problems with Thunderbird email
Thread poster: MariusV

MariusV  Identity Verified
Lithuania
Local time: 11:17
English to Lithuanian
+ ...
Jan 6, 2010

Hi folks,

I have one problem - I use Thunderbird email service and I have LOTS of emails accumulated in it. Still have LOTS of emails on my internet (host) which I want to take into Thunderbird...

The problem is that my HDD is "virtually" divided into C: and D: disks - C: is just used for Windows and Office, and D: - to store all data, and so on (just to protect myself if Windows crashes and need to reinstall it)...And my Thunderbird with email data is also stored on C: which has very little of memory remaining...

Tried to take a couple of hundred emails into Thunderbird from webmail and the PC starts to "cry" that I have very little memory remaining on C: I wanted to move several THOUSAND of Thunderbird emails to drive D: (or to record them into a DVD-R disk), but I am afraid to touch these emails which are now on disk C: because if something bad happens to them (emails are from year 2006), it will be a total catastrophy for me...Also it is very strange as HOW Thunderbird email data is stored - I thought this will be like a separate folder for emails with subfolders (Inbox, Sent emails, etc.) with separate "email files" (for each individual email), but, for example, several thousand of emails in my Thunderbird are stored as ONE huge data file (of several GB)...Won't anything happen if I copy this huge file from C: to D: and then delete it from C: to free up the memory on C: ? I am afraid to do that...

Any advice?













[Edited at 2010-01-06 04:32 GMT]

[Edited at 2010-01-06 04:34 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

QUOI  Identity Verified

Chinese to English
+ ...
change TB default mail storage location to D: Jan 6, 2010

I usually backup TB emails by copying the whole profile folder (in Vista, it is under: C:\Users\username\AppData\Roaming\Thunderbird) which contains settings as well as downloaded emails. If you want to save emails directly onto D:, then in TB account settings, change "local directory" to a folder on D: or on your computer where you have ample storage space.

[Edited at 2010-01-06 06:23 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Woodstock  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 10:17
German to English
+ ...
Another possible solution: External storage device Jan 6, 2010

You might want to consider acquiring an external storage device as a backup for ALL of your work, in case the whole computer breaks down (god forbid!), and not just the C: drive. They are not that expensive anymore, and give great peace of mind. Then you could just keep what you really need on your working PC and the memory freed up. It must be slowing down your work on the PC quite a bit. And (normally) you can access your files on an external drive without any problem as long as the device is connected without the risk of the files being damaged if anything drastic should happen.

While keeping the C: drive small with the purpose of only running Windows and Office on it is a good idea, the reality is that it so often happens when you download programs they dump stuff onto the C: drive even if you instruct the main program to be downloaded to the D: drive. I've had that problem, too, i.e. all good intentions to that end don't work too well in this case. The C: drive gets fuller and fuller with all the patches and updates from Windows alone, so that you end up getting squeezed for space, as you are experiencing now. So I got an external drive, and am quite happy with it.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

QUOI  Identity Verified

Chinese to English
+ ...
disk partitions Jan 6, 2010

I wouldn't be bothered with partitioning a HDD into 2 or more virtual ones these days if I am only running one newish system on a single computer. If a single HDD fails physically, no matter how many partitions you have on it, the whole disk becomes inaccessible. Some may argue partitions are a good idea for sorting files and info. But this can also be achieved with folders. Disk partitions create unnecessary overheads and force the reading head to jump constantly from C: to another partition in order to fetch data.

Backup regularly to a different medium (ie an external HDD or DVD) is the key. A bit off-topic.

[Edited at 2010-01-06 21:03 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Piotr Bienkowski  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 10:17
Member (2005)
English to Polish
+ ...
Not only change paths, you can move the folders Jan 6, 2010

words@large wrote:

I usually backup TB emails by copying the whole profile folder (in Vista, it is under: C:\Users\username\AppData\Roaming\Thunderbird) which contains settings as well as downloaded emails. If you want to save emails directly onto D:, then in TB account settings, change "local directory" to a folder on D: or on your computer where you have ample storage space.

[Edited at 2010-01-06 06:23 GMT]


You can also physically move your e-mail folders to th drive that has more space. Thunderbird will recognize them. I did that, so I know.

