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What are your suggestions for increasing decent business?
Thread poster: Bernhard Sulzer

Bernhard Sulzer  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 00:56
English to German
+ ...
Jul 12, 2013

I ask myself often what the consequences are for myself of those rock bottom offers that ultimately do go to someone who accepts them.

Here's an example I have seen before:

a translation company in a large country known for producing a lot of stuff cheaply offers to pay USD .03/word for a technical translation (more than 15,000 words)

Language combination: English>German.
Translators interested: at least 9 within an hour

What I am concerned about is that I know someone will do it, and the job will go to someone who needs that text done professionally.

I have up until now believed that the result will be a bad translation, and that it will have to be redone for more money later.

The thing is, this keeps happening all the time, seemingly with no end in sight.

My problem is that these are jobs that are taken away from professional translators. You can argue that in the end, there had to be an offer out there to fix this text, and so, in the long run, it will not have too much of an effect on the overall volume of available translation jobs that pay a decent price, and thus, on your income.

But I am not so sure about that anymore. The overall trend is certainly stagnant or downward, especially as far as it relates to agency offers.


What is your own experience?

Can you attest to fewer new job offers with decent fees and an increased number of job offers that expect you to work for less and less? If that is the case, my suspicion is that it does have to do with the constant flow of cheap jobs that are being offered, more and more agencies springing up especially in low-income countries trying to take advantage of the market and not budging on their ridiculous rates.

In other words, translators overall are and probably have to give in to a trend. But how long can that continue without compromising your lifelihood, especially if you don't have a solid client base or are new in the business?


While my example above is not from a direct contact, I cannot say I have an easy time convincing even new direct clients to pay a decent rate. That is not to say exceptions don't exist. I have a few excellent clients. And hopefully, they will not start thinking - well, we can get the same thing cheaper from someone else.

I understand that money is tight everywhere but you know, business is going on as usual globally, and money is being made. Trust me.

So, what are your suggestions to counter a trend that is there, what are a few suggestions to convince your clients to give the job to you for adequate rates, not unrealistic ones?

I might now include a little text with all my replies and applications warning of consequences of expecting to pay prices that are completely unacceptable for a professional job. But wouldn't that look pretty desperate? I will do another campaign contacting businesses directly that might need translations or their translated websites "fixed".


As far as agencies are concerned, I have almost given up on them.

Sometimes I feel like a balloon, and I am losing more and more air.

Your opinions and suggestions are welcome. I hope enough people care to respond.

B

[Edited at 2013-07-12 16:38 GMT]


 

LilianNekipelov  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 00:56
Russian to English
+ ...
This is really what happens. I noticed it a long time ago. Jul 12, 2013

Bad translation will eventually have a quite tragic impact on certain things -- most equipment will stop functioning properly -- even now there are certain equipment, even airplane engine malfunctions which have no apparent reasons -- perhaps translations have to be also taken into account in such cases, when conducting an investigation. The same with drugs, and medical equipment.

The only way to get more work for regular type of money is to try to find direct clients -- big car manufactures, and other companies, if you do technical translation among other things. These companies pay really well.

[Edited at 2013-07-12 17:14 GMT]


 

Gül Kaya  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:56
Turkish to English
+ ...
Perennial problem Jul 12, 2013

Bernard I share your concerns, and I think that just about all translators based in the industrialised west will share them too. The problem is as old as the hills and I doubt it will ever change, at least not in my lifetime: we need more to live and pay the bills than people living elsewhere. It's just geo-economics. So we keep getting battered at this rates game. I was one month into my Proz membership when I decided I was never going to get anywhere bidding for jobs, so I gave up on that pretty sharpish. I like and use Proz for lots of things but getting good jobs isn't one of them.

I've definitely noticed a downwards trend this year in particular. This trend is invariably fuelled by agencies. The only exception is clients with whom I have already successfully collaborated. My "regulars" are happy to come back to me and accept my rates. With new agencies however, they invariably start off with "no that's too high" and try to beat me down. It's getting all very predictable with them. Every now and then though there's a gem that shines through and I think that helps to keep you going.

As an aside has anyone else noticed that this downwards trend seems to be accompanied by an increase in paperwork agencies want and demand. Just how many forms are we expected to fill in these days? If the first thing an agency does is send me a zip file of 5 forms to fill in, print out, sign, date, scan and send, then I'm just totally put off by it. And that's even before you've agreed to the job. I can't cope with any form filling anymore.


