Off topic: L'ampoule dans nos toilettes est brûlée.
Thread poster: Heinrich Pesch

Heinrich Pesch  Identity Verified
Finland
Local time: 11:54
Member (2003)
Finnish to German
+ ...
Apr 20, 2013

In our small hotel, after arriving from our daily excursion, we noticed the lamp in our toilet said "pox" and stayed dark.
I wanted to tell the message to our hosts when going to dinner, so I thought to ask Google translate. As a first attempt I typed "The light bulb in our toilet is burned". And Google delivered the translation in the header.
I did not quite trust this solution so I tried German "Die Glühbirne ist ausgebrannt". This changed the verb to "grillée". Only after I typed "Die Glühbirne ist kaputt" did I get the result "L'ampoule dans nos toilettes est cassée".
I told so the Madame and she understood at once. I still don't know how one really should say this in French, but at least I made an impression on my wife with my fluent French.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Francis Marche  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 10:54
English to French
+ ...
C'est "grillé" Apr 20, 2013

The standard French phrase is "l'ampoule est grillée".

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Catherine GUILLIAUMET  Identity Verified
Local time: 10:54
English to French
+ ...
Grillée, effectivement Apr 20, 2013

Hello Heinrich,

"cassée" (literally : broken) was understood because the lady was aware that you were a foreigner who was kind as to make the effort to try to speak French, which is always appreciated.

The right term is "grillée" (= roasted).

You were right when you rejected "brûlée", although it was the literal translation of the English "burnt".
In France, we roast the light bulbs, we don't burn them. Aren't we known worldwide as excellent great chefs, are we?

Enjoy your week-end
Catherine


Direct link Reply with quote
 
VJC
Local time: 10:54
German to French
fiat lux ! Apr 20, 2013

L'ampoule est fichue, la lumière ne marche plus.
Une lampe, s'il vous plaît ou une chandelle !
Ma chandelle est morte, je n'ai plus de feu.
Nous n'avons plus de lumière aux toilettes. Que se passe-t-il, s'il vous plaît ?

[Modifié le 2013-04-20 15:56 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Heinrich Pesch  Identity Verified
Finland
Local time: 11:54
Member (2003)
Finnish to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Use MT only, if the target language is your first language Apr 21, 2013

Thanks for conforming the right translation!
My initial English sentence was faulty, it should be "burned out". Then MT would have delivered the correct answer "grillée". But I would not have believed this to be correct, since I would have connected it to food-processing, like "brulée".
This example shows that MT should not be used when translating into a unknown or badly known language, only into your first language.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Russell Jones  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:54
Italian to English
English usage Apr 21, 2013

As a native English speaker, I've never heard of light bulbs being burnt, roasted, grilled, fried or baked.
They go, they've gone, they went!


Direct link Reply with quote
 
XXXphxxx  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:54
Portuguese to English
+ ...
Indeed Apr 21, 2013

Russell Jones wrote:

As a native English speaker, I've never heard of light bulbs being burnt, roasted, grilled, fried or baked.
They go, they've gone, they went!


Or maybe "had it".


Direct link Reply with quote
 

LEXpert  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 03:54
Member (2008)
Croatian to English
+ ...
BE/AE? Apr 21, 2013

Russell Jones wrote:

As a native English speaker, I've never heard of light bulbs being burnt, roasted, grilled, fried or baked.
They go, they've gone, they went!


Interesting.
In AE, the most common expression is that the light bulb has/is "burned out".


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Heinrich Pesch  Identity Verified
Finland
Local time: 11:54
Member (2003)
Finnish to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Went where? Apr 21, 2013

Russell Jones wrote:

As a native English speaker, I've never heard of light bulbs being burnt, roasted, grilled, fried or baked.
They go, they've gone, they went!


When I feed into GT the expression "The light bulb went." I get for French "L'ampoule est allé." And for "...had it" - "L'ampoule avait." I wonder if an intelligent person would understand this.

From French "L'ampoule est grillée" GT gets "The bulb is burned out" or DE "Die Glühbirne ist durchgebrannt" and FI "Polttimo on palanut". All correct.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
XXXphxxx  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:54
Portuguese to English
+ ...
Precisely Apr 21, 2013

Heinrich Pesch wrote:

Russell Jones wrote:

As a native English speaker, I've never heard of light bulbs being burnt, roasted, grilled, fried or baked.
They go, they've gone, they went!


When I feed into GT the expression "The light bulb went." I get for French "L'ampoule est allé." And for "...had it" - "L'ampoule avait." I wonder if an intelligent person would understand this.

From French "L'ampoule est grillée" GT gets "The bulb is burned out" or DE "Die Glühbirne ist durchgebrannt" and FI "Polttimo on palanut". All correct.


A perfect illustration of the limitations and flaws of MT.

For more discussion on the passing of lightbulbs: http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1600396. It would appear that "gone" is a British expression which is amusing to our friends across the pond.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Texte Style
Local time: 10:54
French to English
lightbulbs and marriages Apr 21, 2013

Lisa Simpson, MCIL wrote:

For more discussion on the passing of lightbulbs: http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1600396. It would appear that "gone" is a British expression which is amusing to our friends across the pond.


Thank you Lisa, it's an excellent thread and even includes marriage guidance:

"M: You don't say: "You need to change the light bulb in the hallway"?
W: Ah, no. This is the secret to the successful marriage. Make an observation, not a demand! "



Can you not say "the light's blown a fuse"?

That's what came to my mind spontaneously, but then I don't speak in English with my man so it may be one of those things where my English has rusted. I would have said that it was "grillée" but I didn't dare answer before because I was convinced that it was slang and was racking my brain for a more official term.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Paul Adie  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Spanish to English
+ ...
What bulbs do Apr 21, 2013

I thought bulbs 'blew', as in 'the bulb has blown, we need to replace it'. Interesting differences between AE and BE!

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jane Proctor  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 10:54
French to English
The strange antics of light bulbs Apr 22, 2013

Heinrich Pesch wrote:

we noticed the lamp in our toilet said "pox"


Whilst Russell's (and my) light bulb is walking out of the door.. Heinrich is having a conversation with his!


Thanks for making me smile Heinrich:)


[Edited at 2013-04-22 09:14 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Russell Jones  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:54
Italian to English
Blowing in the wind Apr 22, 2013

Paul Adie wrote:

I thought bulbs 'blew', as in 'the bulb has blown, we need to replace it'. Interesting differences between AE and BE!


You beat me to it Paul; my wife reminded me of this as an equally common term in BE.

Not "blowing a fuse" though; apart from its figurative meaning (getting angry) that refers to electrical plugs or circuits rather than bulbs.


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

L'ampoule dans nos toilettes est brûlée.

Advanced search






CafeTran Espresso
You've never met a CAT tool this clever!

Translate faster & easier, using a sophisticated CAT tool built by a translator / developer. Accept jobs from clients who use SDL Trados, MemoQ, Wordfast & major CAT tools. Download and start using CafeTran Espresso -- for free

More info »
WordFinder
The words you want Anywhere, Anytime

WordFinder is the market's fastest and easiest way of finding the right word, term, translation or synonym in one or more dictionaries. In our assortment you can choose among more than 120 dictionaries in 15 languages from leading publishers.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search