Off topic: How much would you ask?
Thread poster: Chantal Kamgne

Chantal Kamgne  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 05:59
Member (2006)
English to French
Sep 11, 2006

I do not know anything about the cost of living in Canada, but things are rather nice and cheap here, and supposing that a friend of mine is being prospected for an inhouse position as a translator there, what terms should that friend try to obtain to see if it is worth loosing her freelance status.

If it is not legal to make a public reply, may be someone wishing to help may send a mail.


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Sonia Dorais
Canada
Local time: 05:59
French to English
+ ...
No need to stop freelancing Sep 11, 2006

Hi!

I am from Canada and I work full-time as a translator in a law firm and still part-time freelance. So, I think arrangements can be made in that aspect.

As for the salary etc. it will depend on the languages translated and the specialisation. The translators I know who specialise in finance and law make a lot more money but work long hours.

If there is a need for an in-house translator for a less frequent language (such as Chinese, Japanese, Arabic etc.) they will usually get paid more than thos who translate French and English (which is more common here).

I hope this helps.


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ViktoriaG  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 05:59
English to French
+ ...
I wouldn't leave the house for under $40000 per year Sep 12, 2006

But then again, my business is doing great and some people may disagree. Actually, I'd rather not leave my house for under $60000. I would also expect full retirement and insurance package from the employer. With the success I have, I can afford those things on my own, so the employer would have to beat that to get me to wait for the bus at -30 Centigrade every morning - and get out of work only when it's already dark.

Then again, I don't know if we all have as much success. I've seen inhouse proofing-translation jobs in the past two years around $37000 per year - still too low for me. I think the wages are better in Toronto - I'm in Montreal. But either way, Chantal, when you make $37000 per year and don't yet have kids to take care of, after you're done paying taxes, you still have enough to be in a nice environment and have a beer when you feel like it

The real question is - how much are you worth? And the question after that: would anybody be willing to pay you that much? If the answer is no, you're better off staying a freelancer.

And one last thought: lately, I have noticed that, in countries where the cost of living is low, there is more room for reasonable (read: respectable) rates. For example, in certain countries, I would be considered downright rich with the money I make - and it is possible to keep making that money regardless of what your location is. So, why not appreciate a nice, sunny African country where things are cheaper and where you are closer to home? The grass is always greener on the other side - until you get there. Or, as goes a Hungarian saying: the fence is made of sausage!


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Chantal Kamgne  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 05:59
Member (2006)
English to French
TOPIC STARTER
relocating Sep 12, 2006

Thank you, Sonia. I...heu, my friend was indeed reluctant to completely loosing the freelance status, and wondering if there is some sort of restriction to prevent one from carrying out his freelance activity once recruited. And Victoria, you have the finger on the other point: I am not really willing to leave my...again my friend's sunny, nice, cheap, lovely, etc..country except to earn more money and for a more comfortable living. My friend should better ask them what they have to offer.

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ViktoriaG  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 05:59
English to French
+ ...
A definite advantage Sep 12, 2006

I forgot to mention that in Canada, tax law allows you to not pay any taxes on revenue from outside of the country as long as the yearly revenue from outside the country does not exceed CAD 100,000. So, if most of your clients are outside of Canada, and unless you are a miracle translator who makes over CAD 100,000 outside of the country, you get a major tax break. This is a definite advantage! Usually, you pay 20% tax on regular freelance work. Now, let's say that 90% of your work comes from other countries - it's my case - and you can easily pay 2 or 3% tax on your total yearly revenue instead of 20%. You can go on a nice vacation each year with that kind of money!

Also, if you take up a regular job in Canada, nothing will keep you from freelancing part time - and if the freelancing you do is for clients outside of Canada, you get to cash in the total amount of those invoices, no questions asked.

Otherwise, the grass can seem greener here, but trust me, it's just the shade of it that's different - but it's not any greener than any other country. It's just different. In fact, I've met people from Cameroon, and accoding to what they say about their country, I bet I'd be happy to live there.

All the best!

P.S.: Do ask any questions about living in Canada. I would be glad to inform you - and I can compare to other countries, too, having lived abroad.

Forgot to mention, this tax law thing only applies to freelancing. If you are an employee of a foreign business, that's another story.

[Edited at 2006-09-13 13:31]


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Chantal Kamgne  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 05:59
Member (2006)
English to French
TOPIC STARTER
collaboration Sep 13, 2006

So many things make it difficult to just accept such an offer. Now we are exploring the other possible ways of working together...does that not sound simpler? Thank you for your help:-)

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Rustam Nasyrov  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 05:59
English to Russian
+ ...
Your messsage is interesting Sep 17, 2006

Sonia-Catherine wrote:

Hi!

I am from Canada and I work full-time as a translator in a law firm and still part-time freelance. So, I think arrangements can be made in that aspect.

As for the salary etc. it will depend on the languages translated and the specialisation. The translators I know who specialise in finance and law make a lot more money but work long hours.

If there is a need for an in-house translator for a less frequent language (such as Chinese, Japanese, Arabic etc.) they will usually get paid more than thos who translate French and English (which is more common here).

I hope this helps.


Hi Sonia-Catherine!
I am a new user of this site and until today I've had no time neither to quote for jobs nor to write to anybody here. It's now 04.00 in Paris and I don't want to sleep anymore and decided to enter the site. I've read many messages in the forums, many of them are interesting, but what you told about the job of translator in Canada attracted me most of all, because I want to immigrate to Canada and I have already started to prepare necessary papers. Can you tell me how do you find this site and does it really help you to earn extra money?

Sincerely,

R.Nasyrov, Paris


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