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What to do about a faulty translation with numerous grammar and spelling mistakes?
Thread poster: Marina & Jan Riedberg
Marina & Jan Riedberg  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:23
French to German
+ ...
Sep 4, 2005

I outsourced a job requesting a French native speaker and got an offer from a French Canadian. I just got the job back and on the first two pages I found about 30 grammar mistakes or spelling mistakes.
I would like to know what the correct procedure is to handle the situation.

How much time must I give to correct the job, although I doubt that this person would be able to correct the job.
How much should I pay if I have to do the corrections?`

Best regards
Marina Riedberg


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Heinrich Pesch  Identity Verified
Finland
Local time: 00:23
Member (2003)
Finnish to German
+ ...
Was this the first job for this translator? Sep 4, 2005

Usually one first gives a small job to a new person, to see, if she can handle it properly.
If you notice the mistakes, you would be able to do the corrections yourself?
Just a suggestion!
Regards
Heinrich


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cendrine marrouat
English to French
+ ...
I agree Sep 4, 2005

Hi,
You should never give a job to someone you have not given a test before. It avoids problems and you don't run the risk of such a situation.

Personally, I would see if the translator can correct the mistakes. If it takes you for ever to proofread his or her work, then, you should deduct part of the money you owe him. They cannot argue if the work is really bad.


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baroni  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:23
Member (2004)
English to Italian
+ ...
Contact the translator Sep 4, 2005

I had the same problem a couple of years ago. In the translation (software) there were 2 *embarassing* mistakes.

I contacted the translator, he apologized (nobody is perfect, we are all human beings).

I paid him 100% because the mistakes were only 2...of course 30 mistakes in a page are a shame.

Contact him/her and see what he/she says...

Good luck
Francesca


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Lindsay Sabadosa  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 17:23
Member (2004)
Italian to English
+ ...
Cultural differences often equal grammatical differences Sep 4, 2005

I am not a French native speaker but I was taught by both a French prof from Normandy and one from Quebec in high school. I remember very distinctly the day my prof from Quebec has to reteach us a grammer lesson from the day before after the prof from Normandy informed him that in French French, the standard grammar used was different from what he had previously taught us. My point is this: definitely contact the translator because the issues in question may be cultural, rather than just plain incorrect. (I dealt with this same issue recently for educational documents regarding differences between US and British English.) Of course, I have no idea what kind of text it was but I've always understood that for marketing, or more colloquial texts, the differences between different forms of French can be drastic. Good luck to you in any case!
Best,
LNS


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NancyLynn
Canada
Local time: 17:23
Member (2002)
French to English
+ ...

MODERATOR
Agree with LNS Sep 4, 2005

The differences between European and Canadian French are what sprang to my mind on reading the initial post to this thread.

Of course I'd have to see the document to make a judgment; 30 mistakes seems extremely high.



Nancy


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Jane Lamb-Ruiz  Identity Verified
French to English
+ ...
It depends Sep 4, 2005

show then the mistakes and take some off..let the person correct it first..

cheers


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Sara Freitas
France
Local time: 23:23
French to English
Which target language did you need? Sep 5, 2005

European French or Canadian French?

Regards,

Sara


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CLS Lexi-tech
Local time: 17:23
Member (2004)
English to Italian
+ ...
Grammar mistakes are not cultural Sep 5, 2005

LSabadosa wrote:

I am not a French native speaker but I was taught by both a French prof from Normandy and one from Quebec in high school. I remember very distinctly the day my prof from Quebec has to reteach us a grammer lesson from the day before after the prof from Normandy informed him that in French French, the standard grammar used was different from what he had previously taught us. My point is this: definitely contact the translator because the issues in question may be cultural, rather than just plain incorrect. (I dealt with this same issue recently for educational documents regarding differences between US and British English.) Of course, I have no idea what kind of text it was but I've always understood that for marketing, or more colloquial texts, the differences between different forms of French can be drastic. Good luck to you in any case!
Best,
LNS


I agree that French Canadian is different from International or Paris French, but there is no excuse for grammatical mistakes of this kind. The rules of French still apply in Quebec or French Canada.
If this is the first time you can be lenient with the translator, but I would deduct from the invoice the time it has taken you to bring the text to an acceptable level. And I would not use the services of this translator again.
paola


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NancyLynn
Canada
Local time: 17:23
Member (2002)
French to English
+ ...

