Off topic: O bella ciao: Una mattina mi son svegliato (problem with "svegliato")
Thread poster: xxxLia Fail
xxxLia Fail  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 19:36
Spanish to English
+ ...
Apr 25, 2009

I heard this song recently and was captivated by it, as I have been by other songs associated with the second world war, like "Ay Carmela"..... I have the mp3 and the lyrics and want to sing it loud as I pedal up hill and down dale, far from civilisation, and far from musically or otherwise discerning ears:-)

http://www.marxists.org/subject/art/music/lyrics/it/bella-ciao.htm

I know no IT, so, although I know ES and CAT, I have difficulty with the following:

Una mattina mi son svegliato

and

O partigiano porta mi via

The second problem is easier: why does "via" sound like "vida"?

The first one is more complicated, because - in my ignorance - I can't relate "svegliato" w¡ith how it sounds to me, which is "be' sensato". So, phonentically, or in relation to EN or ES, how do I pronounce "svegliato"?

TIA:-)

Ailish


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Riccardo Schiaffino  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 11:36
Member (2003)
English to Italian
+ ...
pronunciation of "svegliato" Apr 25, 2009

Lia Fail wrote:

I heard this song recently and was captivated by it, as I have been by other songs associated with the second world war, like "Ay Carmela"..... I have the mp3 and the lyrics and want to sing it loud as I pedal up hill and down dale, far from civilisation, and far from musically or otherwise discerning ears:-)

http://www.marxists.org/subject/art/music/lyrics/it/bella-ciao.htm

I know no IT, so, although I know ES and CAT, I have difficulty with the following:

Una mattina mi son svegliato

and

O partigiano porta mi via

The second problem is easier: why does "via" sound like "vida"?

The first one is more complicated, because - in my ignorance - I can't relate "svegliato" w¡ith how it sounds to me, which is "be' sensato". So, phonentically, or in relation to EN or ES, how do I pronounce "svegliato"?

TIA:-)

Ailish


you pronounce it as if it were written

dzveh-LHA-toh

in English, with the stress of the second syllabe

BTW

it's "o partigiano, portami via", not "porta mi"






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Juan Jacob  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 12:36
French to Spanish
+ ...
See this. Apr 25, 2009

Love the song.
Yves Montand version.
He was Italian, by the way... his name was Ivi.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yAYZUhZ7plA


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Cristina intern  Identity Verified
Austria
Local time: 19:36
Member (2008)
German to Italian
+ ...
La Pronunciación Italiana Apr 25, 2009

Hola Lia,

esperando de ser de ayuda, voy a citar:
http://es.wikibooks.org/wiki/Italiano/Curso/Lección_01

La pronunciación italiana es similar a la castellana, si bien existen algunas diferencias, y el fonema no siempre corresponde a la letra española:

A: Se pronuncia igual que en castellano.
B: Se pronuncia igual que en castellano.
C: Delante de -a, -o y -u se pronuncia igual que en castellano.
Ante -e e -i se pronuncia como la CH- española.
CH: Para pronunciar el sonido de la CH- ante -a, -o y -u, se escribe una -i- entre la c- y la
vocal correspondiente (ejem: cioccolato).
Una CH- italiana equivale a una QU- española.
D: Se pronuncia igual que en castellano.
E: Existen la "e breve" y la "e larga" (pronunciada con la boca un poco más abierta).
F: Se pronuncia igual que en castellano.
G: Delante de -a, -o, -u se pronuncia igual que en castellano.
Ante -e e -i se pronuncia como la J- catalana en Jordi o un yeísmo.
GH- ante -e y -i suena igual que en castellano GUE y GUI.
GU- ante -a, -o y -u suena igual que en castellano, pero ante -e, -i se pronuncia como GÜE/GÜI.
Para hacer el sonido de GUE/GUI no se escribe GU-, sino GH- (ejem: ghetto).
GN- es el equivalente de la Ñ.
GL- normalmente se pronuncia como la LL- (no yeísta). Sin embargo, delante de algunas palabras
(negligente, globo) suena como en castellano.
H: Si va sola no se pronuncia.
I: Se pronuncia igual que en castellano.
L: Se pronuncia igual que en castellano. Una LL- italiana es el sonido de la L alargado.
M: Se pronuncia igual que en castellano.
N: Se pronuncia igual que en castellano.
O: Existen la "o breve" y la "o larga" (pronunciada con la boca un poco más abierta).
P: Se pronuncia igual que en castellano.
Q: Se pronuncia como Cua, Cue, Cui, Cuo.
R: Se pronuncia como R en "caro". Cuando es RR- se pronuncia como "rosa"
S: Se pronuncia igual que en castellano.
SC- después de -e e -i se pronuncia como SH en inglés. Para pronunciar el sonido de la SH- ante -a, -o y -u, se escribe una -i- entre la sc- y la vocal correspondiente (ejem. sciocco)
T: Se pronuncia igual que en castellano.
U: Se pronuncia igual que en castellano.
V: Se pronuncia como la V inglesa (pronúnciala como una B pero pasando los dientes por el labio inferior).
Z: se pronuncia como TS-
Las consonantes dobles (rr, ss, cc, tt) se pronuncian alargando la letra en cuestión.



