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Consequences of "no deal" Brexit for freelance translators in the UK?
Thread poster: Samuel Espinho-Alves

Chris S  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Swedish to English
+ ...
Norway Dec 13, 2018

Sheila Wilson wrote:
the Norwegians have officially flatly rejected that idea.

That's not actually true. Fake news from The Guardian (!).
(And I don't think they would dare tbh.)

Tom from London wrote:
The UK has oil too but they have squandered the proceeds from it. Norway, very intelligently, created an "oil profits fund" (or something).

To be fair, they have more oil and hardly any people, so they don't have anything better to do with the money.


Dan Lucas
 

Axelle Hawkins  Identity Verified
Member (2017)
English to French
an other point .. Dec 13, 2018

Dan Lucas wrote:

Giovanni Guarnieri MITI, MIL wrote:
I'm not going to get a British passport... because... I'm not British and I don't feel British. ...

Very sensible - my wife feels the same way. Indefinite leave to remain, then?

Dan


I am French, married with an English man and living in the UK. Since years I said I must do my British passport (call me lazy ..). Last time I have a look (3 years ago), it would cost me around £ 300. Fair enough, paperwork etc .. I had a look last month: £1400 !! Well, I love Uk but it cost me too much to prove it!


Giovanni Guarnieri MITI, MIL
Isabelle Defévère
 

Giovanni Guarnieri MITI, MIL  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:51
Member (2004)
English to Italian
Same here... Dec 13, 2018

Axelle H. wrote:

I had a look last month: £1400 !! Well, I love Uk but it cost me too much to prove it!


A bit steep... I will become a naturalised Brit, if I have to, and I'll cough up for the blue passport... or maybe I will just go back to Italy, although with the political situation there too, it looks like I'm a bit stuck...


 

Elisabeth Purkis  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 14:51
German to English
+ ...


Posted via
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Don't marry an American either... Dec 14, 2018

Tom in London wrote:

Sheila Wilson wrote:
This whole sad affair


Indeed. Thanks to the EU membership of the UK I have been able to spend my whole working life moving between the UK and other Member States, working in Italy and going to university there, coming and going as I pleased, holding an Italian driving licence, and everything else a person can do....falling in love/falling out of love, et tout le reste...

From now on I would advise any young British person: be careful not to fall in love with anyone from an EU member state. Don't marry them, don't have children with them. Don't think of studying in any university outside the UK. And if you really must go somewhere else in Europe, make sure you have private medical insurance. And don't think of working there, or anything like that.

[Edited at 2018-12-12 15:12 GMT]


Perhaps slightly off topic...but in a similar vein...don't make the mistake of marrying an American living in the US and then think you'll all return to the UK to raise your kids/take care of your aging parents. Since 2012 (when the current occupant was Home Secretary) it's become a nightmare to even try. Most UK citizens have no clue as to the consequences of going to the US and falling in love...it just sounds so reasonable that you'd be able to return when you wish with your family and live happily ever after...most people in the UK are dumbfounded when they realize what a British citizen has to go through to re-establish themselves with a non-EU partner or worse still children. If you're a young mother thinking your American spouse will be the breadwinner, while you stay home with the baby/ your frail parents think again.


Sheila Wilson
Christine Andersen
 

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:51
Member (2008)
Italian to English
Hostile environment Dec 14, 2018

All part of Theresa May's "hostile environment" that she deliberately created when she was Home Secretary (Minister of the Interior). She (and not Brexit) is the problem.

Sheila Wilson
Giovanni Guarnieri MITI, MIL
 

Dan Lucas  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:51
Member (2014)
Japanese to English
I went through the same thing Dec 14, 2018

Elisabeth Purkis wrote:
If you're a young mother thinking your American spouse will be the breadwinner, while you stay home with the baby/ your frail parents think again.

The way it has been implemented is far from ideal. It's much more expensive than it needs to be, the forms are confusing, and arguably the required income level is too high.

However, I believe the basic idea is sound: if one comes back to live in this country with non-British dependents, one should be able to support those dependents without recourse to state benefits. That is, other UK taxpayers should not, as a rule, be forced to pay for those who cannot support dependents who are not British. So, yes, if the applicant is below the level of income they deem necessary, they will struggle to get a visa or leave to remain. And there are other, challenging conditions related to employment. It's not easy.

Tom in London wrote:
All part of Theresa May's "hostile environment" that she deliberately created when she was Home Secretary (Minister of the Interior). She (and not Brexit) is the problem.

