Im a newbie..got registered but have no clue how to start
Thread poster: meeta_fp
meeta_fp
Local time: 00:40
French to English
+ ...
Oct 13, 2005

hey, im a newbie from india. im into translating german to english and french to english.
im want to do these translation jobs for some extra income. can sum1 please help me with the entire procedure and rates. i dont know anything how these sites work. please help how to go about it. thank you.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Haiyang Ai  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 14:10
English to Chinese
+ ...
Forum Oct 13, 2005

Just spend time to read the posts in the forum. There's a lot to learn.

Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxMarc P  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:10
German to English
+ ...
Im a newbie..got registered but have no clue how to start Oct 13, 2005

Haiyang wrote:

Just spend time to read the posts in the forum. There's a lot to learn.


In my not particularly humble opinion: translation is a skilled profession, and not a little earner on the side for people who are "into it". It is also, despite the wealth of information available on this site, not something that can be learnt by browsing the ProZ fora.

My advice would be: leave it to the professionals, or become one yourself.

Marc


Direct link Reply with quote
 

amiclea
Local time: 22:10
English to Romanian
+ ...
come on, now! Oct 13, 2005

MarcPrior wrote:

Haiyang wrote:

Just spend time to read the posts in the forum. There's a lot to learn.


In my not particularly humble opinion: translation is a skilled profession, and not a little earner on the side for people who are "into it". It is also, despite the wealth of information available on this site, not something that can be learnt by browsing the ProZ fora.

My advice would be: leave it to the professionals, or become one yourself.

Marc


Marc, you may be a professional translator since 1988, but I seriously doubt it that you were born that. Or were you?
And my best guess is that you did a little learning before you got "pro". So why not let others learn as well? Afraid they'd get in with rates lower than yours? If you're the pro you claim to be, the quality of your work will keep you on top, right?
What you responded to Haiyang's request for guidance sounds like: get out of here and let the adults handle this! Or grow up real fast and then you can play with our toys.
That's completely non-constructive. (in my VERY humble opinion)
When I signed up for an account on proz.com, I don't remember having been asked about my professional level. If you're no good, than you won't get any work, or am I mistaking? So please have the courtesy to excuse us, regular folk, who were not born omniscient. I say you should live and let live or live and let die, whichever you choose, but LET!


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Stephen Rifkind  Identity Verified
Israel
Local time: 22:10
Member (2004)
French to English
+ ...
Start slowly and learn from your mistakes Oct 13, 2005

My advice is to to begin with small jobs, certificates and one page letters, which will let you gain the skill, confidence, and computer knowledge you need for bigger jobs. The money is not big, especially in India. Your German pair, in my opinion, is your better match, given the ratio of work to translators in that pair, but you may also get French jobs. Decide how much money you can invest in the beginning and pick a few sites or translation associations. Not everybody wants the "Pro from Delhi"; some just want a simple translation. After you have gained confidence and shown that you are a good translator, the bigger projects come, when you are ready for them.

Also, always ask if you have done the best job possible and what you can do better next time. There are always those who will put you down. Be critical, but believe in yourself.

Good luck from a 1 year part time translator.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Victor Dewsbery  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 21:10
German to English
+ ...
Target language = native language ??? Oct 13, 2005

amiclea wrote:

MarcPrior wrote:
In my not particularly humble opinion: translation is a skilled profession, and not a little earner on the side for people who are "into it". It is also, despite the wealth of information available on this site, not something that can be learnt by browsing the ProZ fora.
My advice would be: leave it to the professionals, or become one yourself.
Marc


Marc, you may be a professional translator since 1988, but I seriously doubt it that you were born that. Or were you?
... I say you should live and let live or live and let die, whichever you choose, but LET!


Hi Amiclea,
I sympathise with Marc's point. A query in imperfect English from someone who wants to translate into English is not encouraging. Perhaps meeta_fp had a bad day or was a bit nervous and thus made those mistakes. But if he/she is a native speaker of a different language and not an expert (at native speaker level) in English, Mark's comment "leave it to the professionals, or become one yourself" is justified.

Please note, I do not criticise anyone's English in postings on ProZ. In fact, I have an enormous respect for people who take the time and make the effort to write such interesting posts in a foreign language - I would definitely be far less proficient in my own passive (non-working) language of French. But when people say they translate into English, I am disappointed if their written English contains basic errors.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Sonja Allen  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:10
Member (2005)
English to German
+ ...
Complete your profile on Proz.com Oct 13, 2005

It is difficult to give advice as you haven't put anything in your profile so we do not know your background. Where did you learn German and French? Have you spent time in Germany and France? Have you had any translation experience so far? Complete your profile and, as mentioned before, look into past forum questions which can give you a lot of tips and hints. Good luck!

Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxMarc P  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:10
German to English
+ ...
Im a newbie..got registered but have no clue how to start Oct 13, 2005

Amiclea,

With all due respect, I am entitled to my opinion, humble or not, and my opinion is that when offered as a business service, translation must be performed to a professional standard. This isn't simply my opinion: it also happens to be consistent with commercial legislation my country, and possibly even in yours. Furthermore, it is also in line with ProZ.com policy (I'll come back to that later).

I have no objection to meeta_fp becoming a professional translator (contrary to your post, Hiayang was not the one requesting guidance), and I think I made that clear enough in my original post. There are many ways of becoming a professional translator, but browsing the Proz.com fora is not, in my opinion, one of them.

Of course I wasn't born a professional translator. I spent many years training and many more years learning from experienced colleagues before assuming responsibility for my own work. As far as being omniscient is concerned, none of us knows everything. Others will, I'm sure, be able to confirm that I have helped (or tried to help) many others on this site with specific issues, just as others have helped me. I also spend a lot of time mentoring new freelancers in a scheme run by my professional association. But there are limits. Specific issues is one thing; ten easy tips to a lucrative sideline in translation is another. That, since you used the word, is precisely what I regard as not being "constructive".

