Applying various rates: English to French + Displaying rates in profile?
Thread poster: Estelle Demontrond-Box

Estelle Demontrond-Box  Identity Verified
Australia
Local time: 22:33
Member (2005)
English to French
+ ...
Jul 26, 2009

Dear all,

I was browsing profiles out of curiosity in order to get a feel of current rates in the English to French pair and have noticed that
1) very few colleagues actually state their rates in their profile
2) it can vary a lot: 0.12 to 0.20 EUROs for instance

And I was wondering:

1) Though I have been looking for hours to find average figures/rates for translation in this pair, it has proved rather unsuccessful. Has anybody got links or docs covering this (but I mean RECENT figures!!!)
2) How do you decide, what are the criteria to apply different rates to different projects or clients?
3) WOuld you discourage stating clearly your rates on your profile or website?

I would really appreciate your suggestions on the matter!

Have a nice Sunday!

Estelle


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José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 09:33
English to Portuguese
+ ...
My views, though I work EN-PT Jul 26, 2009

Estelle Demontrond-Box wrote:
1) Though I have been looking for hours to find average figures/rates for translation in this pair, it has proved rather unsuccessful. Has anybody got links or docs covering this (but I mean RECENT figures!!!)


You have the Jobs | Rates page on Proz. As I understood, it calculates using ALL rates, including those chosen NOT to be displayed on profiles.

IMHO Proz should periodically give Browniz/Kudoz/whatever for people who e.g. quarterly updated/confirmed their rates. Just one of them at a time would be enough.

Estelle Demontrond-Box wrote:
2) How do you decide, what are the criteria to apply different rates to different projects or clients?


I have a standard per-word rate for translation, and some preset rates for other things as well. If anything else beyond plain text is required, I check if that will be costly on my side, or if I can treat it as added value.

Then I check the payment term. While I don't take any job paying beyond 30 days from delivery, COD or otherwise quick payment may either mean a discount, or some further added value at no charge.

The only job I ever took on a 45 or 60-day payment term was never paid, and the client vanished into thin air. This was a few years ago.

While I do my best to be ranked among the top translatirs in my pair/specialties, I'd be proud to be the most expensive money-lending instirution in the world.

Estelle Demontrond-Box wrote:
3) Would you discourage stating clearly your rates on your profile or website?


Yes. If your rates are too low, clients seeking quality will take you for an amateur or a sweat shop. If they are too high, you'll only be contacted about absurdly difficult jobs that nobody else will take for normal rates. Considering the globalized translation market, too low and too high, on top of being subjective assessments, can vary A LOT!

On the other hand, as a sworn/certified translator in Brazil, local law requires me to do such work at mandatory rates set by state government, and have such rates posted on the wall at my workplace.


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Astrid Elke Witte  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 14:33
Member (2002)
German to English
+ ...
Criteria for applying different rates Jul 28, 2009

Estelle Demontrond-Box wrote:

2) How do you decide, what are the criteria to apply different rates to different projects or clients?


First of all you ascertain what you should be earning in an hour. This does not need to be what other translators charge, but what you need to earn, and what is commonly earned, in your local community. You experiment and find out how many words you can translate per hour if you are sent a Word document of normal text. This gives you your normal word rate.

Now, to come back to the question of what criteria will change this normal rate:

Time is money. Anything that eats up your time, is labour intensive, has to cost more. Therefore, if you are sent a .pdf instead of a Word document, it often has to cost more, because you have to make it into a Word document before you can start. I often add on about 2 cents per word for a .pdf. At other times I charge for the Word document creation separately. Sometimes I do not charge extra at all, however, if it is a good copy without complex layout, that can be converted into a Word document in seconds with OCR software.

PowerPoint files cost more, because all that fiddling and formatting with the slides takes extra time.

Documents that pose legibility problems cost more - eye strain (might cost you a pair of glasses?), possible copy-typing....

Documents that involve a great deal of fiddling with tables and figures should cost a little extra.

Easy documents with a lot of repetition may, if you use a CAT tool, enable you to increase the number of words you translate per hour. In this case you are in a position to charge less per word, or give CAT tool discounts.

I hope this will put you in the picture a little.


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