Pages in topic:   [1 2] >
viewing old Cyrillic font "Academy" in Word 2007
Thread poster: Deborah Hoffman
Deborah Hoffman  Identity Verified

Local time: 20:41
Russian to English
+ ...
Jan 31, 2010

Hello fellow translators,
I'm most of the way through translating a book from Russian to English. I've been doing it chapter by chapter since the author is making changes to each chapter before sending them along. The last part of the book we have discovered is largely in an older Cyrillic non-Unicode font called Academy that will only display on my screen as what looks like lowercase Roman letters with dots. I tried having him send me the font itself and installing it in Windows/Fonts but that did not help. Other than trying an old computer, does anyone have any ideas?

The other option is to have the rest of the book scanned into .pdf and then run through something like FineReader, which I do not have. Or, to use an online converter that takes 2-3 lines of text at a time and will put them into something Word will process. I'm not sure which process makes me shudder more.

All suggestions welcome!

Here is what it looks like:

È ãäå ñòîëï îáëà÷íûé, êîòîðûé äàë (âîäàì) ðàññòóïèòüñÿ? Äà è êàê áû ðàññòóïèëîñü ìîðå ÿçûöåâ?”


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Adam Łobatiuk  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 02:41
Member (2009)
English to Polish
+ ...
Web browser Jan 31, 2010

What often helps is saving such text as a TXT or HTML file, opening it in a web browser, and playing with the available Cyrillic encodings until you find the one that works. Your example didn't work on my computer, but you might still try on yours. If that doesn't work either, it is quite possible that the font was customized and scanning might be the only solution.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Marina Aleyeva  Identity Verified
Ukraine
Local time: 03:41
English to Russian
+ ...
Use Fix Broken Text function (if it still exists in Word 2007) Jan 31, 2010

I am able to repair your text using Tools -> Fix Broken Text in Word 2000. I am not sure if a similar option exists in Word 2007, but if it does, it might help. Otherwise just send me the document, and I will repair it for you.

UPD: It seems that this feature was removed in Word 2007, but you can still
download the Word Font Repair Macro from the Microsoft Download Center

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc179199.aspx



[Edited at 2010-01-31 14:17 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Marina Aleyeva  Identity Verified
Ukraine
Local time: 03:41
English to Russian
+ ...
There is also an online converter that you can use on larger chunks Jan 31, 2010

http://www.artlebedev.ru/tools/decoder/

Direct link Reply with quote
 
Deborah Hoffman  Identity Verified

Local time: 20:41
Russian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
cursing microsoft Jan 31, 2010

Their Technet page for Word 2007 helpfully suggests downloading the "low-use feature" of Word Font Repair Macro from the Microsoft Download Center. However this Macro will not install in Word 2007, only in Word 2000 - why do they bother telling people this?

I'll try some of the other things and am grateful for people's suggestions; I feel hopeful something can work.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 01:41
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
Decoding key Feb 1, 2010

I once worked out a key for decoding this, but I can't remember now how I did it!
Obviously you won't want to decode the whole thing manually, so this isn't a solution to the problem, but here it is:

à = а
á = б
â = в
ã = г
ä = д
å = е
æ = ж
ç = з
è = и
é = й
ê = к
ë = л
ì = м
í = н
î = о
ï = п
ð = р
ñ = с
ò = т
ó = ы
ô = ф
õ = х
ö = ц
÷ = ч
ø = ш
ù = щ
ú = ъ
û = ы
ü = ь
ý = э
þ = ю
ÿ = я

So È ãäå ñòîëï îáëà÷íûé, êîòîðûé äàë (âîäàì) ðàññòóïèòüñÿ? Äà è êàê áû ðàññòóïèëîñü ìîðå ÿçûöåâ becomes И где столп облачный, который дал (водам) расстыпиться? Да и как бы расстыпилось море языцев?

[Edited at 2010-02-01 11:48 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
NetLynx  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:41
English to Danish
+ ...
Thanks to Jack ... Feb 1, 2010

- it will then be rather easy to use "Word's Search and replace" {Ctrl + B} 32 times.
Hope that works.

