Rumi's translated poetry
Thread poster: RHELLER
RHELLER
United States
Local time: 23:18
French to English
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Oct 23, 2004

http://www.rumi.net/rumi_by_shiva.htm

(click on "poems")
Rumi (1207-1273)

Thanks to my proz colleague for inspiring me to find out more.


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Kirill Semenov  Identity Verified
Ukraine
Local time: 08:18
Member (2004)
English to Russian
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Also in Russian Oct 23, 2004

Rita Heller wrote:
Thanks to my proz colleague for inspiring me to find out more.


Rumi whose mystical poetry is called "Al'Quran in Persian" is a must reading!

I'm also adding a couple of links to his translations into Russian:

http://www.lib.ru/POEEAST/pers1.txt

and

http://www.lib.ru/POEEAST/RUMI/stih1.txt


[Edited at 2004-10-23 20:20]


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Seadeta Osmani  Identity Verified
Croatia
Local time: 07:18
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Thank you! Oct 23, 2004

Thank you, thank you, thank you!

Been in Rumi's Museum in Konya, Turkey in summer 2004.
A wonderful experience! "Sema", performance of whirling dervishes, should also be seen.

A few Rumi's advice found in Konya:

* In generosity and helping others be like the river.
* In compassion and grace be like the sun.
* In concealing others' faults be like the night.
* In anger and fury be like the dead.
* In modesty and humility be like the earth.
* In tolerance be like the sea.
* Either exist as you are or be as you look.



[Edited at 2004-10-23 21:56]


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Kirill Semenov  Identity Verified
Ukraine
Local time: 08:18
Member (2004)
English to Russian
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Thank you for the links Oct 23, 2004

Dear Tayfun, thank you for the links.

In Russian tradition he is usually called Jalal ad-Din Rumi. I didn't know he was one of Turkish theologians, though (I've always thought he was Persian mystic poet and Sufi sage). Anyway, his "Masnavi" is just beautiful! Unfortunately I read it in Russian translation only -- still, it was great.


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Rahi Moosavi  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 01:18
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Farsi (Persian) to English
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Persian .... Oct 24, 2004

Hi

I never knew Molana Jalal-e Din Rumi was considered Turkish or Anatolyian. We in Iran always think of him being Persian (Iranian). He was not born in Konya but only resided there.

As you see in below quote from http://www.rumi.org.uk, he was born in Balkh region (present day afghanistan) which was a part of the ancient Persian empire and Persian was his mother tounge.

Rumi was born in Wakhsh under the administration of Balkh in 30 September 1207 to a family of learned theologians. Escaping the Mongol invasion and destruction, Rumi and his family traveled extensively in the Muslim lands, performed pilgrimage to Mecca and finally settled in Konya, Anatolia, then part of Seljuk Empire. When his father Bahaduddin Valad passed away, Rumi succeeded his father in 1231 as professor in religious sciences. Rumi 24 years old, was an already accomplished scholar in religious and positive sciences.

He was introduced into the mystical path by a wandering dervish, Shamsuddin of Tabriz. His love and his bereavement for the death of Shams found their expression in a surge of music, dance and lyric poems, `Divani Shamsi Tabrizi'. Rumi is the author of six volume didactic epic work, the `Mathnawi', called as the 'Koran in Persian' by Jami, and discourses, `Fihi ma Fihi', written to introduce his disciples into metaphysics.

If there is any general idea underlying Rumi's poetry, it is the absolute love of God. His influence on thought, literature and all forms of aesthetic expression in the world of Islam cannot be overrated.

Mevlana Jalaluddin Rumi died on December 17, 1273. Men of five faiths followed his bier. That night was named Sebul Arus (Night of Union). Ever since, the Mawlawi dervishes have kept that date as a festival.


[Edited at 2004-10-24 13:07]

[Edited at 2004-10-24 13:08]

[Edited at 2004-10-24 13:12]


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RHELLER
United States
Local time: 23:18
French to English
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TOPIC STARTER
Rumi's advice Oct 24, 2004

Wow! I am impressed that you all responded

thanks to Seadeta,
13th century advice we can use today

* In generosity and helping others be like the river.
* In compassion and grace be like the sun.
* In concealing others' faults be like the night.
* In anger and fury be like the dead.
* In modesty and humility be like the earth.
* In tolerance be like the sea.
* Either exist as you are or be as you look.

my question: is the sea really tolerant?