[Edited at 2009-04-25 06:16 GMT]


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Ms.Straus  Identity Verified
Slovenia
Local time: 19:36
Member (2007)
English to Slovenian
+ ...
Bella Ciao by Modena City Ramblers Apr 25, 2009

Dear Lia,

I love this song!

I wanted to recommend this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-KjaNPY2OsI (a particularly haunting version in my opinion)

And this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rftv7KuJ0mY (a Balkan-flavoured interpretation; lively and very, very sad at the same time).

The lyrics to this song vary quite a lot – but the gist's the same.


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xxxLia Fail  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 19:36
Spanish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks everybody:-) Apr 25, 2009

I especially like the Goran Bregovic / Modena City Ramblers versions, although I understand Yves better, but I think he croons it, and I prefer the fast pace of the song as a marching song.

I should correct myself re Ay Carmela (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TaEgU7oBmTQ), it's a Spanish civil war song, but has acquired a reputation as a song of resistance.

If anyone knows of similar resistance or protest marching songs, I'd love to hear of them, and from anywhere in the world.

I'm trying to think of one from Ireland, but there are so many ...

I especially like the one below (Pogues: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PTHWJbw60Gk, and a more traditional version: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D0hThSb36as&feature=related).

It's not so much antiwar as anti-Irish-fighting a British war, but it's a great marching song:-)

[Recruiting Sergeant]
-----------------------------------
As I was walking down the road
A feeling fine and larky oh
A recruiting sergeant came up to me
Says he, you'd look fine in khaki oh
For the King he is in need of men
Come read this proclamation oh
A life in Flanders for you then
Would be a fine vacation oh

That may be so says I to him
But tell me sergeant dearie-oh
If I had a pack stuck upon my back
Would I look fine and cheerie oh
For they'd have you train and drill until
They had you one of the Frenchies oh
It may be warm in Flanders
But it's draughty in the trenches oh

The sergeant smiled and winked his eye
His smile was most provoking oh
He twiddled and twirled his wee mustache
Says he, I know you're only joking oh
For the sandbags are so warm and high
The wind you won't feel blowing oh
Well I winked at a cailin passing by
Says I, what if it's snowing oh

Come rain or hail or wind or snow
I'm not going out to Flanders oh
There's fighting in Dublin to be done
Let your sergeants and your commanders go
Let Englishmen fight English wars
It's nearly time they started oh
I saluted the sergeant a very good night
And there and then we parted oh



[Edited at 2009-04-25 19:32 GMT]


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Clarisa Moraña  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 15:36
Member (2002)
English to Spanish
+ ...
That's funny! Apr 25, 2009

I knew that song, and I used to sing it when I was a girl. I was absolutely sure that it was a kids song! While I did not understand the words, the rythm was so nice, that I kept singing it all the times. We, the girls, sung it at the school yard!
I was sure the (non sense) words were: "Obelachau-bela-chau-chau-chau", and I always wondered where I could listen to it again.


I song that I always loved is Bandiera Rossa. But I know that was a comunist song. And the songs of the Spanish Civil words were sung by my father at home. My grandfather, though, was horrorified, and could not stand that!


[Edited at 2009-04-26 03:14 GMT]


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O bella ciao: Una mattina mi son svegliato (problem with "svegliato")

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