I was not impressed by May before she started on Brexit, and I have been even less impressed by her actions over the past 18 months. Still, in the interests of fairness and full disclosure, what May actually said was: "The aim is to create, here in Britain, a really hostile environment for illegal immigrants". (My emphasis)

In other words, the intent was to create a hostile environment for those who break the laws of the United Kingdom. I have no problem with that, any more than I would have a problem with creating a really hostile environment for those who commit white-collar fraud, those who carry and use knives for hostile purposes, or those who commit arson. If you're breaking the law, you should expect to be made to feel uncomfortable.

I jumped through the legal hoops to get my visa/s when I lived abroad, and my wife has done the same to enable her to live lawfully here in the UK. I have no time for those who cheat. And such people do exist - have a look at the eye-openingly off-hand confessions on some of the UK immigration boards. "Yeah, I overstayed for eight years, but now I need a visa. What should I do?" Er, how about not break the laws of this country?

Nevertheless, as noted earlier, I have seen up-close how the process works, and the system seems to be to be complicated, expensive and disproportionately severe on those who make genuine mistakes. I would like to see thoughtful reforms implemented. For a start, there's a good argument for the government to take the whole process in-house again.

Regards,
Dan


Thomas T. Frost
Christine Andersen
 

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:51
Member (2008)
Italian to English
ALas Dec 15, 2018

Dan Lucas wrote:

The aim is to create, here in Britain, a really hostile environment for illegal immigrants[/url]". (My emphasis)


Alas, her definition of "illegal" extends to children and people with dark skin generally, including thousands who have every right to be here (the Windrush generation) on one overriding condition: they must be poor. Anyone who is rich can immigrate to the UK any time they like.

What I particularly dislike is how these policies make it impossible for someone to arrive poor, and become well off (like the large numbers of poor but entrepreneurial Poles who came here, worked hard and paid their taxes, set up their own businesses and networks, made a lot of money, and settled down; or a generation before them, Indians and Pakistanis who came here in the 1960s, worked day and night to send their children to the best universities and who are now top lawyers, journalists, etc.) That will now not be possibile.

What the indigenous Brits cannot stand is poor immigrants who come here, work harder than the Brits and are much better at what they do, achieve success, and become dominant in business, the professions, and the service industries.

[Edited at 2018-12-15 10:26 GMT]


Jan Truper
IanDhu
Christine Andersen
 

Jan Truper  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 21:51
English to German
+ ...
... Dec 15, 2018

Tom in London wrote:

From now on I would advise any young British person: be careful not to fall in love with anyone from an EU member state. Don't marry them, don't have children with them. Don't think of studying in any university outside the UK. And if you really must go somewhere else in Europe, make sure you have private medical insurance. And don't think of working there, or anything like that.


Tom in London wrote:

What the indigenous Brits cannot stand is poor immigrants who come here, work harder than the Brits and are much better at what they do, achieve success, and become dominant in business, the professions, and the service industries.


Some such people hate foreigners more than they love their own children.


IanDhu
 

Daryo
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:51
Serbian to English
+ ...
about brave assumptions Jun 10, 2019

Chris S wrote:

I have customers both in the EU and elsewhere and the only difference is a little extra paperwork for EU countries (EC sales list), which I might be able to skip in the future.

There are no customs charges/duties/taxes/quotas etc to worry about. You just charge your price and count your money, wherever your client is.

There is no VAT on translations for clients outside the EU even now.

I cannot comment on your specific position as an EU citizen resident in the UK, but I would imagine that very little will change. Money talks louder than politics.

PS Third country, not Third World country, I would hope





[Edited at 2018-12-12 11:42 GMT]



Money talks louder than politics .... from what I have been seeing the last 30 - 40 odd years, that looks like a very brave assumption - as brave as assuming "turkeys would never vote for Christmas"


 

Daryo
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:51
Serbian to English
+ ...
Nothing is impossible Jun 10, 2019

Tom in London wrote:

B D Finch wrote:
I wish I agreed!
I'm trying to be an ostrich, but think the sand is running out.


I just don't think it's possible to unravel 43 years of legislation and jurisprudence. A close look at T. May's proposed agreement reveals thousands and thousands of unresolved, and unresolvable matters.

[Edited at 2018-12-13 09:53 GMT]


if you couldn't care less about what it's going to cost you - or someone else. And if you think that the Looney Left has the monopoly on ideology wrecking the economy and people lives, you are an unreconstructed optimist. I would love to be proved wrong in the case of Brexit, but it doesn't look that way, so far.

[Edited at 2019-06-10 15:02 GMT]


IanDhu
Christine Andersen
 
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