Transcription/translation charges per "finished minute"
Thread poster: Deborah Workman

Deborah Workman  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 11:54
Spanish to English
+ ...
Nov 5, 2004

I've provided an agency with a translation/transcription quote per video minute and they have returned requesting that I quote "per finished minute". I'm not sure what this means. Can anyone clarify for me, please?

Deborah

PS To clarify, my question (initially, anyway) is not about how to charge for transcription but about the terminology used in negotiating rates. So, my question here is only about the term "finished minute" as specific to translation/transcription and as distinct from audio/video editing (where the term "finished minute" is contrasted with "raw minute", lots of "raw minutes" being processed and discarded in order to produce the final "finished minutes").

[Edited at 2004-11-05 17:14]


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Andy Lemminger  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 09:54
Member (2002)
English to German
Example Nov 5, 2004

If the video is 45 minutes and 59 seconds long you should quote a price for 45 minutes.
For subtitling large subtitling companies offer 3$ per minute, that means you would receive 135$ for this video.
For these rates it is more advisable to work as a cleaner, that's why I am not active in this segment anymore (but neither in the cleaning business, don't worry )


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Deborah Workman  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 11:54
Spanish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Do we mean the same thing by "finished"? Nov 5, 2004

Thanks, Andy. I want to be sure I understand your answer, and to do that I'll try to make sure that you understand my context:

-- The work for this prospective client is not for subtitling but for transcription/translation. (I don't think they're the same, are they?)

-- I have done work for another client that pays USD10 per video minute. The client never mentioned "finished minute" when it offered this rate. The client pays fractions of minutes at fractions of USD10.

-- I think you understand "finished" to mean "whole". Meawhile, I have assumed that "finished" has some meaning that is the opposite of "raw". I find lots of Google references to "finished minute" relating to audio and vidio editing (where the raw audio or video minutes are always very much more than the finished audio/video minutes). But I can't figure out what the term means with respect to translation/transcription.

Can you elaborate on your answer, please?

Thanks,

Deborah


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ntext  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 10:54
Member
German to English
+ ...
finished minute = video minute Nov 5, 2004

Deborah Workman wrote:
-- I have done work for another client that pays USD10 per video minute. The client never mentioned "finished minute" when it offered this rate. The client pays fractions of minutes at fractions of USD10.


I'm sure that what they call "finished minute" is the same as what you call "video minute." What else could it mean?


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Suzanne Blangsted  Identity Verified
Local time: 08:54
Danish to English
+ ...
transcription timing Nov 5, 2004

A suggestion: Take a minute from a spoken text (can be obtained by having a friend read some text for a minute onto a tape) then see how long it will take you to transcribe that. This should give you a rough idea of how much time you will spend doing all the client's text. Then multiply that with the length of the client's text, and add some time for proofing/editing your transcription. The final price is between you and your client. If you yourself read/speak/dictate the text on to the tape, then the timing will be inaccurate, as you already will be familiar with the text.

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