 

IrimiConsulting  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 06:56
Member (2006)
English to Swedish
+ ...
Stay away from consumer products associated with low costs Jul 12, 2013

I tend to decline offers for jobs in home electronics or similar. Such products are geared towards end consumers (i.e. not for commercial purposes) and there is always pricing wars going on. IT is slightly better as long as it's not PCs.

Another example is the automotive industry. Documentation for heavy vehicles tend to be more lucrative because they are almost exclusively used commercially, they are expensive to develop and buy, and their longevity (often 15+ years) makes it more feasible to spend extra money on the documentation. Automobile documentation pays less because they are bought by consumers, the price and pricing wars are lower and they are not used commercially to any large extent.

I specialise in medicine and medical devices. Extensive documentation/traceability requirements, often expensive equipment, quality can literally save lives. This means that the chances for high translation rates are better.


 

Balasubramaniam L.  Identity Verified
India
Local time: 10:26
English to Hindi
+ ...
Not my experience Jul 13, 2013

To several of your questions, my answer would be no. For example:

Can you attest to fewer new job offers with decent fees and an increased number of job offers that expect you to work for less and less?


No, I don't see that trend at all. I have not only maintained my rate but with some clients have also managed to increase them, without any negative effect on my earnings or portfolio of clients.

In other words, translators overall are and probably have to give in to a trend. But how long can that continue without compromising your lifelihood, especially if you don't have a solid client base or are new in the business?


Not necessarily. That is the beauty of freelancing. You don't have to give in to anything. No one is forcing you to take up those ridiculously low rate jobs. The simple expediency of refusing them will solve the problem.

The advise I can give, and which have been given by better minds than me (please see the links below), is to move up the chain. Don't compete with the bottom-feeders, you can't and still aspire to a decent lifestyle, especially in a costly country like the US. Get the quality-conscious clients for whom price is not the over-riding criterion, and a well done translation is of priceless worth to them. Specialize in a few areas and demonstrate your capabilities in these areas. Get direct clients and reduce your dependence on secondary work received from agencies. If you must rely on agencies, try to get work from the top-notch agencies. Leave the 3 cent guys well alone, it is not worth spoiling your sleep over them.

http://thoughtsontranslation.com/2013/06/11/a-couple-of-freelance-tips/

http://thoughtsontranslation.com/2013/03/12/why-do-some-freelance-translators-fail/

(this post has generated a lively discussion, don't miss it, particularly the comments by the greats like Chris Durban)

http://translationjournal.net/journal/06xlation.htm
(This is just a sample, you should read all the Bottom Lines in this journal. Very sound practical advice for translators. The content of this column (one of authors of this column is Chris Durban herself) is also available in a book form, which you can think of procuring -

http://www.amazon.com/The-Prosperous-Translator-Chris-Durban/dp/0615404030


[Edited at 2013-07-13 02:32 GMT]


 

Bernhard Sulzer  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 00:56
English to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
my theory Jul 13, 2013

LilianBNekipelo wrote:

Bad translation will eventually have a quite tragic impact on certain things -- most equipment will stop functioning properly -- even now there are certain equipment, even airplane engine malfunctions which have no apparent reasons -- perhaps translations have to be also taken into account in such cases, when conducting an investigation. The same with drugs, and medical equipment.


I have a theory, Lilian, but it's just that, a theory.

I have a minimum rate and I will not go below it, and trust me, it's not unreasonable at all. If that were the attitude of every professional, then the work performed for lower rates would, by definition, be unprofessional, which I take as being of poor quality.
This would have a snowball effect. The clients will eventually rebel and complain about the poor quality and return to pay more (even for an automobile manual - I do use mine, for example, and would be more than disappointed if it were poorly written - see IrimiConsulting's entry). So, in theory there should come a time then where this cycle of ever lower rates will bottom out and rates will pick up again.
Question is, how long is it going to take and is there something we can do about it?

Now keep in mind that my language combination is (US) English German, and that I am not living in a low-income, low-wage or low-expense country. And I don't believe any professional translator working with these languages really does, especially in the combination (US) English German. But there are these people out there accepting the low-rate jobs, often posted by agencies in far-away and low-income countries, but I've seen USD .05/word jobs all over the place from agencies in the industrial world.

