Off topic: Another blatant money laundering scheme from Nigeria
Thread poster: Lars Jelking

Lars Jelking  Identity Verified
Israel
Local time: 14:25
Member (2006)
English to Swedish
+ ...
May 16, 2007

I receiced an E-mail from an Australian lottery advicing me that I won US$200.000. The only thing I am to do in order to collect the money is sending an E-mail to the lottery organizers branch in Nigeria (with an Yahoo E-mail adress).

Anyone else won on that lottery?


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Nicole Johnson  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 13:25
Italian to English
+ ...
Not only in Australia, but Several UK Lotteries as well... May 16, 2007

If I had really won all of the "lotteries" for which I've received Spam notfications over the past few years, I would be kicking back on my own private tropical island right now!

Just trash them, and if you can avoid opening them at all, that is best!


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Jenny Forbes  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:25
Member (2006)
French to English
+ ...
Does anyone fall for these scams? Statistics? May 16, 2007

Lars Jelking wrote:

I receiced an E-mail from an Australian lottery advicing me that I won US$200.000. The only thing I am to do in order to collect the money is sending an E-mail to the lottery organizers branch in Nigeria (with an Yahoo E-mail adress).

Anyone else won on that lottery?


There are so many scams of this kind (in the old days they used to come by post).
I just wonder whether anyone actually falls for them. I suppose they must, or the senders wouldn't keep issuing them.
Does anyone know whether there are any statistics on the scammers' success rate?
Regards,
Jenny.


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Erik Hansson  Identity Verified
Germany
Member (2002)
Swedish
+ ...
Successful to a certain degree May 16, 2007

Jenny Forbes wrote:

I just wonder whether anyone actually falls for them. I suppose they must, or the senders wouldn't keep issuing them.
Does anyone know whether there are any statistics on the scammers' success rate?
Regards,
Jenny.


I don't know if there is any statistics, as most of the persons who fall for them certainly feel embarrassed and won't report this to the authorities. But apparently it's possible to "earn" money with this, or they would have given it up long ago.

About 10 yrs ago a neighbour (an old lady) came along and wanted me to translate the English letter she had received from these people (she would even pay me for doing the translation). She was excited as they had promised her so much money. I explained to her that she shouldn't invest any money in this and just throw it away as far away as possible.

[Bearbeitet am 2007-05-16 11:32]


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Hynek Palatin  Identity Verified
Czech Republic
Local time: 13:25
English to Czech
+ ...
Scam victim murdered Nigerian consul in Prague May 16, 2007

In February 2003, 72-year old Czech shot Nigerian consul in Prague. Allegedly, he lost about 2.000.000 USD (yes, two million US dollars) in a scam. 500k were his own savings and he borrowed the rest. He thought he was investing in a oil pipeline. When he found out it was a scam he asked the consul for help and he shot him on the third meeting (and wounded another person). The consul was allegedly known for being very honest.

Here's an older article in English:
http://www.praguepost.com/P03/2005/Art/0317/news2.php
You can google for more.


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José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 09:25
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Some enlightening info May 16, 2007

I found most of the details on how it works at:
http://www.fraudaid.com/

Though I delete pronto the messages of this kind that manage to bypass my highly effective antispam system, apparently there are people who still fall for it. Among the information at:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advance_fee_fraud
... which includes history, there is:
"The Nigerian scam is hugely successful. According to a 1997 newspaper article: 'We have confirmed losses just in the United States of over $100 million in the last 15 months,' said Special Agent James Caldwell, of the Secret Service financial crimes division. 'And that's just the ones we know of. We figure a lot of people don't report them.'"
... though it might be just as fake as the whole thing.

What's left for us is to laugh at the scammers' attempts to write in decent English.


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Deschant
Local time: 12:25
Reply May 16, 2007

Apparently they are misusing the name of a number of existing and perfectly legitimate lotteries, for example Spain's Lotería Primitiva - they however provide Spanish telephone numbers.

A variant of this -which I posted last week in the forum- is to announce that you have won a scholarship you've never applied for...


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lexical  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 13:25
Portuguese to English
It's natural... May 16, 2007

Of course, we'd all naturally expect a major Australian lottery to have its administrative offices in Nigeria, wouldn't we (???). Where else? I mean, it's so believable, isn't it (???).

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Patricia Ramirez  Identity Verified
Dominican Republic
Local time: 07:25
English to Spanish
+ ...
People do fall for it May 16, 2007

I saw a woman being interviewed on tv that fell for this type of scam (she was trying to help someone that was having ¨surgery¨). She ended up losing around USD$50,000. Supposedly, the man needed someone with a U.S. bank account, so that he could avoid international fees...and they had the lottery scammers too on that show, and they showed how they send letters out in this official looking stationery to make it seem believable. They also showed a raid in Nigeria...these people operate from internet cafés!

Patricia


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PAS  Identity Verified
Local time: 13:25
English to Polish
+ ...
Ho hum May 16, 2007

The 419 scam (i.e. the "I have twenty gazillion dollars but can't get my hands on it and need your help) is really old hat...

For some wholesome entertainment visit here:
http://www.419eater.com/

to see how some enterprising souls play the "scamming the scammers" game.

Cheers,
Pawel Skalinski


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Ledja  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:25
Member (2008)
English to Albanian
+ ...
I found this one blatantly...amusing May 16, 2007

I recently had a friend of mine from Italy email me the details of an allegedly UK lottary win for translation. He wanted to answer back. I wrote a short reply for him to send and also advised him that it was probably a scam.

He went through with the reply, and in the end was asked for administration fees of about a thousand pounds from a "solicitor", who gave his name and house address (!!!) for the transfer of money through Western Union (!!!). Now that was daring! Couldn't help writing this for my friend to send back - with a grin: "I will fly to London with a few friends of mine and drop the money myself at your address - very kind of you to share it."

Never heard from him again.

I later checked the names that came with the emails and some turned out in many scam warning websites.


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Vito Smolej
Germany
Local time: 13:25
Member (2004)
English to Slovenian
+ ...
Have you checked for his photo? May 18, 2007

I later checked the names that came with the emails and some turned out in many scam warning websites.


If 419eater site does not have it yet, it would probably be time to have some hobby eater involved.

[Edited at 2007-05-18 06:35]


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Another blatant money laundering scheme from Nigeria

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