Rates for handling tags
Thread poster: Matthew Kinnersly

Matthew Kinnersly  Identity Verified
Local time: 10:50
Japanese to English
Nov 25, 2004

I've been asked to translate a large FrameMaker job in Trados, which will involve a lot of tags, so I'm wondering how to bill for the tags. Just formatting would normally be a job by the hour, but if I'm doing the tags as part of the main translation flow I wouldn't have separate billable hours spent tagging. Do people bill per tag, or raise the base translation rate to reflect added work, or what?

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Harry Bornemann  Identity Verified
Mexico
English to German
+ ...
I eat tags for breakfast ;-) Nov 25, 2004

Tags are one of the main causes for high fuzzy matches and the ones I had so far (also from Framemaker) did not cause significant additional work in TagEditor.

Otherwise I would add a percentage to my base rate, which would reflect exactly how much the tags would slow me down.

BTW, I just had some documents were Trados in Word skipped some tags and produced tag errors which were impossible to find (because they were not even opened in a segment) and inhibited the back-conversion of the files. In TagEditor there was no problem and the tag errors were easily found.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Ben Hickman  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 02:50
Dutch to English
handling tags Nov 25, 2004

Hello Matthew,

Translating an S-Tagged FrameMaker document shouldn't cause you any extra work, but I recommend that you stick to your guns on charging a standard rate (don't do the job at a discount). I also strongly suggest that, if you own Trados, you use the TagEditor. The TagEditor verifies the tags in the target segment each time a segment is closed.

It is also worth skimming through the PDF "S-Tagger Users Guide" found in the Documentation folder under Trados in the Start menu. If you are not using Trados, ask the agency you are working with to send you the PDF. The reason this is so important is that there are tags that you CAN add or delete. For example the tag (hard hyphen) may be used in an English document to prevent a word from being split at the end of a line in a text such as "two hundred thirty-four" (shown as "two hundred thirtyfour"). In Dutch, the hyphen is not used ("twee honderd vierendertig") and the tag can be eliminated. Simply placing the tag at the end of the segment, as done by many translators who do not bother to learn what the tags mean, does not cause a tagging error, but does produce undesirable layout (a hyphen at the end of a sentence where it doesn't belong).

The list of optional tags (some of which you can ADD!) is short, but worth printing and using as a reference during translation. If it's a hastle for you to get the list, send me an email and I'll send it to you.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Matthew Kinnersly  Identity Verified
Local time: 10:50
Japanese to English
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks for the advice Dec 4, 2004

Thank you both. I'm working on it now in TagEditor and the tagging doesn't take me any time. It's certainly easier than handling tags in Word. The downside is the absence of Word functions I'm used to (review history, autocorrect, glossary entry on the fly, etc.). TagEditor is aptly named, but I wish it was more like a word processor ...

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Harry Bornemann  Identity Verified
Mexico
English to German
+ ...
Glossary entry on the fly Dec 4, 2004

Matthew Kinnersly wrote:
The downside is the absence of Word functions I'm used to (review history, autocorrect, glossary entry on the fly, etc.). TagEditor is aptly named, but I wish it was more like a word processor ...

You can still add glossary entries on the fly by keeping an empty Word document open and copying the terms there, to feed them to the MultiTerm toolbar.

And in TagEditor's menu Tools/Plug-ins you can activate the Word spell checker, theoretically. (Practically, when I apply it, it always shuts down my TagEditor. )


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Matthew Kinnersly  Identity Verified
Local time: 10:50
Japanese to English
TOPIC STARTER
Good tip Dec 4, 2004

Harry_B wrote:

You can still add glossary entries on the fly by keeping an empty Word document open and copying the terms there, to feed them to the MultiTerm toolbar.

And in TagEditor's menu Tools/Plug-ins you can activate the Word spell checker, theoretically. (Practically, when I apply it, it always shuts down my TagEditor. )


That would certainly speed things up with glossaries. Thanks for saving me some time.
The Word spell checker seems to work on my machine, at least so far.


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Rates for handling tags

Advanced search







Wordfast Pro
Translation Memory Software for Any Platform

Exclusive discount for ProZ.com users! Save over 13% when purchasing Wordfast Pro through ProZ.com. Wordfast is the world's #1 provider of platform-independent Translation Memory software. Consistently ranked the most user-friendly and highest value

More info »
WordFinder
The words you want Anywhere, Anytime

WordFinder is the market's fastest and easiest way of finding the right word, term, translation or synonym in one or more dictionaries. In our assortment you can choose among more than 120 dictionaries in 15 languages from leading publishers.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search