Even if my theory is wrong and all the people who work for unacceptably low rates keep working until they run out of money because they can't pay their bills and a new generation of eager lowbies takes over and works for ever lower rates but maybe for shorter and shorter periods of time (because they'll run out of money ever more quickly), and even if this whole spiel doesn't bottom out for another 50 years, I am not going to let myself get pressured into this race into the ground. I rather find a new profession.

But, as I said, there might be ways for us to get decent business. I believe we all agree that contacting direct clients is one very important strategy. "How to convince a client" to pay you that decent rate for good work will be the most important factor and it will mean more than simply showing off one's resume.

B


 

Bernhard Sulzer  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 00:56
English to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
I don't live in a developing country Jul 13, 2013

Balasubramaniam L. wrote:

To several of your questions, my answer would be no. For example:



Bernhard Sulzer wrote:
Can you attest to fewer new job offers with decent fees and an increased number of job offers that expect you to work for less and less?


Balasubramaniam L. wrote:
No, I don't see that trend at all. I have not only maintained my rate but with some clients have also managed to increase them, without any negative effect on my earnings or portfolio of clients.


Well, I am not sure if your case is typical for the experience colleagues in my language group have. You do live in a low-income country and that's where all the jobs seem to be headed, at least agency jobs. I can imagine that you get more jobs INTO English because you can work for less money. And into Hindi is probably picking up too because of greater industrial development in your country. But why should I work for a company in India in my language direction for say USD .03/word?!

Bernhard Sulzer wrote:
In other words, translators overall are and probably have to give in to a trend. But how long can that continue without compromising your lifelihood, especially if you don't have a solid client base or are new in the business?


Balasubramaniam L. wrote:
Not necessarily. That is the beauty of freelancing. You don't have to give in to anything. No one is forcing you to take up those ridiculously low rate jobs. The simple expediency of refusing them will solve the problem.


I agree that "I don't have to give in to anything, no one is forcing me (except myself).

But simply refusing low rate offers is not going to pay my bills. And suggestions for finding decent translation jobs is what I was trying to get with this posting.

Balasubramaniam L. wrote:
The advise I can give, and which have been given by better minds than me (please see the links below), is to move up the chain. Don't compete with the bottom-feeders, you can't and still aspire to a decent lifestyle, especially in a costly country like the US. Get the quality-conscious clients for whom price is not the over-riding criterion, and a well done translation is of priceless worth to them. Specialize in a few areas and demonstrate your capabilities in these areas. Get direct clients and reduce your dependence on secondary work received from agencies. If you must rely on agencies, try to get work from the top-notch agencies. Leave the 3 cent guys well alone, it is not worth spoiling your sleep over them.


Your advice or at least your thoughts are appreciated, but they are not telling us HOW to do it and since you are not living in the US or Germany, I don't expect you to. One HOW you do mention is trying to get work from top-notch agencies. I believe you are suggesting to contact them directly and show them samples of your work, your credentials, degrees, experience etc. Just did that. I still have to find an agency that pays more than a low rate that stays the same for years and years. They are only going to pay you more when they need something done ASAP and are running out of options.

B


 

Balasubramaniam L.  Identity Verified
India
Local time: 10:26
English to Hindi
+ ...
Exactly Jul 13, 2013

Bernhard Sulzer wrote:

Well, I am not sure if your case is typical for the experience colleagues in my language group have. You do live in a low-income country and that's where all the jobs seem to be headed, at least agency jobs. I can imagine that you get more jobs INTO English because you can work for less money.


Nope, I almost exclusively work into Hindi, and I don't work for less money. I charge the topmost rate for the topmost quality of translation I provide.

I believe you are suggesting to contact them directly and show them samples of your work, your credentials, degrees, experience etc. Just did that. I still have to find an agency that pays more than a low rate that stays the same for years and years. They are only going to pay you more when they need something done ASAP and are running out of options.


Exaclty.

That is exactly what you should be doing. Contact clients directly. This is the advice that Chris Durban gives in very clear terms, and she is a 6 figure earner. She says, get out of your office and lurk in places where your potential clients are to be found - trade fairs, conferences, their offices... and judiciously approach them with well-thought out proposals.

But your problem seems to be your negative mind-set. Unless you get out of it and start believing in yourself, no amount of good advice will be of any help to you.

