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Off topic: Who has the most unusual language combination?
Thread poster: xxxJon O
xxxJon O  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:22
Dutch to English
+ ...
Feb 13, 2007

A bag of peanuts for the winner.

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Csaba Ban  Identity Verified
Hungary
Local time: 19:22
Member (2002)
English to Hungarian
+ ...
Kazakh-Zulu... in my dream Feb 13, 2007

I'm just munching away a bag of assorted nuts and raisins...

My language pairs are not unusual, but once, some years ago I had a strange dream. I was in this second hand bookshop in a no-name European city... and I found a very rare language pair for a pocket dictionary, namely Kazakh-Zulu.

In reality, I do go to second hand bookshops a lot, and I collect old/unusual dictionaries, but I've no idea where I got Kazakh and Zulu from in my dream...

Csaba


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Juan Jacob  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 12:22
French to Spanish
+ ...
Latin --> Esperanto... Feb 13, 2007

...I guess.
Not me, though.
(Gee, I love peanuts!)


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Orla Ryan  Identity Verified
Ireland
Local time: 18:22
My2 cents Feb 13, 2007

How about Irish Gaelic to Chinese

A couple of years ago, there was a film here called "Yu Ming is ainm dom" (My name is Yu Ming).

It is about this Chinese guy who decides to move to Ireland. He finds out Irish Gaelic is the first official language of the country so he goes off and learns the language before moving to Dublin only to find that no-one speaks Irish.


Actually, you can see it here, the film is only 13 mins long: http://www.atomfilms.com/film/name_yu_ming.jsp
(it has English subtitles)

So, if I win, can I get some dry-roasted peanuts? Pretty please?

Orla


[Edited at 2007-02-13 23:27]


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Will Matter  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 10:22
English
+ ...
I don't know Feb 14, 2007

Are you talking about theoretical combinations or real ProZians? When it comes to me there aren't too many Japanese / Russian / German / Spanish speakers that can read and write Chinese in my neighborhood. I'm sure that some other ProZians are just as unusual when compared to their friends and acquaintances.

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JaneTranslates  Identity Verified
Puerto Rico
Local time: 13:22
Member (2005)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Spanish/English/Klingon? Feb 14, 2007

Awww, I guess the peanuts are for real-life combinations, not fantasy ones, right? But I actually carried the Klingon dictionary and self-teaching grammar to the bookstore cash register before I got sensible and took them back.

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xxxJon O  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:22
Dutch to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
I like this one, this is currently the front-runner Feb 14, 2007

Orla Ryan wrote:

How about Irish Gaelic to Chinese

A couple of years ago, there was a film here called "Yu Ming is ainm dom" (My name is Yu Ming).

It is about this Chinese guy who decides to move to Ireland. He finds out Irish Gaelic is the first official language of the country so he goes off and learns the language before moving to Dublin only to find that no-one speaks Irish.


Actually, you can see it here, the film is only 13 mins long: http://www.atomfilms.com/film/name_yu_ming.jsp
(it has English subtitles)

So, if I win, can I get some dry-roasted peanuts? Pretty please?

Orla


[Edited at 2007-02-13 23:27]


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Christine Schmit  Identity Verified
Luxembourg
German to French
+ ...
Spanish to Luxembourgish anyone? Feb 14, 2007

Interesting topic!
If we are talking about real combinations, I have 5 rather unusual ones:
Luxembourgish to French
French to Luxembourgish
German to Luxembourgish
English to Luxembourgish
Spanish to Luxembourgish
I would say that among those 5, Spanish to Luxembourgish is the most unusual one (I'm the only one on Proz with that combination), I have never yet had any work in this pair and I am not sure I will ever get some, but you never know.

If we are talking about dream combinations, I would love to learn Nahuatl or Maya just for fun, I actually have a Maya-Spanish dictionary. Maya into Luxembourgish just sounds great, doesn't it?

Another question: when you do a directory search and look at all the languages on the list, am I the only one to think that there are a lot of languages I never knew they even existed? It would be really interesting to have statistics about the language pairs offered by Prozians!

Christine


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xxxJon O  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:22
Dutch to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Let's keep it to actual combinations, I think.. Feb 14, 2007

Luxembourgish-Spanish is not bad, but I don't think two European national languages can win the peanuts.

I want something ridiculous, like Faroese>Ndebele

Irish>Chinese still in the lead I think


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Evonymus (Ewa Kazmierczak)  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 19:22
English to Polish
+ ...
Amharic - Xhosa Feb 14, 2007

or Tigrinian to Xhosa
I travelled both in Ethiopia and South Arica, and all three languages are just impossible for Europeans, at least IMO.
In Xhosa the clicking sound - just unfeasible for me
cheers Ewa


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Chiara Righele  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 19:22
English to Italian
+ ...
I can't compete , but I didn't know... Feb 14, 2007

A couple of years ago, there was a film here called "Yu Ming is ainm dom" (My name is Yu Ming).

It is about this Chinese guy who decides to move to Ireland. He finds out Irish Gaelic is the first official language of the country so he goes off and learns the language before moving to Dublin only to find that no-one speaks Irish.

[...]

Wow! I thought it was an urban legend: a frien told me this story as a joke! I'll download the film and see it!!

Thanks Orla!

Nice thread, BTW. I just have unexciting combinations though (ENG < > ITA, GER < > ITA).

Once I read that there is no living person that could "translate" in some particular combinations (like Faroese>Ndebele, I suppose: I am always surprised when scrolling language combinations in ProZ list...)

Chiara

[Edited at 2007-02-14 13:22]


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Orla Ryan  Identity Verified
Ireland
Local time: 18:22
Those peanuts are MINE! ;-) Feb 14, 2007

Jon Orman wrote:

Irish>Chinese still in the lead I think


*lol* cool! Have you had a chance to look at the film yet?
The actor who plays Fr. Jack Hackett in "Fr. Ted" is in it.


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Kemal Mustajbegovic  Identity Verified
Local time: 01:22
English to Croatian
+ ...
Latin - Russian Feb 14, 2007

When I was at Uni we had a chance to study two languages in any combination; the most popular were English, German, Italian and French. But one friend of mine had chosen to study Russian and Latin.
Eventually she dropped out after first year, switched to law and nowadays she is a successful lawyer.


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Kirill Semenov  Identity Verified
Ukraine
Local time: 20:22
Member (2004)
English to Russian
+ ...
Latin<>Russian - not that rare Feb 14, 2007

Kemal Mustajbegovic wrote:
But one friend of mine had chosen to study Russian and Latin.


In fact, it's not that rare for Russian natives, but not very popularm that's true. As far as I know, for example, all Russian priests of Eastern Orthodox Church learn Ancient Greek and Latin, as well as Church Slavonic, so there are a lot of language specialists in this pair, although a few are here, at proZ.

By the way, the grammatical structure of Latin & Russian are closer than, say, for Latin & English.

[Edited at 2007-02-14 12:58]


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Lucinda  Identity Verified
Local time: 14:22
Member (2002)
Dutch to English
+ ...
Unusual language combinations Feb 14, 2007

Do they have to be combinations that you currently offer services in?

If not, here is one. When I first started translating I used to offer Sranang Tongo to English (UK and US).

That was prior to Proz and all the Internet portals.

Btw, Sranang Tongo is a dialect spoken and written in Suriname, South America.

This is a fun topic; thanks for starting it.

Lucinda


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