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Our friends' birthdays
Thread poster: Aurora Humarán
Aurora Humarán  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 08:33
English to Spanish
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Jan 9, 2006

Simone Lucie-Ernestine-Marie-Bertrand de Beauvoir was born on January 9 1908 in Paris, France.




"Life is about more than just maintaining oneself, it is about extending oneself. Otherwise living is only not dying."

Simone de Beauvoir


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Leticia Monge  Identity Verified
Argentina
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Had to say something Jan 9, 2006

"I tore myself away from the safe comfort of certainties through my love for truth and truth rewarded me."

Simone de Beauvoir? Just the smartest and more solid (yes, I think she would have picked that word too) woman the world ever knew.

She came to stay.


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Eduardo Pérez  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 08:33
Spanish to English
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Old debt Jan 9, 2006

A long time ago I started reading "¿Para qué la acción?" (sorry folks, don´t know the translation). I don´t remember much about it, to be honest, and I didn´t finish it, either; don´t know why really. What I do recall is precisely that, Leti... smart, solid, determined, wise and much more (and beautiful, indeed, but I don´t think that´s relevant)). I guess unpaid debts must be paid some day. For the Spanish horde, if interested, take a FREE look at http://www.creatividadfeminista.org/articulos/2004/gen04_beouvioir1.htm
Nice reading for the summer. Thanks girls for bringing her up.
Edu.


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Maya Jurt  Identity Verified
Switzerland
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Member (2002)
French to German
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Memorias de una Joven Formal Jan 9, 2006

"Mémoires d'une jeunes fille rangée".
If you do not know her, start with this book. You will get to know the women of France - past and present - despite the fact that this book was written 50 years ago.

You will meet "La vieille France" - and anticipate the changes that are now past.

And you will soon be ready for Sartre (ugly macho, great mind).

"Woman is not born, but made".


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Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
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Russian to English
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Another literary birthday today. Jan 9, 2006


Karel Čapek: (January 9, 1890 - December 25, 1938) was one of the most important Czech writers of the 20th century. He introduced and made popular the frequently used international word robot, which first appeared in his play R.U.R. (Rossum's Universal Robots) in 1920. The true inventor of the term robot was Karel's brother Josef Čapek.

Karel Čapek
Čapek was born in Male Svatonovice, then Austria-Hungary, now Czech Republic.
Life and work
Karel Čapek wrote with intelligence and humor on a wide variety of subjects. His works are known not only for interesting and exact descriptions of reality, but also for his excellent work with the Czech language. He is perhaps best known as a science fiction author, who wrote long before science fiction became established as a separate genre. He can be counted as one of the founders of classical non-hardcore European science fiction, which focuses on possible future (or alternative) social and human evolution on Earth, rather than technically advanced stories of space travel. However, it is best to class him with Aldous Huxley and George Orwell as a mainstream literary figure who used science-fiction motifs.
Many of his works discuss ethical and other aspects of the revolutionary inventions and processes that were already expected in the first half of 20th century. These included mass production, atomic weapons, and post-human intelligent beings such as robots or intelligent salamanders.
In this, Čapek was also expressing fear of upcoming social disasters, dictatorship, violence, and unlimited power of corporations, and trying to find some hope for human beings. Čapek's literary heirs include Ray Bradbury, Salman Rushdie, Brian Aldiss and Dan Simmons.
His other books and plays include detective stories, novels, fairy tales and theatre plays, and even a book on gardening. The most important works try to resolve the problem of epistemology, or "What is knowledge?": The Tales from Two Pockets, and first of all the trilogy of novels Hordubal, Meteor and An Ordinary Life.
Later, in the 1930s, Čapek's work focused on the threat of brutal Nazi and fascist (but also communist) dictatorships. His most productive years corresponded with the existence of the first republic of Czechoslovakia (1918-1938). He wrote Talks with T.G. Masaryk, a Czech patriot and first President of Czechoslovakia and a regular guest at Čapek's Friday garden parties for Czech patriots. This extraordinary relationship between the great author and the great political leader is perhaps unique, and is known to have been an inspiration to Vaclav Havel. He also became a member of International PEN.
Karel Čapek died in the December preceding the outbreak of World War II and was interred in the Vysehrad cemetery in Prague. Soon after it became clear that the Western allies had refused to help defend Czechoslovakia against Hitler, he refused to eat or leave his country and died of double pneumonia. The Gestapo had ranked him as "public enemy number 2" in Czechoslovakia. His brother Josef Čapek, a painter and also a writer, died in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp.
After the war, Čapek's work was only reluctantly accepted by the Communist regime of Czechoslovakia, since during his life he had refused to believe in a communist utopia as a viable alternative to the threat of Nazi domination.