[Edited at 2013-07-13 04:21 GMT]


 

Bernhard Sulzer  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 00:56
English to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
strategies Jul 13, 2013

Balasubramaniam L. wrote:

Nope, I almost exclusively work into Hindi, and I don't work for less money. I charge the topmost rate for the topmost quality of translation I provide.


I don't mean to quarrel, Balasubramaniam but I did say that the jobs "in my language direction" seem to be moving far away. And that's great that you get a lot of work into Hindi, but that is to be expected as I argued above.

Balasubramaniam L. wrote:
But your problem seems to be your negative mind-set. Unless you get out of it and start believing in yourself, no amount of good advice will be of any help to you.


Can we keep it on a professional level, please. The discussion is meant to help us all apply more winning strategies. But you got to accept certain facts even if you have a positive mindset. Don't belittle me.

B


 

Balasubramaniam L.  Identity Verified
India
Local time: 10:26
English to Hindi
+ ...
What makes you think it has not been at a professional level so far Jul 13, 2013

Bernhard Sulzer wrote:
Can we keep it on a professional level, please. The discussion is meant to help us all apply more winning strategies. But you got to accept certain facts even if you have a positive mindset. Don't belittle me.


Sorry, I must question you on this. What makes you think it has not been at a professional level so far?

I clearly see that your attitude is the key problem. And by pointing that out (may be bluntly, but often that works to shake people out of their wrong attitudes), I am providing you my professional advice.

It has been my professional experience that when ever I have approached my problems with a positive attitude I have succeeded. I have shared this experience with you, for what it is worth to you, take it or leave it.


 

Bernhard Sulzer  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 00:56
English to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
? Jul 13, 2013

Balasubramaniam L. wrote:

I clearly see that your attitude is the key problem. And by pointing that out (may be bluntly, but often that works to shake people out of their wrong attitudes), I am providing you my professional advice.


Excuse me?

[Edited at 2013-07-13 08:08 GMT]


 

Sarai Pahla (MD) MBChB
Germany
Local time: 06:56
Member (2012)
Japanese to English
+ ...
I'm not sure Jul 13, 2013

Bernhard Sulzer wrote:
Can you attest to fewer new job offers with decent fees and an increased number of job offers that expect you to work for less and less? If that is the case, my suspicion is that it does have to do with the constant flow of cheap jobs that are being offered, more and more agencies springing up especially in low-income countries trying to take advantage of the market and not budging on their ridiculous rates.


We share a language pair, and while I don't currently live in a developed country, the cost of living here and taxes are relatively high - to give a concrete example, if I made less than 2000 EUR a month, I would be really struggling to make ends meet.

On the other hand, I'm moving to Germany in a few months and I'm told that manual labourers earn about 1500 EUR per month (unskilled workers), so I would assume that a good target income for a single translator would be about 4000 EUR per month (correct me if I am wrong) before tax. To earn 4000 EUR a word at 0.04 EUR, which Google claims is equivalent to 0.05 USD, means translating 100 000 words a month, which is about 4500 words a day.

I personally wouldn't be comfortable with that arrangement at all. My suspicion, however, is that the problem is less that business is moving to low-income countries and more that translators themselves, irrespective of where they live, are more readily accepting low rates because they don't know what low rates *are*. I've noticed that most new translators struggle to get advice on rates at all and will thus accept anything they can get - a cursory glance through the forums and reading profiles of other translators will show you that there are more than enough translators in Europe charging your stated 0.05 USD per word - could be because they don't know any better, or because they want to be "competitive", or because they live in "low-income" countries in Europe, where the cost of living is even lower than here... so for the record, I'd call an agency rate of less than 0.05 USD per word very low. I'd call 0.10 USD standard for strong language pair, and 0.15 USD standard for a rare language pair. That's just my personal impression - others may disagree.

But back to your question - if you're talking about job offers simply appearing on ProZ, I respond to very few, as only a handful are jobs that I would want to do. I tend to contact agencies directly after having done a bit of background reading on them, and tell them what my rates are. Yes, there are some who say that my rates are far too high - but I simply don't work for them.

I'm also a little confused - are you saying that rates in other language pairs are pushing down rates in your language pair, or that rates in your language pair are being pushed down directly by agencies in other countries? If by agencies in other countries - don't work for them, concentrate your efforts more locally. Direct your applications appropriately. Read up on online marketing and sales techniques. Ask other successful translators in your field how they managed to get the jobs that they are doing now, but single them out and ask them directly.