Best
NetLynx


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Wondering Nov 17, 2011

Deborah Hoffman wrote:

Hello fellow translators,
I'm most of the way through translating a book from Russian to English. I've been doing it chapter by chapter since the author is making changes to each chapter before sending them along. The last part of the book we have discovered is largely in an older Cyrillic non-Unicode font called Academy that will only display on my screen as what looks like lowercase Roman letters with dots. I tried having him send me the font itself and installing it in Windows/Fonts but that did not help. Other than trying an old computer, does anyone have any ideas?

The other option is to have the rest of the book scanned into .pdf and then run through something like FineReader, which I do not have. Or, to use an online converter that takes 2-3 lines of text at a time and will put them into something Word will process. I'm not sure which process makes me shudder more.

All suggestions welcome!

Here is what it looks like:

È ãäå ñòîëï îáëà÷íûé, êîòîðûé äàë (âîäàì) ðàññòóïèòüñÿ? Äà è êàê áû ðàññòóïèëîñü ìîðå ÿçûöåâ?”

Hi,
I was wondering if you ever found a solution? I am having similar issues. A professor here at the university wrote a document in MacWrite II back in 1998, and I have been trying to find a way to properly view them. They open up in MS Word 2007, however, the fonts do not display correctly.

Here is an example:
can (not): - -a ol-#-a olma-
-(i)w ˆ poss.ˆ mumkin (/mas)

I personally cannot read Cyrillic and therefore am not sure if all of the symbols besides the obvious "#" are screwed up or just a few. This is a brief document in Uzbek language structure using Cyrillic alphabet, but again, it does not display correctly, and she has many more documents of this nature (not just in Uzbek language, but others as well).

I have also tried to convert the original MacWrite II document into other formats like "doc" and "rtf" formats but this does not seem to help.

Moreover, opening the file in a web browser and coursing through the various encoding types did not help either. I am wondering if we should conduct a Craigslist/online search for an old computer from 1998 and the old programs she used and purchase them to see if that will work? Or is there a better solution?

Thanks

[Edited at 2011-11-17 22:01 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
esperantisto  Identity Verified
Local time: 03:41
Member (2006)
English to Russian
+ ...
A totally different case Nov 18, 2011

clenelc wrote:
I am having similar issues.


You have totally different issues, because a) you use Mac, not Windows, and b) you use something that you call MacWrite II, not MS Word, and c) your issue is about Uzbek, not Russian or any Slavic language.

a) Mac (up to MacOS 9) was notorious for its MacCyrillic encoding not compatible with any other platform.

b) What is MacWrite II? Meaning, what is its file format? Is it plain-text or half-binary (like MS Word doc)? Is it based on MacCyrillic, or, say, cp1251, or Unicode, or anything else?

c) There was never any proper support for non-Slavic Cyrillic alphabets before Unicode, with 8-bit character sets. Thus, if that MacWrite II uses plain text in an 8-bit encoding, Uzbek can be represented only by a surrogate, meaning replacing some standard Cyrillic letters with specific Uzbek ones. In such a case, you can simply run a find&replace routine similar to described above. Or it can use some other ways.

They open up in MS Word 2007, however, the fonts do not display correctly.

Here is an example:
can (not): - -a ol-#-a olma-
-(i)w ˆ poss.ˆ mumkin (/mas)


This extract is of little help, unless someone, who knows the very document, happens to read this topic. To find a solution, you/your professor should better share the file or a part of it.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Thanks Nov 22, 2011

esperantisto wrote:

clenelc wrote:
I am having similar issues.


You have totally different issues, because a) you use Mac, not Windows, and b) you use something that you call MacWrite II, not MS Word, and c) your issue is about Uzbek, not Russian or any Slavic language.

a) Mac (up to MacOS 9) was notorious for its MacCyrillic encoding not compatible with any other platform.

b) What is MacWrite II? Meaning, what is its file format? Is it plain-text or half-binary (like MS Word doc)? Is it based on MacCyrillic, or, say, cp1251, or Unicode, or anything else?

c) There was never any proper support for non-Slavic Cyrillic alphabets before Unicode, with 8-bit character sets. Thus, if that MacWrite II uses plain text in an 8-bit encoding, Uzbek can be represented only by a surrogate, meaning replacing some standard Cyrillic letters with specific Uzbek ones. In such a case, you can simply run a find&replace routine similar to described above. Or it can use some other ways.

