Dutch package leaflet - telephone number for poisonings!
Thread poster: Dr. Bettina Meissner

Dr. Bettina Meissner
Germany
Local time: 02:28
Member (2011)
English to German
+ ...
Oct 19, 2011

Hi,

I have noticed that in Dutch package leaflets (from Belgium) there is often an emergency number given for poisonings ("het Antigiftcentrum") that starts with "070...".

As I was translating into German and for the German market, I replaced this number by an emergency number for poisonings in Germany. As there're various numbers available in different towns, I took the one from Berlin.

My translation agency forwarded my translation to the client, who wanted more information/explanations (also a web link) why the number had been changed.

When I received the next translation, I left the Belgium number in the leaflet and provided a comment that this number was only working in Belgium (I had even tried this number once, in Germany and Switzerland, just to be sure. However, no questions or suggestions came back to me....

I've also noticed that there are many package leaflets on the internet - in German - offering this Belgium number for emergencies!

I'd really like to know how you're dealing with that kind of problem - ignore it (which saves time) or point it out to the client?

Looking forward to your comments...

[Edited at 2011-10-19 10:06 GMT]


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Catherine GUILLIAUMET  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:28
English to French
+ ...
Pointing it out ! Oct 19, 2011

Hi Bettina,

This is the typical example of the issues that I systematically point out to the client.

It may have serious consequences for patients !


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Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 02:28
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Would have pointed it out Oct 19, 2011

I reckon it would have been better to ask the customer to check it themselves, and not to touch the number in your delivered files. In these official details and numbers, the end customer always knows best.

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Dr. Bettina Meissner
Germany
Local time: 02:28
Member (2011)
English to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
@Catherine Oct 19, 2011

That's what I thought, too! But isn't it amazing, how many of these leaflets - which are otherwise well translated - are available on the internet with this wrong number?! Nobody seems to worry about it...

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Dr. Bettina Meissner
Germany
Local time: 02:28
Member (2011)
English to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
@Tomas Oct 19, 2011

For the future, I'll certainly do it like this, thanks!

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Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 02:28
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Maybe... Oct 19, 2011

Bettina Meissner wrote:
That's what I thought, too! But isn't it amazing, how many of these leaflets - which are otherwise well translated - are available on the internet with this wrong number?! Nobody seems to worry about it...

They prefer a dead consumer to an injured consumer, i.e. they ask you do call a number with a language you do not master...

Now seriously: I don't know whether these safety phone numbers in the rest of Europe are numbers of the chemical company, in which case it is possible that they centralise all the calls in one country, or an official number for your country/region. In the case of Spain, it is a nation-wide number for all manufacturers (the Instituto Nacional de Toxicología).


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Catherine GUILLIAUMET  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:28
English to French
+ ...
Terrible ! Oct 19, 2011

Bettina Meissner wrote:

That's what I thought, too! But isn't it amazing, how many of these leaflets - which are otherwise well translated - are available on the internet with this wrong number?! Nobody seems to worry about it...


Yes, it is even terrible. Sometimes, you wonder if the EMA and/or AFSSAPS Committees do read seriously the documentation before granting a marketing authorization


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Catherine GUILLIAUMET  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:28
English to French
+ ...
In France, "Centre Antipoison et de Toxicovigilance" Oct 19, 2011

Tomás Cano Binder, CT wrote:

Bettina Meissner wrote:
That's what I thought, too! But isn't it amazing, how many of these leaflets - which are otherwise well translated - are available on the internet with this wrong number?! Nobody seems to worry about it...

They prefer a dead consumer to an injured consumer, i.e. they ask you do call a number with a language you do not master...


excellent !


Now seriously: I don't know whether these safety phone numbers in the rest of Europe are numbers of the chemical company, in which case it is possible that they centralise all the calls in one country, or an official number for your country/region. In the case of Spain, it is a nation-wide number for all manufacturers (the Instituto Nacional de Toxicología).


In France, it is the "Centre antipoison et de toxicovigilance". The problem is that the phone number changes according to the region you live in. There's no national number yet.

For info, as it may be useful, who knows : http://www.centres-antipoison.net/


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Jacek Sierakowski
Belgium
Local time: 02:28
English to French
+ ...
German is an official language in Belgium. Oct 19, 2011

"I've also noticed that there are many package leaflets on the internet - in German - offering this Belgium number for emergencies!"

German is an official language in Belgium. Maybe these leaflets are Belgian.


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Dr. Bettina Meissner
Germany
Local time: 02:28
Member (2011)
English to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
@Jacek Oct 19, 2011

Very smart comment - I wasn't aware the leaflet might be for (German speaking) people living in Belgium....but I'm still worried, they will use the leaflet for the German market as well.

And look what I just found on the internet:

"...contact your doctor, your pharmacist or the Anti-Poison centre (070/245.245) immediately..."

I guess that English is no official language in Belgium)


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Siegfried Armbruster  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 02:28
Member (2004)
English to German
+ ...
Thanks for pointing out the obvious Oct 19, 2011

Jacek Sierakowski wrote:

German is an official language in Belgium. Maybe these leaflets are Belgian.


These leaflets are definitely for Belgium and the source language is normally not Dutch but Flemish. Having trilingual PILs is typical for Belgium.

No - they won't use these PILs for Germany and if they would, spotting and changing the phone number would be part of the national review process which is done per country and not per language.


[Edited at 2011-10-19 18:55 GMT]


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Dr. Bettina Meissner
Germany
Local time: 02:28
Member (2011)
English to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Problem solved Oct 19, 2011

Thank you Siegfried, now that you and Jacek are saying it, it all seems logical

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Kirsten Bodart  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:28
Dutch to English
+ ...
Not smart, just normal Oct 19, 2011

Jacek Sierakowski wrote:

"I've also noticed that there are many package leaflets on the internet - in German - offering this Belgium number for emergencies!"

German is an official language in Belgium. Maybe these leaflets are Belgian.


just normal.

No seriously, nice of the client to inform you that it is for the German or Belgian market (or maybe both) isn't it.

How are you supposed to smell that (as they say in Dutch/Flemish)?

I think they may be providing leaflets in English too now, just to make sure that the extensive EU-population around Brussels also understands...

And the language is really Dutch. I am not sure that really everyone on this forum would agree, but the law agrees and that is good enough for me.


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Dutch package leaflet - telephone number for poisonings!

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