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Aurora Humarán  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 08:33
English to Spanish
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TOPIC STARTER
Thank you, Jack! Jan 9, 2006

I have never read him. 'Where' should I start?

Au


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Aurora Humarán  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 08:33
English to Spanish
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TOPIC STARTER
Sir Charles G.D. Roberts was born on January 10, 1860. Jan 10, 2006



Sir Charles G.D.Roberts is said to be the Father of Canadian Poetry. (Just see his 'use' of words and sounds below:

Moonlight

The fifers of these amethystine fields,
Whose far fine sound the night makes recall
Now while thou wak'st and longing would'st recall
Joys that no rapture of remembrance yields,
Voice to thy soul, lone-sitting deep within
The still recesses of thine ecstasy,
My love and my desire, that fain would fly
With this far-silvering moon and fold the in.

But not for us the touch, the clasp, the kiss,
And for our restlessness no rest. In vain
These aching lips, these hungering hearts that strain
Toward the denied fruition of our bliss,
Had love not learned of longing to devise
Out of desire and dream our paradise.


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Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:33
Member (2000)
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To Aurora Jan 10, 2006

I am not very familiar with Capek's work myself, maybe one of our Czech colleagues could advise you But I remember hearing the play "R.U.R." on the radio as a small boy during the Second World War, and it made such an impression on me that I still remember it quite well.

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Aurora Humarán  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 08:33
English to Spanish
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TOPIC STARTER
Capek Jan 10, 2006

Jack Doughty wrote:

I am not very familiar with Capek's work myself, maybe one of our Czech colleagues could advise you But I remember hearing the play "R.U.R." on the radio as a small boy during the Second World War, and it made such an impression on me that I still remember it quite well.


Thank you, Jack! I will investigate in the bookstores I usually (too usually!) visit.

Au


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xxxname_removed
Local time: 12:33
Croatian to German
Simone de Beauvoir Jan 10, 2006

Although she was a very intelligent person, it couldn't prevent her from suffering because of a man (Jean-Paul Sartre). When it comes to feelings no "ratio" (in the meaning of the Latin language) can help you. Unfortunately!




[Edited at 2006-01-14 04:44]


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Susana Galilea  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:33
English to Spanish
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Simone Jan 10, 2006

xxxname_removed wrote:
Although she was a very intelligent person, it couldn't prevent her to suffer because of a man (Jean-Paul Sartre). When it comes to feelings no "ratio" (in the meaning of the Latin language) can help you. Unfortunately!



True, but at least she was intelligent enough to repay him in kind. There are certain streets in Chicago (and an entire book of correspondence between them) that still evoke her torrid love affair with writer Nelson Algren (yes, during her Sartre years). Although one can't help but wonder about her taste in mates, from what I hear Algren used to go around the 'hood bragging about how he was scr*w*ng "Sartre's chick", oh la la...

Susana


[Edited at 2006-01-10 22:36]


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xxxname_removed
Local time: 12:33
Croatian to German
ha, ha, ha...didn't know he was such a gentleman! Jan 10, 2006

Then I can assume that she had chosen a person of such "qualities" by purpose, to make it a double retaliation. Nelson Algren for sure had also other qualities, because it is said that she had her first orgasm with him (at the age of 39!!). Simone had also some love affairs with women, but still, she was shattered when Sartre died.

[Edited at 2006-01-11 01:13]

[Edited at 2006-01-11 15:17]


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Aurora Humarán  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 08:33
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
O.T. funny you mention this word, Zrinka Jan 11, 2006

xxxname_removed wrote:

...retaliation...



We happened to be talking about the word 'retaliation' in a list that focuses on the Spanish language. Some people complained that many Spanish speakers are using the word 'retaliación' these days, and pointed it to be another anglicism in Spanish. (The word 'retaliación' was not very frequent a couple of years ago and now it is becoming more and more usual in Spanish.) The paradox is that its origins ARE in a romance language as it derives from the 'Law of Talion' ('eye for eye'). A romance word that returns to Spanish after living in the English language for so many centuries.


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