There are two languages in Brazil
Thread poster: Maria Luisa Duarte

Maria Luisa Duarte  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 21:28
English to Portuguese
+ ...
May 28, 2005

Hi all! some information regarding Brazilian Portuguese.

As Brazilian linguist MᲩo A. Perini has said: ‘’ There are two languages in Brazil. The one we write (and which is called ‘’Portuguese’’), and another one that we speak (which is so despised that there is not a name to call it). The latter is the mother tongue of Brazilians, the former has to be learned in school, and a majority of population does not manage to master it appropriately. […] Personally, I do not object to us writing Portuguese, but I think it is important to make clear that Portuguese is (at least in Brazil) only a written language. Our mother tongue is not Portuguese, but Brazilian Vernacular. This is not a slogan, nor a political statement, it is simply recognition of a fact. […] There are linguistic teams working hard in order to give the full description of the structure of the Vernacular. So, there are hopes, that within some years, we will have appropriate grammars of our mother tongue, the language that has been ignored, denied and despised for such a long time.’’

Brazilian Portuguese
According to many Brazilian linguists (Bortoni, Kato, Mattos e Silva, Bagno, Perini), Brazilian Portuguese is a highly diglossic language. L-variant (also known as Brazilian vernacular) is the mother tongue of all Brazilians, and H-variant (standard Brazilian Portuguese) is acquired through schooling. L-variant is a simplified form of archaic Portuguese, influenced by Amerindian and African languages, while H-variant is a form based on 19th-century European Portuguese (and it is very similar to Standard European Portuguese, with only orthography being a little different). MᲩo A. Perini (Brazilian linguist) compares the differences between L- and H- variants of Brazilian Portuguese with those between Standard Spanish and Standard Portuguese.

L-variant is the spoken form of Brazilian Portuguese, avoided only in very formal speech (court interrogation, political debate) while H-variant is the written form of Brazilian Portuguese, avoided only in informal writing (such as songs lyrics, love letters, intimate friends correspondence). Even language professors many times use L-variant while explaining students the structure and usage of H-variant. But, in essays, all students are expected to use H-variant.

L-variant is used in songs, movies, soap operas, sitcoms and other television shows, although, at times, H-variant is used in historic films or soap operas to make the language used sound more ‘’elegant’’ and/or ‘’archaic’’. H-variant used to be preferred in dubbing of foreign films and series into Brazilian Portuguese, but nowadays L-variant is preferred. Movies subtitles normally use a mixture of L- and H-variants, but remain closer to H-variant.

Most literal works are written in H-variant. They have been attempts at writing in L-variant (masterpiece Macuna�, written by Brazilian modernist MᲩo de Andrade), but, presently, L-variant is used only in dialogs. Still, many contemporary writers like using H-variant even in informal dialogs. This is also true of translated books, which never use L-variant, only the H-one. Children books seem to be more L-friendly, but, again, if they are translated from another language (Little Prince, for instance) they will use the H-variant only.

Most linguist use the term ‘’Brazilian Portuguese’’ to describe the mesolect of Brazilian Vernacular, not the Standard Brazilian Portuguese which is almost identical to Standard European Portuguese. This idiom is characterized by simplification in verbal and pronominal systems and many changes in prepositional system, but the most striking differences are those affecting syntax. Brazilian linguist Fernando Tarallo claims that ‘’the portuguese language variety used in Brazil has developed quite a reasonable number of syntactic features different from the European system. These differences are large enough to allow for a description of the Brazilian variety in the sense of a Brazilian grammar’’. The same was confirmed later, by Brazilian-based French linguist Galves.

The mesolect form of Brazilian Vernacular (that is, the one used in the speech of middle class Brazilians) is the form of Brazilian Portuguese language taught at American universities. H-varieties are explained later after students have mastered the L-variants.

http://www.nationmaster.com/country/po


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Lorenzo Lilli  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:28
German to Italian
+ ...
thanks May 28, 2005

Thanks for this interesting contribution, Maria Luisa. Muito obrigado

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ROCHA-ROBINSON  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 16:28
Member (2004)
Portuguese to English
+ ...
over 200 spoken on a daily basis! May 28, 2005

Hi there Maria Luisa!

Great article on Portuguese... 'ki bom que a gente vemo aqui o que nós fala no dia-dia' hehehe...

Spotted this and couldn't help adding a footnote -

Of course, besides the class-variant forms of Portuguese and 'Globese' (Globo TV network style language in youth culture, music, soap-operas etc..), there are over 200 distinct languages and dialects spoken by the numerous indigenous groups throughout Brazil.
There are currently around 358 thousand indians who speak 180 distinct languages - aside from varying localised dialects.
My own adopted daughter's ethnic people-nation - UMUTINA - no longer speak their language on a daily basis as the last surviving fluent speaker died just over a year ago.

In my home state alone, there are over 30 different linguistic groups and most are not yet fluent in Portuguese even as a second language.

This is not to mention specific regions of Brazil where the first language spoken is German, Italian or Japanese! After all, Brazil has the largest Japanese colony outside of Japan in the entire world.

Just thought I'd get this in.

Take care MLD!

Cheers

Steve Robinson - Mato Grosso/Brazil
www.proz.com/pro/78313






[Edited at 2005-05-28 15:13]


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António Ribeiro  Identity Verified
Local time: 05:28
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Muito interessante May 29, 2005

STEVEN ROBINSON wrote:

Of course, besides the class-variant forms of Portuguese and 'Globese' (Globo TV network style language in youth culture, music, soap-operas etc..), there are over 200 distinct languages and dialects spoken by the numerous indigenous groups throughout Brazil.
There are currently around 358 thousand indians who speak 180 distinct languages - aside from varying localised dialects.



In my home state alone, there are over 30 different linguistic groups and most are not yet fluent in Portuguese even as a second language.

This is not to mention specific regions of Brazil where the first language spoken is German, Italian or Japanese! After all, Brazil has the largest Japanese colony outside of Japan in the entire world.




Obrigado Steven pela informação. Só vem confirmar o quão ridículo é ver comentários como "somos mais de 200 milhões e vocês são só 10 milhões" (a eterna disputa Brasil - Portugal)!!!

António Ribeiro
Austrália


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There are two languages in Brazil

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