Certificate/Diploma/MA, in source or target language?
Thread poster: Zeki Güler

Zeki Güler  Identity Verified
Ireland
Local time: 01:55
Member (2012)
English to Turkish
+ ...
Nov 15, 2015

Hi everybody,

Do you have an idea about how much value/difference does having a certificate or a diploma or an MA in Translation create, from perspectives of clients? In terms of cost-effectiveness analysis, is having a credential (such as 9 months education from the London City Unv) or a diploma enough for most clients? Is it still OK for clients, if we have it via distance learning?

Second, again from clients perspective, which one looks better, getting those credentials in my source or target language (from the universities in the source or target culture) ?

As a lateral entrant to translation, I wish get fill this gap using my time and resources wisely, without interrupting my business. So your feedback is crucial for me.

Thanks for your help in advance
Zeki

[Edited at 2015-11-15 14:08 GMT]


 

Sheila Wilson  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 01:55
Member (2007)
English
+ ...
What it boils down to Nov 15, 2015

Clients only need/want confidence in your ability to deal with their text. Employers will see things a little differently. So, distance learning probably wouldn't worry them at all. Language of studies? I think that would probably depend on what else you have to show them. Think about it.

If your client shares the target language, they will be in a position to evaluate your use of it. Even if they don't, if you're trannslating into your native language and you've lived all/most of your life in your native country then they'll probably assume you have a good command of it. However, if it's a highly technical text then you'll need the specific terminology. So a degree in the target language in the subject area would be very good news.

On the other hand, there's no point having a translation specialisation if you only know the terms in your target language. You need them in your source language too. And that's also the one that's hardest to prove, assuming it isn't your native language. It's also true that if your target language is your strongest language (as it should be), it will be easier to learn the equivalent terms in that language outside of university. This is perhaps particularly true with the major languages today, with Internet access.


 

Zeki Güler  Identity Verified
Ireland
Local time: 01:55
Member (2012)
English to Turkish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Pondering... Nov 15, 2015

Thank you Sheila,

I'm only translating into my native language (Turkish), not the vice versa.

And my clients are always foreign companies.

So, where do you think my destination should be ?


 

Sheila Wilson  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 01:55
Member (2007)
English
+ ...
Best for you personally? Nov 16, 2015

You're specifically looking for a qualification in translation? I'm surprised really. Looking at your profile, it seems as though you're already very well qualified. Don't you already have enough proof of your abilities and experience? You're a member of ATA, ITI and IAPTI - all for professionals. You've studied at a Turkish university (i.e. target language); you live in Ireland (i.e. source language); you have 13 years' experience. And for those who find you here, you've got the "P" to your name and you've won a competition. What else do your potential clients need? Are you sure they're looking for still more qualifications? I mean, many of us don't have anything much in the way of bits of paper, but it doesn't matter as our clients never ask for them (apart from some of the enormous ones who need every box ticked - and I don't want to work for them, personally).

The four things that seem to me to be the most appropriate, although they may not exist or be practicable, are:
- ATA certification exam
- DipTrans
- MA by distance learning
- a certificate awarded by a private company (I found mine really useful as well as affordable and not too onerous).

After 13 years doing the job, I really doubt that any are really necessary, but if it's you yourself who feels the need, perhaps to boost your confidence in your abilities, then why not? On the other hand, is it possible that you would benefit even more from a course on marketing yourself and/or running a business? The CCIs often hold very useful training sessions. If you're thinking of studying to improve your ability to get clients, then IMHO that would be a better route. Qualifications are great if you have nothing else to offer a client. If you have experience then you just need to sell your services. If you have both and you aren't getting enough work, you need to be looking elsewhere for the source of the problem.


 

Zeki Güler  Identity Verified
Ireland
Local time: 01:55
Member (2012)
English to Turkish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Because I'm a perfectionist Nov 16, 2015

I just wanted to fill this void in my career as a perfectionist.

However, I think you are right. I had better direct my time and efforts towards CPD programs, marketing etc.

Thanks for the recommendations.


 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Certificate/Diploma/MA, in source or target language?

Advanced search







memoQ translator pro
Kilgray's memoQ is the world's fastest developing integrated localization & translation environment rendering you more productive and efficient.

With our advanced file filters, unlimited language and advanced file support, memoQ translator pro has been designed for translators and reviewers who work on their own, with other translators or in team-based translation projects.

More info »
PerfectIt consistency checker
Faster Checking, Greater Accuracy

PerfectIt helps deliver error-free documents. It improves consistency, ensures quality and helps to enforce style guides. It’s a powerful tool for pro users, and comes with the assurance of a 30-day money back guarantee.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search