 

Bernhard Sulzer  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 00:56
English to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
contributing factors Jul 13, 2013

Sarai Pahla wrote:
I would assume that a good target income for a single translator would be about 4000 EUR per month (correct me if I am wrong) before tax. To earn 4000 EUR a word at 0.04 EUR, which Google claims is equivalent to 0.05 USD, means translating 100 000 words a month, which is about 4500 words a day.

I personally wouldn't be comfortable with that arrangement at all.


Yes, EUR 0.04 is ridiculous and so is working like crazy, especially if it involves a skill that should pay way more.

Sarai Pahla wrote:
My suspicion, however, is that the problem is less that business is moving to low-income countries and more that translators themselves, irrespective of where they live, are more readily accepting low rates because they don't know what low rates *are*.
I've noticed that most new translators struggle to get advice on rates at all and will thus accept anything they can get - a cursory glance through the forums and reading profiles of other translators will show you that there are more than enough translators in Europe charging your stated 0.05 USD per word - could be because they don't know any better, or because they want to be "competitive", or because they live in "low-income" countries in Europe, where the cost of living is even lower than here...


Naiveté and newbies scrambling for jobs are probably important contributing factors. So are scrupulous agencies. Pointing out the consequences of translators' actions here in the forums might be one way to increase awareness of what is going on.

I wouldn't think that a German translator would want to move to a low-income country to make a living there by charging less, I would rather expect to keep charging the same good rate and save money that way.

I also believe that location is overrated. It really shouldn't matter that much where you live - you should be able to get a rate that reflects your good work, skill. and experience. And it looks like it won't matter much soon where you live because agencies will soon pay you even less than now (or at least not more), no matter where they are located. There are simply too many of them and they won't stop undercutting each other, and they use the eager translators to do it.

Sarai Pahla wrote:
But back to your question - if you're talking about job offers simply appearing on ProZ, I respond to very few, as only a handful are jobs that I would want to do. I tend to contact agencies directly after having done a bit of background reading on them, and tell them what my rates are. Yes, there are some who say that my rates are far too high - but I simply don't work for them.


Although I gave an example from the job board above, I am not just talking about jobs offered here or at other portals. I am talking about a general trend. If some people tell me about all those nice high-paying niches that exist, I am sure that they don't have much to do with agencies. But the fact that agencies simply get the majority of available translation jobs from potential clients means that fewer decent jobs are available to translators. That's where the change has to occur.

Sarai Pahla wrote:
I'm also a little confused - are you saying that rates in other language pairs are pushing down rates in your language pair, or that rates in your language pair are being pushed down directly by agencies in other countries? If by agencies in other countries - don't work for them, concentrate your efforts more locally. Direct your applications appropriately. Read up on online marketing and sales techniques. Ask other successful translators in your field how they managed to get the jobs that they are doing now, but single them out and ask them directly.


I believe, yes, all language pairs and the rates paid especially by agencies are having an ever/b> (edited, 7 13) bigger effect in the market place. If one language combination rate dwindles, another will certainly follow soon.

And thanks for your suggestions; been there, done that and doing it again.
This is not so much about me personally than it is about all of us.

The market rates are going down because of the reasons I mentioned, and I refuse to believe that other colleagues are not going to be affected in some way.
And I find it hard to believe that anyone can always just live off fantastic rates (well maybe some do) but that many of us have good, pretty bad, and rather ugly (stay away from them) customers to make a living.

I think more than anything else, my post is an awareness campaign. Even if you are a successful translator, be aware of the changes. I don't want you to spill any secrets of success if you're afraid of that. But there aren't many. Persistence, flexibility , expertise, and inventive measures are key in any job and life circumstance.
Thanks for your input.

B


[Edited at 2013-07-14 01:24 GMT]


 

Christophe Delaunay  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 06:56
Member (2011)
Spanish to French
+ ...
Bernard & Balasubramaniam, no offense to any of you two but... Jul 13, 2013

instead of going through a long somewhat acidic discussion exchange, why don't you start by telling each other (or here) what you simply charge? I do think you are not talking about the same thing... like for example the minimum salary is around 752€ in Spain but around 1461€ in France! How can a Spaniard and a French person see the world the same way?
It's high time we start being open about this money matter. I thought it was rather a French problem but I now see that it is quite a global problem. Money and the shame that goes with it!
CD


 

Sarai Pahla (MD) MBChB
Germany
Local time: 06:56
Member (2012)
Japanese to English
+ ...
More thoughts Jul 13, 2013

[quote]Bernhard Sulzer wrote:

Yes, EUR 0.04 is ridiculous and so is working like crazy, especially if it involves a skill that should pay way more.[quote]

True, but at the end of the day, I think the final figure counts more than the little figures in between.