Regards,

Piotr


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Vito Smolej
Germany
Local time: 10:17
Member (2004)
English to Slovenian
+ ...
Huh? Jan 6, 2010

MariusV wrote:
...several thousand of emails in my Thunderbird are stored as ONE huge data file (of several GB)...


excuse me !? ... which version are you using!? Look at your thunderbird profile subdirectory - or TB help for starters -. The data are structured as you would like to see them structured - from ever, for sure since 2.x versions.

Regards


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 10:17
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
+ ...
Some points Jan 7, 2010

MariusV wrote:
The problem is that my HDD is "virtually" divided into C: and D: disks - C: is just used for Windows and Office, and D: - to store all data.


You would not have this problem is you were using Windows 95 (joke, sorry).

Go Tools... Accounts... Server settings... and select a new mail location for "Local directory" at the bottom of the dialog. I'm not sure how easy it would be to move existing mail into the new location -- prepare yourself for some frustration. TB is notorious for not being able to import its own files.

Also it is very strange as HOW Thunderbird email data is stored - I thought this will be like a separate folder for emails with subfolders (Inbox, Sent emails, etc.) with separate "email files" (for each individual email), but, for example, several thousand of emails in my Thunderbird are stored as ONE huge data file (of several GB)...


This is the standard MBOX mail format which is very common. Essentially, all mail for a single "folder" are stored in a single file. If you want smaller mail files, create separate "folders" in TB, move the mail into it.

Remember to compress your mailboxes regularly, or at least before you move them. Otherwise your deleted mail (or moved mail) may show up in their original locations again (the same thing happens in other mail programs, by the way).

If you feel really adventurous, you can edit the mail files in Notepad to manually delete mail or manually split the file into separate "folders" (but I wouldn't do that).

Also, TB doesn't store attachments separately. See, attachments aren't really attached -- they're actually part of the e-mail, but TB displays them separately. In the mail file itself, however, the attachment forms part of the same file, so if you have lots of attachments, you'll have a big mail file. Some e-mail programs remove attachments from incoming mails and store them in a separate location... which has advantages and disadvantages.

Some e-mail programs store all mail in a single file, regardless of whether you have subfolders. Some versions of Outlook do this (does the newest version do it too?). Calypso stores *everything* (including address books etc) in a single file... which is great for making backups (one file only) but not great if you have 100 MB of mail and your computer only has a floppy drive (that was 10 years ago, by the way).


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Katalin Horváth McClure  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 04:17
Member (2002)
English to Hungarian
+ ...
Size of email folder - do you use compacting? Jan 7, 2010

One another thing to consider is that the size of the email folder may not be the true size that you actually need. What I mean is that apparently all email is physically still stored (or the space is not freed up) until you "Compact" the folders. What I mean is deleting the unnecessary emails would only move them to the Trash, and emptying the Trash would still not free up the space. You need to use the "Compact folders" option in the File menu to actually finally get rid of unwanted stuff. Compacting can be set to be done automatically when the folder size reaches the specified size - right now I don't have time to look up exactly where that setting is, but you could try the compacting business to see if the actual file size improves.
Katalin


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Danielle Maxson
United States
Local time: 04:17
Spanish to English
+ ...
Link to Mozilla Help Jan 7, 2010

I have also backed up by just copying my entire profile, but I've learned a lot just by reading these answers and plan to try some of the other solutions here. If none of them is exactly what you want, you could check out www.mozillazine.org, which is full of useful information for Mozilla applications, including Thunderbird and Firefox. They have a knowledge base for common problems and forums in case the knowledge base entries don't answer your question. Good luck!

Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

problems with Thunderbird email

Advanced search






Déjà Vu X3
Try it, Love it

Find out why Déjà Vu is today the most flexible, customizable and user-friendly tool on the market. See the brand new features in action: *Completely redesigned user interface *Live Preview *Inline spell checking *Inline

More info »
SDL Trados Studio 2017 Freelance
The leading translation software used by over 250,000 translators.

SDL Trados Studio 2017 helps translators increase translation productivity whilst ensuring quality. Combining translation memory, terminology management and machine translation in one simple and easy-to-use environment.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search