They open up in MS Word 2007, however, the fonts do not display correctly.

Here is an example:
can (not): - -a ol-#-a olma-
-(i)w ˆ poss.ˆ mumkin (/mas)


This extract is of little help, unless someone, who knows the very document, happens to read this topic. To find a solution, you/your professor should better share the file or a part of it.

Hello,
Not sure if you were trying to sound rude, or if I misread it, but in any case, thanks for the reply. I was going to start a new topic, but thought to search first and see if there was already a thread here about this topic and as I was reading through the thread, the issue felt very familiar to what I am experiencing.

I apologize if me posting this in the wrong place is frustrating, but I will try to explain it a little more clearly because it may help the issue:
A professor has several files that she created in the mid-late 90s on an old Mac machine. When the school upgraded machines years ago, all her files migrated to the new machine (now ancient itself obviously), and I am not sure exactly when after that she had problems opening these files, but she asked me to look at them for her last week. I was probably 11 or 12 when all this computer upgrading and things occured, so I don't know the exact details, but any who, I had her send me one of the files from her current Mac computer so that I can investigate them further. I am using a Windows XP computer and the file she sent me had no extension, so there was no way to identify what kind of program it was associated with. I did some research and found a program that could ID it by its binary code signature and that's where I got the Macwrite II program name, which is also a very old program! The professor herself does not remember what kind of programs she used, but the file is most likely a Macwrite II file that used whatever kind of Cyrillic font at the time. I am not sure if anyone else can help her, so I thought to look around for her on my own and landed here. I realize that Uzbek and Russian are not the same language, but Uzbek does use Cyrillic script and I thought that any place that deals with Russian and Cyrillic fonts could be a resource for her problem.

As for Macwrite II, I have no idea what it is, or was. Your guess is as good as mine. But the point you brought up about MacCyrillic encoding and non-Slavic support was very helpful, thank you. I tried to convert the old Macwrite II file to various formats such as RTF, different type of DOC formats, using "Conversions Plus" (discontinued, but I was able to get a copy thankfully!), but nothing seemed to help. They all displayed the characters the way I posted earlier, so I am assuming that perhaps the original file is either somehow corrupted, or the font encoding information does not come across properly during the conversions, that's why we see the same exact characters displayed throughout the different formats.

Unfortunately, this is a very old file that was created around 1998 and it seems that there is probably no way to properly display it the way it was intended to be displayed. And I doubt that it will be seen by someone who know the document, but I will put it here just in case.

Thanks again for the reply, it was very helpful. I will let her know that she may have to try to go back and just fix the errors manually in the files and update them to current fonts, etc., which is better than losing the entire document. Or, another plausible solution might be to find an old computer from the time she was writing these documents, and purchase it through Craigslist, or eBay, etc. and then track down this program and font set, then maybe open these documents in there and somehow export them properly? (Or even print them and then scan them and use character recognition programs like Adobe PDF that has the OCR function?)

Thanks
---------------

CHART: 3

EQUIVALENT CONSTRUCTIONS FOR ENGLISH MODAL VERBS


can (not): - -a ol-#-a olma-
-(i)w ˆ poss.ˆ mumkin (/mas)

could (not): -a oldim#-a olmadim (va ≈okazo)
-(i)w ˆ poss. ˆ mumkin /di#mumkin /mas /di

he/she/it can (not): -(i)b b¨lmajdi

he/she/it could (not): -(i)b b¨lmadi

shall (not): -aman#-majman (va ≈okazo)

should -(i)wˆ poss. ˆ lozim (/mas)

should not -maslik ˆ poss.ˆ lozim

will (not): -a man#-majman (va ≈okazo)
-moºhiman#-moºhi /masman (va ≈okazo)

I will: -(a)j(in) (birov birovdan iltimos ºilganda
iwlatiladigan forma)

1) must (not): -(i)w ˆ poss.ˆ kerak (/mas)
(have to/had to) -(i)w ˆ poss. ˆ kerak /di#kerak /mas /di
-(i)w ˆ poss. ˆ wart (/di)#/mas (/di)
-(i)wˆga ma'burman#ma'bur b¨lib ºoldim (va ≈okazo)