Bernhard Sulzer wrote:
I wouldn't think that a German translator would want to move to a low-income country to make a living there by charging less, I would rather expect to keep charging the same good rate and save money that way.


By that same token, I don't see why someone living in India would want to earn 2000 EUR when they could be earning 4000 EUR... that makes no sense to me. I get the impression that the rest of the world thinks that only people in developed countries are ambitious or have a high cost of living - you do go on to say that location is overrated, but clearly location plays a major role in creating prejudices or assumptions. Could be just my view.

Also, I don't see many Germans moving to countries with higher incomes than theirs to make a living there by charging more either. There are quite a few within easy reach.

Bernhard Sulzer wrote:
And it looks like it won't matter much soon where you live because agencies will soon pay you even less than now (or at least not more), no matter where they are located. There are simply too many of them and they won't stop undercutting each other, and they use the eager translators to do it.


That's not something that is wrong with the translation industry, that is a reality of business. This is happening in every industry and has been happening in some form or another since the beginning of sales. Maximise profits while minimising costs.
In my view, translators should be prepared to take on more of the tasks that agencies take care of now in order to get a bigger slice of the pie - agencies make our lives easier because they source clients but don't give us any actual contact with them. We could cut out the middle man if we wanted to, but I know that, in my case, finding direct clients in my area of speciality is much more difficult here because of where I am located.


Bernhard Sulzer wrote:
If some people tell me about all those nice high-paying niches that exist, I am sure that they don't have much to do with agencies.


More importantly is the question, what do you think is high-paying? 10 000 EUR a month before tax? 20 000 EUR? 50 000 EUR? I personally don't think I will ever earn 50 000 EUR per month as a translator, it simply sounds ridiculous. I would like to get to 10 000 EUR a month before tax, but I think that would take another 5 to 10 years, because I would have to go through more training and certification before I have proof that I am as good as I say I am. Or enough experience to be trusted to be as good as I say I am.


Bernhard Sulzer wrote:
But the fact that agencies simply get the majority of available translation jobs from potential clients means that fewer decent jobs are available to translators.


I really disagree with this. Agencies get more because they have more people to do the work and they spend more money on marketing, promotion, advertising, etc. than the average translator does. They are willing to say "Yes" whenever you ask them, be available at all ungodly hours of the day or night, and find you a wide variety of services - translators don't all do that. In fact, one translator simply could not do that. It is an unrealistic expectation. If we want to "compete" with agencies in the market, we have to understand what they do differently to translators.

Bernhard Sulzer wrote:
I believe, yes, all language pairs and the rates paid especially by agencies are having an even bigger effect in the market place. If one language combination rate dwindles, another will certainly follow soon.


I think we need to be focusing more on what the agencies are charging than what they are paying. How much are they getting from the end client and how can I get in on that action? I also think that some agencies that charge clients low rates may potentially provide low quality because they can't afford to get the best translators. End clients are going to use that document to communicate. If the translation is poor quality, I have faith that someone will tell them in one way or another. I mean, as someone who translates to and from German, can you imagine what would happen if an end client like a corporate executive received a bad quality "into" German translation? If they didn't say anything about it, that would really surprise me. Perhaps they would terminate the working relationship insteadicon_biggrin.gif

Bernhard Sulzer wrote:
And I find it hard to believe that anyone can always just live off fantastic rates (well maybe some do) but that many of us have good, pretty bad, and rather ugly (stay away from them) customers to make a living.


I still want to know what you mean by "fantastic rates" - I can't imagine ever charging 0.50 USD per word, but then again if the opportunity ever arises, I'll do it.

Bernhard Sulzer wrote:
I don't want you to spill any secrets of success if you're afraid of that.


The secret to success in translation is being a good translator - it boils down to just that.icon_biggrin.gif The problem is that people define "success" differently. Some think it means having all the work, some think it is all the money, some think it is good work-life balance and having a family life.


 
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