that doesn't know the term "loanword"?


No. Try to say something serious.

I mentioned Eliot because in his poetry (and in modernist literature in general) "high language" is mixed with "the language of the street".

[Edited at 2016-10-10 09:49 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

26ramunas  Identity Verified
Lithuania
Local time: 15:06
English to Lithuanian
+ ...
two recent articles on the subject Oct 10, 2016

https://www.1843magazine.com/content/ideas/anthony-gardner/youve-been-verbed

http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20160825-why-medalling-and-summering-are-so-annoying


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Merab Dekano  Identity Verified
Spain
Member (2014)
English to Spanish
+ ...
It's a jargon Oct 10, 2016

Dan Lucas wrote:

Tom in London wrote:
That's a new one on me. ... Maybe it means a borrowed word.

The term "loanword" is neither new nor uncommon. It was certain in wide use in language study when I was a student in the late 1980s.

As to your point about "impact", this touches a nerve. I find it "impact" very ugly when used as a verb. I worked in multinational corporations for many years, an experience that I thought had left me inured to business-speak, but this still makes me flinch.

Dan



I’ve seen it in several business presentations, mainly used as “financial impact”, etc., but also as "this project will impact out PL..."

The Spanish language adopted it from the English language (again, mainly business Spanish), and both languages adopted it from French. The latter adopted it from Latin. Latin adopted it from what, Sumerian?

When I hear “impacto/impactar” in Spanish, I usually imagine something smashing straight into my face and my family rushing me to the hospital.

The same goes for the verb “lanzar”. It’s mostly mis(used) when people refer to “launching a product”. To me “lanzar un product” sounds like throwing it into someone’s face, which undoubtedly will produce a strong “impacto” on the individuals face, a fully-blown crime in the Western world.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pages in topic:   [1 2] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

What effect is the new verb "to impact" having on the English language?

Advanced search






WordFinder
The words you want Anywhere, Anytime

WordFinder is the market's fastest and easiest way of finding the right word, term, translation or synonym in one or more dictionaries. In our assortment you can choose among more than 120 dictionaries in 15 languages from leading publishers.

More info »
BaccS – Business Accounting Software
Modern desktop project management for freelance translators

BaccS makes it easy for translators to manage their projects, schedule tasks, create invoices, and view highly customizable reports. User-friendly, ProZ.com integration, community-driven development – a few reasons BaccS is trusted by translators!

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search