I don't "claim" to be a professional; I take it as read that the label applies to everyone who is providing translation services commercially. Anything else is unethical - again, in my opinion.

No, I'm not worried about people working with rates lower than mine. I am, though, concerned about being associated with a site that is itself associated with amateurism, incompetence and making a fast buck. That is precisely the image enjoyed by ProZ.com in some quarters. Many translators refuse to be associated with it for that reason, and you may also have noticed that many of the particularly experienced translators - far more experienced than I am - prefer not to use their full names here.

Rather than abandon the site, I would prefer to see its professional status enhanced. But that means that it must be defended. This brings me back to my earlier point. You say that you weren't asked about your professional level when you joined ProZ.com. Perhaps you overlooked the ProZ.com guidelines, which can be found here: www.proz.com/?sp=info/&ssp=intro&sssp=guidelines. It should be clear from these that under ProZ.com policy, the observance of professional standards is not optional.

I repeat: leave translation to the professionals, or become one yourself. Without more information from meeta_fp on his or her existing qualifications (in the broadest sense of the word), it's difficult to provide more specific advice.

Marc


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Trudy Peters  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 15:10
German to English
+ ...
Well said, Marc! Oct 13, 2005

I have nothing to add.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Stephen Rifkind  Identity Verified
Israel
Local time: 22:10
Member (2004)
French to English
+ ...
Definition of "professional translator" Oct 13, 2005

To some of my more experienced colleagues:

I would like a definition of the term "professional translator." I am by force of necessity a part time translator, dedicating half of my week to translating. Does this make me a semi-professional translator. Some of my translations have been called excellent, while some of have been called terrible, not that I necessarily agreed with either rating. Am I still an "amateur" after one year, or do I have to go through the bibilical seven years to receive the bride of professionalism. I have a degree in Russian, but no degree in translation; my best language is French, because of my mother, while my most common langauge of translation is Hebrew, because of the market. Therefore, am I a "jack of all trades and master of none?" If professionalism is an attitude of elitism, then it does nobody any good. If professionalism is an approach consisting of careful, consciencious, and caring work, mixed with the ability to learn from mistakes, our "newbie" up there may be better than some of his/her more experienced counterparts, or maybe not. The only definition I can find is that used in sports: I am a professional because I am paid for my work and my clients consider my work professional enough.

P.S. About typos in emails, until you have seen someone's work, do not judge it.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Victor Dewsbery  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 21:10
German to English
+ ...
How good are you? Oct 13, 2005

Stephen Rifkind wrote:
To some of my more experienced colleagues:
I would like a definition of the term "professional translator." I am by force of necessity a part time translator, dedicating half of my week to translating. Does this make me a semi-professional translator. ...
P.S. About typos in emails, until you have seen someone's work, do not judge it.


Hi Stephen,
How good are you? That is what decides whether the quality of the work you do is professional. (And I have not seen any reason to doubt the quality of your work.)

Of course the work we do is the measure of our professionalism, and the occasional typo in a posting here is not so important.
But if somebody seems to have a basic difficulty phrasing his/her thoughts in English (and seems not to be a native speaker of English), and then claims to translate into English, it is worth expressing doubts.
As I wrote, there may be other factors which caused those mistakes, but a warning now (unpleasant though it may be) could help the person to re-examine his/her career choices (and perhaps save a lot of heartache and trouble later on).


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Harry Bornemann  Identity Verified
Mexico
English to German
+ ...
Jumping into cold water means asking for trouble.. Oct 13, 2005

I think you should try to convince some agencies (working in
your language directions and fields of interest) to send you
their translation tests, if they have any.

If you work them out honestly and pass at least some of them,
you might have found your first customers.

In case you won't pass any of them, you will realise that you
are not ready, yet.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

LegalTransform  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 15:10
Member (2002)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Is this a Joke? Oct 13, 2005

This is obviously a prank and not a very funny one at that.

meeta_fp wrote:

hey, im a newbie from india. im into translating german to english and french to english.
im want to do these translation jobs for some extra income. can sum1 please help me with the entire procedure and rates. i dont know anything how these sites work. please help how to go about it. thank you.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Tsu Dho Nimh
Local time: 13:10
English
Learn English as a first step Oct 13, 2005

meeta_fp wrote:
hey, im a newbie from india. im into translating german to english and french to english.
im want to do these translation jobs for some extra income. can sum1 please help me with the entire procedure and rates. i dont know anything how these sites work. please help how to go about it. thank you.


Judging by your post, the first step would be to learn how to write correct English.

The second step would be to fill out your "Profile" page with information on your background and specialties so that potential clients can make an educated decision about your skills.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

sylvie malich
Germany
Local time: 21:10
German to English
That's what I thought Oct 14, 2005

Jeff Whittaker wrote:

This is obviously a prank and not a very funny one at that.



It's was just too obvious.


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Im a newbie..got registered but have no clue how to start

Advanced search







Wordfast Pro
Translation Memory Software for Any Platform

Exclusive discount for ProZ.com users! Save over 13% when purchasing Wordfast Pro through ProZ.com. Wordfast is the world's #1 provider of platform-independent Translation Memory software. Consistently ranked the most user-friendly and highest value

More info »
memoQ translator pro
Kilgray's memoQ is the world's fastest developing integrated localization & translation environment rendering you more productive and efficient.

With our advanced file filters, unlimited language and advanced file support, memoQ translator pro has been designed for translators and reviewers who work on their own, with other translators or in team-based translation projects.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search