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Seadeta Osmani  Identity Verified
Croatia
Local time: 07:18
English to Croatian
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My guess is... Oct 24, 2004

Rita Heller wrote:

* In tolerance be like the sea.

my question: is the sea really tolerant?


... the sea is BIG and OPEN, as should our tolerance be

Seadeta


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Kirill Semenov  Identity Verified
Ukraine
Local time: 08:18
Member (2004)
English to Russian
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Without limits Oct 24, 2004

I agree.

Seadeta Osmani wrote:
Rita Heller wrote:
* In tolerance be like the sea.
my question: is the sea really tolerant?

... the sea is BIG and OPEN, as should our tolerance be
Seadeta


In Sufi mysticism "sea" or "ocean" was a common metaphor for anything unbound, limitless, unmeasurable, all-compassing.


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Roomy Naqvy  Identity Verified
India
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From the namesake... Oct 24, 2004

Maulana Rumi's Masnavi is his greatest work and I have read an abridged English translation but a full English translation, albeit older in print done by a Westerner, also exists.

The interesting thing about him was that he was very rich, very knowledgeable but very humble. His homage to Shams of Tabrez is well known.

Roomy


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RHELLER
United States
Local time: 23:18
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symbolism of the sea Oct 24, 2004

Thanks, Seadeta and Kirill for explaining that!

You are all great teachers


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davidgreen
German to English
my favorite line from Rumi Oct 25, 2004

Sorry to chime in with something that doesn't quite fit the sentiments expressed here but my favorite line from Rumi (English translation, as I remember it, might be slightly different wording) "The deer faints in the paws of the lion. Afterwards, the deer is merely a glazed expression on the lion's face."

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Ouadoud  Identity Verified
Local time: 08:18
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Thanks Rita for the topic Oct 26, 2004

Salaam,

Annamaria Schimmel is a German Orientalist that studied thoroughly and quite honestly Sufism. She wrote different books on Islam and Sufism. Her approach is precise because she studied almost all the great masters of Sufism and understood its internal evolution. She wrote an important (also in volume) work about Jalel Eddine Rumi called “Eshems Adhafera” translated into German under another title.

Back to Rumi.

One of the simplest and most beautiful definitions of Sufism, written by Rumi is: “The heart feels happiness when time of sadness is near”.

The greatest Persian poet in Sufism is surely Jalel Eddine Rumi (1207-1273 AD) who emigrated to Anatolia with his parents. In his work “Tabreez Sun” he wrote more than 40.000 verses about transcendence and spiritual joy. TS is a very lyric poetry, signed by musicality and refinement.
He wrote then “Al methnawee” mystic encyclopedia that starts as follows:
“Listen to the flute narrating, complaining and suffering from the painful division”.
The flute in this case is changed into a symbol of the soul taken away from its divine root.
Later, Rumi developed the Sufi dance, both the central and the circular, into an independent religious expression. It symbolizes, according to his interpretation, the stars dance or even the death and the resurrection.


I tried to copy & paste the portrait of Rumi, but no way. You can see it here:
http://geocities.com/marxist_lb/al_Roumi.htm

Ouadoud


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Kirill Semenov  Identity Verified
Ukraine
Local time: 08:18
Member (2004)
English to Russian
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Khalil Gibran, Oct 26, 2004

Speaking of Sufism, I cannot pass by another great Sufi mystic, Khalil Gibran, and his "The Prophet". Highly recommended!

http://www.columbia.edu/~gm84/gibtable.html

http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Lakes/2670/gibran.html

[Edited at 2004-10-26 18:49]


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RHELLER
United States
Local time: 23:18
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TOPIC STARTER
back in the 1960s (Kahlil Gibran) Oct 26, 2004

Now I am really showing my age

Most of the younger generation read The Prophet at that time.

His book and many others which were en vogue at that time are listed on the following website(in case anyone is interested). Most have nothing to do with Sufism.

http://www.hipplanet.com/books/atoz/books.htm


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Ouadoud  Identity Verified
Local time: 08:18
English to Arabic
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I have some reserve Oct 26, 2004

well, I do not think that Gibran was a sufi. A wise, talented and brilliant philosopher, writer, poet... may be.
But I do not think he was or pretended to be a sufi.
Sorry, no offense.

Ouadoud


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Rumi's translated poetry

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