MODERATOR
well, it depends Sep 5, 2005

There are differences, for example, in gender agreement: un job in France becomes une job in Quebec; same for sandwich and, inversely, video; these 3 are off the top of my head.

There are other, subtler, differences, as evidenced in a KudoZ question I asked recently, where it was determined that European francophones seek things, whereas their North American counterparts find them.

It all depends on the nature of these mistakes, and naturally their repetition within the text.

Nancy


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cendrine marrouat
English to French
+ ...
Cultural differences do not always include grammar Sep 5, 2005

NancyLynn wrote:

There are differences, for example, in gender agreement: un job in France becomes une job in Quebec; same for sandwich and, inversely, video; these 3 are off the top of my head.

There are other, subtler, differences, as evidenced in a KudoZ question I asked recently, where it was determined that European francophones seek things, whereas their North American counterparts find them.

It all depends on the nature of these mistakes, and naturally their repetition within the text.

Nancy


Hi!
I am a French teacher in Canada and the only thing I can say is that the difference between both French is only an excuse. It's easy to go to the Grand Dictionnaire Terminologique or the Termium and check the words. In terms of grammar, the rules are the same, except a very few differences.
So the thing is that if you are a translator, you must act as such. There is no excuse for a lousy job.

Nancylynn, when you quote "Job", it's familiar Quebec French. Be careful not to mix slang and formal French.


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Timothy Barton
Local time: 23:23
French to English
+ ...
Did you do anything to make sure you wer getting a decent translator? Sep 5, 2005

Is the person a qualified translator? Did you ask him or her for any references? If the text was as bad as you seem to be saying, I suspect the person either wasn't native French, or wasn't a qualified translator. I believe outsourcers need to do more to make sure they're using good freelancers, rather than accepting the lowest offer (I'm not saying this was the case here, but it often is the case).

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Marina & Jan Riedberg  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:23
French to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
I passed a test Sep 5, 2005

Timothy Barton wrote:

Is the person a qualified translator? Did you ask him or her for any references? If the text was as bad as you seem to be saying, I suspect the person either wasn't native French, or wasn't a qualified translator. I believe outsourcers need to do more to make sure they're using good freelancers, rather than accepting the lowest offer (I'm not saying this was the case here, but it often is the case).


I asked for a small passage to be translated, asked for IT experience (which he clearly has) and asked for a native speaker. He told me he was French canadian, which I did not mind as I believe the French grammar and spelling is still the same and the passage he did was fine with no mistakes. I have outsourced for a couple of times, and fortunately I can correct the work myself.
In the meantime I asked him to correct the job and I received a corrected version, still with mistakes. Now he wants another go at the text.
I really would appreciate a blue board for freelancers.
Marina


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Marina & Jan Riedberg  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:23
French to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
type of mistakes Sep 5, 2005

NancyLynn wrote:

There are differences, for example, in gender agreement: un job in France becomes une job in Quebec; same for sandwich and, inversely, video; these 3 are off the top of my head.

There are other, subtler, differences, as evidenced in a KudoZ question I asked recently, where it was determined that European francophones seek things, whereas their North American counterparts find them.

It all depends on the nature of these mistakes, and naturally their repetition within the text.

Nancy


I only counted the pure grammar mistakes: no plurals "s", ce-se, "faute d'accorder les verbes", "sans sauté", etc. etc.I am not a specialist of Canadian french, but I do think that the grammar is still the same.

I already gave him a chance to correct the text and the corrected version is a little better, but there are still Grammar mistakes.


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