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Minister of (examples of Canadian English)
Thread poster: #41698 (LSF)

#41698 (LSF)
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Mar 7, 2006

The Canadians seem to have a preference for "Minister of" instead of "Minister for". Is this the influence of the French "de la"?
And has the Canadians evolved an English version of their own such as in the medley of UK/US spellings?

[Subject edited by staff or moderator 2006-03-07 14:32]


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Tina Vonhof  Identity Verified
Canada
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Canadian ways Mar 7, 2006

Yes, in Canada we say 'Minister of...'. This is not typically Canadian or French, it is done this way in many other languages.

The spelling is the same as British English with the exception of words such as organising and organisation, which are spelled with a 'z' in Canada (the same as in US English), i.e., organizing and organization.

[Edited at 2006-03-07 16:17]


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#41698 (LSF)
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Crossing the Atlantic Mar 7, 2006

Tina Vonhof wrote:

The spelling is the same as British English with the exception of words such as organising and organisation, which are spelled with a 'z' in Canada (the same as in US English), i.e., organizing and organization.



It must have been quite hard for Canadians to be still in bed with the British across the Atlantic when the trade and cultural exchanges are mostly with the US.

Do you use "French fries", "potato chips" or whatever?
Do you say "overpass" or "flyover"?
Do you punctuate as "period" or "full stop"?


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Marcus Malabad  Identity Verified
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Canadian English Mar 7, 2006

Lew,

There are tons of material on the Web about the peculiarities of Canadian English. One great site is this:

http://www.ic.arizona.edu/~lsp/CanadianEnglish.html

M


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NancyLynn
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What's a flyover? Mar 7, 2006

To me, an overpass is the highway that goes over the road you're on, like a bridge.

Not so sure about z in organisation either - Canadians use both spellings.

Marcus, I can't access your link...:-(

Nancy


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Debbie Tacium Ladry  Identity Verified
Local time: 10:34
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flyover? Mar 7, 2006

NancyLynn wrote:

To me, an overpass is the highway that goes over the road you're on, like a bridge.

Not so sure about z in organisation either - Canadians use both spellings.

Marcus, I can't access your link...:-(

Nancy


I thought a flyover was a city or an area of the country you...fly over. Like, not a destination. ; )

Like you say, both spellings - s and z - are good Canadian, but I kinda cringe when a Canadian spells 'color' instead of 'colour'. Americans are just our neighbOUrs, after all. : )


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NancyLynn
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Missed period Mar 7, 2006

Recently I proofread a doc for a UK agency, and the only comment I had to make about a particular sentence was that the period had not been added at the end. In the name of simplicity and less typing, I put "missed period".

The PM wrote back saying he had changed that to "missing full stop", as "missed period" would mean my current condition - expecting!

Nancy


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#41698 (LSF)
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Flying over to London but not crossing the neighbOr's fence? Mar 8, 2006

Debbie Tacium Ladry wrote:

I thought a flyover was a city or an area of the country you...fly over. Like, not a destination. ; )



Americans are just our neighbOUrs, after all. : )



Would that mean Canadians would have no truck with a turnpike as the bell tolls over at the neighbOr's side?


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NancyLynn
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-our and -re Mar 8, 2006

Right, Deb, colour, flavour, odour... and centre, centimetre, litre, metre... because meter has something to do with poetry

What's a turnpike?

Nancy


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#41698 (LSF)
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True British throroughbred Mar 8, 2006

NancyLynn wrote:

Recently I proofread a doc for a UK agency, and the only comment I had to make about a particular sentence was that the period had not been added at the end. In the name of simplicity and less typing, I put "missed period".

The PM wrote back saying he had changed that to "missing full stop", as "missed period" would mean my current condition - expecting!

Nancy


Your anecdoctal PM might say the Americans are driving on the wrong side of the road.

Do the Canadians follow the British for traffic directions or would it be continental Europe?


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French Foodie  Identity Verified
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Congratulations! Mar 8, 2006

NancyLynn wrote:

Recently I proofread a doc for a UK agency, and the only comment I had to make about a particular sentence was that the period had not been added at the end. In the name of simplicity and less typing, I put "missed period".

The PM wrote back saying he had changed that to "missing full stop", as "missed period" would mean my current condition - expecting!

Nancy


Congratulations on the upcoming arrival


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sylvie malich
Germany
Local time: 16:34
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Thanks Marcus Mar 8, 2006

Marcus Malabad wrote:

Lew,

There are tons of material on the Web about the peculiarities of Canadian English. One great site is this:

http://www.ic.arizona.edu/~lsp/CanadianEnglish.html

M


This exiled Canadian thanks you for the link. It's terribly good reading and I've sent it on to my Canadian relative(s) who are (still) annoyed at the way the Americans write their dates!

sylvie

www.einmalich.net


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NancyLynn
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Thanks Mara & Marcus Mar 8, 2006

For some reason I couldn't access the link yesterday, but I can today, and it looks like good reading.

Thanks Mara, the little girl should arrive in around 6 weeks or so...:-D

Nancy


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NancyLynn
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Phonetics across the border Mar 8, 2006

Now that I can access the link, I've been reading:

A result of the merger is that the low-back region of the vowel space is less dense; allowing for the low-front vowel to retract to a low-central articulation. This retraction moves in the opposite direction of where it has shifted in the Northern (US) Cities Shift. Boberg (2000) sums up the result rather succinctly: the word stack is pronounced in Windsor, Ontario (indeed, in the rest of Canada) with the same vowel of the word stock as pronounced in Detroit, just across the river.


Man, ain't that the truth. My husband's mother is from Massena, NY, literally straight across the St. Lawrence River. She's been here so long, she talks like us. But her sister! Aye aye aye! Once at a family gathering she was talking to me about her "dals", what the heck is she talking about? It turned out she was talking about her decorative porcelain doll collection!!!

This feature of our American cousins announces our dear founder, Henry, when he calls here, before he identifies himself - I know it's him by his accent. However he asked me once how long I'd had the accent - I said, what accent? do I have a French accent? - No, the Canadian one, he replied, laughing....

I don't have an accent, he and all his neighbours do!!!

Nancy


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NancyLynn
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OK - one more: oot and aboot Mar 8, 2006

An Irishman once told me in a London bar that to differentiate myself from Americans, to the Brits (and the Americans!) I should start every new conversation with "I'm just oot and aboot"

I did notice, though, that that particular Canadianism readily identified me every time.

Nancy


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Minister of (examples of Canadian English)

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