Interpreting - Legal Services Commission rates
Thread poster: Jesús Marín Mateos

Jesús Marín Mateos  Identity Verified
Local time: 01:34
English to Spanish
+ ...
Jun 10, 2004

Dear colleagues,
This may sound strange but I am going to start doing interpreting work for a firm of solicitors in the UK and they have informed me that they will pay me according to the rates offered by the Legal Services Commission but will not say how much this is. When they offer me work I will have to invoce them per hour and they'll pay at this rate.
I suspect it may be a great deal or it may not be worth it at all and I was hoping any of you knows about this rates. I have visited the Legal Services Commission website but have found nothing about this. Any help would be very much appreciated.
Many thanks.


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italia  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 02:34
Italian to German
+ ...
contact the NRPSI Jun 10, 2004

Jesus Marin wrote:

Dear colleagues,
This may sound strange but I am going to start doing interpreting work for a firm of solicitors in the UK and they have informed me that they will pay me according to the rates offered by the Legal Services Commission but will not say how much this is. When they offer me work I will have to invoce them per hour and they'll pay at this rate.
I suspect it may be a great deal or it may not be worth it at all and I was hoping any of you knows about this rates. I have visited the Legal Services Commission website but have found nothing about this. Any help would be very much appreciated.
Many thanks.



Jesus, As far as I know in order to be able to work for court and public institutions in the UK you must be registered with the NRPSI.
However, you can only become a member if you are a qualified Public Service Interpreter having done the DPSI (Diploma in Public Service Interpreting).
FYI here's some info on the above metioned institution. Maybe by addressing them you could get more details.

What is the National Register of Public Service Interpreters?
Public service interpreters, as the name implies, are interpreters who work in the context of public services, such as legal and health services and local government related services, which include housing, education, welfare, environmental health and social services

The National Register of Public Service Interpreters is a professional register. Like other professional registers, it comprises individuals who have satisfied selection criteria in terms of qualifications and experience, agreed to abide by a code of conduct and are subject to disciplinary procedures where there are allegations that the code has been breached.

The register is administered by NRPSI Ltd, a wholly owned and non-profit making subsidiary of the Institute of Linguists. The Institute of Linguists is the UK’s largest language professional body and was established in 1910.

The aim of the National Register is twofold:
to provide national access to professional interpreters by the public services, where they do not fully share a common language with a client or clients
to provide a system for linguists to make their services available to the public services.
The reasons why the National Register was established arose from the:
the multi-lingual nature of modern British Society
the legal and good practice requirements that the public services should provide equal and effective services to each individual, irrespective of language and culture. Reliable communication, where a language is not fully shared, is a basic pre-requisite for that to happen.
risk to both public services, and their clients, of employing unqualified interpreters and of asking family members, fellow patients, co-defendants and children to act as interpreters.
need for quality assurance systems. Public service contexts demand reliable, safe service provision. People who need interpreters are, by definition, unable to assess the interpreter’s competence for themselves. It is essential that interpreters have prior training and that objective assessment of their skills and commitment to professional codes have been made in a rigorous way.
need for a nationally consistent professional structure for public service interpreters, to allow:
access to interpreters in a range of languages, including ones which may not be available locally
access to interpreters from outside a local area, where employing a local one may be inappropriate e.g. in domestic disputes in a small language community
public service interpreters to earn professional recognition
coherent growth and development for interpreters, and inter-disciplinary approaches to coherent working practices and collaboration.
Developments and growth envisaged
The Register is currently made up of the names and contact details of 1500 public service interpreters (PSI's) in 83 languages. Members of the public service disciplines will recall the birth of their own professions, and how they did not emerge fully-fledged in a short space of time. NRPSI Ltd is endeavouring to meet responsibly a pressing social need as quickly as possible, without jeopardising quality and standards.

The Register was established on the basis of ten years’ collaborative development work with the public services. NRPSI Ltd welcomes an on-going collaboration with them, with other-language-speaking groups and with fellow linguists.

Among the improvements envisaged are:

increasing the number of registered interpreters, the range of languages and the geographical spread
access to the Register through a secure web-site
establishing mechanisms for Continuing Professional Development of interpreters.
How public services can obtain copies of the Register
The National Register of Public Service Interpreters is available by subscription in an easy to use CD-Rom format and a ring bound binder. Click on the following link for further information on subscription.

Funding
The NRPSI is a not-for-profit organisation and is currently funded solely by subscriptions and interpreters’ fees. The Board Directors act in a voluntary capacity and only receive travel expenses.

Advisory Groups
Advisory groups have been set up to maintain and raise standards in the administration of the Register, to identify and address concerns relating to it, and to facilitate its aims. Each group is chaired by a member of the NRPSI Board. The Legal Services Advisory Group was set up as one of a number of concrete steps in the criminal justice sector (CJS) to ensure that only properly qualified and experienced interpreters are commissioned. It comprises representatives of the major agencies in the CJS and has provided valuable information and expert feedback on issues concerning interpreting in all stages of criminal justice work. Other advisory groups have also met periodically over the years, namely a Public Services Advisory Group for health and local government sectors, and an Interpreters Advisory Group to identify issues of particular concern to interpreters.

For further details, please contact nrpsi@iol.org.uk



GOOD LUCK!!!!



[Edited at 2004-06-10 23:24]


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Jesús Marín Mateos  Identity Verified
Local time: 01:34
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
No NRPSI Jun 10, 2004

Dear Italia,
Many thanks for all the information but what I am talking about does not have anything to do with the NRPSI. I am aware that the NRPSI is where interpreters are generally pulled from but this is not the case.
Besides I am talking about interpreting at the solicitors premises, not at court or anything.
The Legal Services Commission is something completely different....NRPSI interpreters are probably paid at their rate but not only them....
Thank you anyway.


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Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 18:34
English to Spanish
+ ...
Insist Jun 11, 2004

Either insist that they tell you how much up front, or else try it once and find out after the fact.

Then decide if you like it or not.


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Narasimhan Raghavan  Identity Verified
Local time: 06:04
English to Tamil
+ ...
Beware of smooth talking clients Jun 12, 2004

Henry is right. Do insist on clearing up the matter beforehand. The client is sure to know the rates.
Regards,
N.Raghavan


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Mimi McQuaid
Local time: 19:34
Spanish to English
+ ...
legal aid payment rates Jul 30, 2004

hi javier,

if you are talking about the legal aid rate, which is the general standard used by solicitors in criminal/immigration cases, in my experience it is £15/hr interpreting time, £12 travel/waiting. You can insist on a minimum payment, 2 hours is quite normal, but some solicitors don't like this...

M.


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