Rate for a spanish-english translation economy
Thread poster: Rocío Caparrós Sánchez
Rocío Caparrós Sánchez
English to Spanish
+ ...
Jul 13, 2004

Hello everybody

My name is Rocio Caparros. I'm Spanish, and I'm going to do my first translation. It's a text of 20 pages about Economy.
The translation is from Spanish into English.
Could anyone tell me what is the rate per word of this kind of translation, please?
Please, I would like to know the price in Euros.

Thank you very much.


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Juan Jacob  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 02:08
French to Spanish
+ ...
Have a look into ProZ profiles. Jul 14, 2004

Rocío, mira bien todos los "profiles" de los colegas y te darás una buena idea de cuánto cobrar... ahora bien, eres novata, ¿no? Toma también eso en consideración.
Saludos, y suerte con tu primera traducción.


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Susana Galilea  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 02:08
English to Spanish
+ ...
first translation... Jul 14, 2004

...and you are working into a language that is not your mother tongue?

Do you have any quality controls in place, such as a native speaker reviewing your work?

I know this was not your question, and I apologize if I am meddling or out of line. I see no mention in your profile that you translate into English.

With all due respect, I would seriously consider whether this is the right project to make your debut with. Perhaps other colleagues will be more supportive.

Best luck either way,

Susana Galilea
Accredited Translator EUTI
sgalilea@ispwest.com
www.accentonspanish.com


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Trudy Peters  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 03:08
German to English
+ ...
Fully agree Jul 14, 2004

with Susana. Well-put.

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Russell Gillis  Identity Verified
Local time: 01:08
Spanish to English
Also agree with Susana Jul 14, 2004

As one that works in Spanish-English, I have to warn you of the dangers of translating into your second language.

If you want to keep this agency/client for the long haul, you will either have a native translator check your work, or refer the outsourcer to someone else.

Red flags were already going up in my head just by reading the title of this posting. You would either say "a translation on the Economy" or "a translation on Economics".

As far as rates, just do a search under Directory\Freelancers for your language combination. After looking through a few profiles you should get an idea.

However, I would allow for an extra amount for proofreading. Proofreading rates are typically 1/4 of translation rates.

As this is your first job, think it over carefully!

Best regards,

Russell


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Parrot  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 09:08
Member (2002)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Can't help but agree with Susana and Russell Jul 14, 2004

If it's the client who sends the text for proofing, you could get into trouble.

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xxxLia Fail  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 09:08
Spanish to English
+ ...
Agree with others - it's not your native language Jul 14, 2004

And only in exceptional circumstances and with an exceptionally high level of English, and even then with someone to check over your work, should you consider translating into English.

There are stacks of translators doing that combination, so it's hardly a question of a shortage of translators (as happens with unusual language combinations, or highly technical translations, where a non-native expert will do a better job that a native non-expert - but whose work should be linguistically checked anyway).

Often it's because the client is ignorant (in the sense of not knowing) about what's involved in translation, and simply assumes that 'knowledge' of a second language is enough (a very common misperception). But translation is about more than 'knowing' a second language. As an example of an ignorant client, today I saw an ad for a translator, specifying BUP or COU (Spanish pre-university level) as the educational level required. Surely a translator needs to know a bit more about BOTH language AND translation to be able to produce a text that does NOT read like a translation?

And surely it's a big help being a native when trying to produce a coherent text in the target language. A non-native may understand their source text 100% but what's the point if you can´t tranmit its meanings and subtleties in the target language?

One thing is reading and enjoying a poem. But how many of us could write a poem that didn't make others cringe on reading it? Same with translation........


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Paul Lambert  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 00:08
French to English
+ ...
I would have to agree with the others... Jul 14, 2004

Hola Rocio,

I'm afraid I have to agree with the other postings here. I would, however, like to point out that this is in no way a reflection on your ability as a translator. I have been speaking Spanish since I was 3 years old, and am now about to turn 26, but would never consider translating into Spanish. Sometimes, I find it difficult enough to find a certain word or turn of phrase in English, never mind Spanish - I have sometimes had to spend hours over a particular sentence, constantly leaving it and coming back to it until it sounds perfect in English. The very thought of having to do that in a language which is not my mother tongue makes my stomach churn!!!!!

As Ailish explained, translation is as much about style and producing a polished text as it is about knowing another language. I think, as well, that you will find it a lot easier to progress in the translation world if you start on something you feel comfortable with. I once had a colleague who, due to a shortage of translators in her language pair, was often forced to translate out of her mother tongue and into French and English. She hated it, and ended up giving up translation as a career. Just something to think about....most of us are in translation for the love of it, so why risk losing that passion and drive which, as a translator, I'm sure you have?

Buena suerte,

Pablito ;0)


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RafaLee
Australia
Local time: 17:08
Spanish to English
+ ...
Good luck! Jul 14, 2004

As English is not your first language, get a native speaker to proofread your work!

BUena Suerte!!

Rafa


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xxxLia Fail  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 09:08
Spanish to English
+ ...
Economically viable? Jul 17, 2004

RafaLee wrote:

As English is not your first language, get a native speaker to proofread your work!

BUena Suerte!!

Rafa


To be honest, this represents a semi-duplication of effort, and who pays for the additional cost? It's not as if there weren't stacks of native EN translators for this combination and subject area!


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Nelson Agelvis
Local time: 03:08
Spanish to English
+ ...
Unless you are NATIVE in English, hand it over to someone who is! Jul 17, 2004

Hermano, I translate both ways (EN-SP/SP-EN), and I tell you, don't let this be your first translation unless you handle English "natively", and you have knowledge of Economics. It's better to hand it over to a qualified translator and get a commision, say one cent or half-cent per word depending on what he charges. Take a look at how he does it, and if you feel that you can do it the same or better, then the next SP-EN translation you get is all yours. I repeat, DO NOT BLOW YOUR FIRST JOB,'CAUSE THERE MIGHT NOT BE A SECOND.

Deseándote suerte desde Caracas,Venezuela
Nelson


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