2) must (doubt) -sa (ˆ poss.) ˆ kerak (/di)

would (habituality): -a(r) /di#-mas /di (va ≈okazo)

would (subjunctive): -(a)r /di#-mas /di (va ≈okazo)
(would have)

may: -sa ˆ poss. endings ˆ b¨ladi(mi)
-(i)w ˆ poss. ˆ mumkin(mi)

may I/may I not? -(a)j(in)mi#-maj(in)mi*

might: -(a)rman (va ≈okazo)
-sa (ˆ poss. endings ) b¨lar /di.
-(i) w ˆ poss. ˆ mumkin /di.

need (not): personal pronoun/noun + dative case + subject noun ˆ
kerak#zarur#lozim (/mas).
misol% menga kitob kerak (zarur, lozim).


[Edited at 2011-11-22 20:51 GMT]

[Edited at 2011-11-22 20:52 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
esperantisto  Identity Verified
Local time: 03:41
Member (2006)
English to Russian
+ ...
Really about Cyrillic? Nov 23, 2011

clenelc wrote:

should not -maslik ˆ poss.ˆ lozim


Is the issue really about the Cyrillic? For example, lozim is definitely written with plain Latin letters and stands for need(ed), necessity, necessary. So is keraketc. I mean, I can read Uzbek words there and see nothing missing (however, I’m not fluent in the language, I only understand something because it’s close to Turkish). Or you’ve managed somehow to convert it to Latin. The ˆ symbols perhaps are some special non-letter symbols. Anyway, I’d advise to share the file using any file-sharing site such as filesonic.com.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

István Hirsch  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:41
English to Hungarian
Workaround Nov 23, 2011

I do not know if Jack’s solution works or not, but if it works, you do not have to perform Find/Replace 32 times. Just download a software capable of performing batch replace (for example Advanced Find and Replace /free download/) and replace everything in a single step.

Direct link Reply with quote
 
esperantisto  Identity Verified
Local time: 03:41
Member (2006)
English to Russian
+ ...
With a macro Nov 23, 2011

István Hirsch wrote:

you do not have to perform Find/Replace 32 times. Just download a software capable of performing batch replace (for example Advanced Find and Replace /free download/) and replace everything in a single step.


There’s no need in any third-party software, as you can do it within a word processor. Here’s a macro for OpenOffice.org/LibreOffice:

Code:
REM  *****  Recode from cp1252 to cp1251 for Word and Excel files without language set.
REM ***** Authors Dmitry G. Mastrukov and A. Novodroskii 2002
REM ***** GPL license


Dim mCP1252(123) As String
Dim mCP1251(123) As String

Sub Init
mCP1252() = Array("€","‚","¸","„","…","†","‡","ˆ","‰","Š","‹","Œ","Ž", _
"‘","’","“","”","•","–","—","™","š","›","œ","¡","ž", _
"Ÿ"," ","¡","¢","£","¤","¥","¦","§","¨","©","ª","«", _
"¬","­","®","¯","°","±","²","³","´","µ","¶","·","¸", _
"¹","º","»","¼","½","¾","¿","À","Á","Â","Ã","Ä","Å", _
"Æ","Ç","È","É","Ê","Ë","Ì","Í","Î","Ï","Ð","Ñ","Ò", _
"Ó","Ô","Õ","Ö","×","Ø","Ù","Ú","Û","Ü","Ý","Þ","ß", _
"à","á","â","ã","ä","å","æ","ç","è","é","ê","ë","ì", _
"í","î","ï","ð","ñ","ò","ó","ô","õ","ö","÷","ø","ù", _
"ú","û","ü","ý","þ","ÿ")
mCP1251() = Array("Ђ","‚","ё","„","…","†","‡","€","‰","Љ","‹","Њ","Ћ", _
"‘","’","“","”","•","–","—","™","љ","›","њ","ќ","ћ", _
"џ"," ","Ў","ў","Ј","¤","Ґ","¦","§","Ё","©","Є","«", _
"¬","­","®","Ї","°","±","І","і","ґ","µ","¶","·","ё", _
"№","є","»","ј","Ѕ","ѕ","ї","А","Б","В","Г","Д","Е", _
"Ж","З","И","Й","К","Л","М","Н","О","П","Р","С","Т", _
"У","Ф","Х","Ц","Ч","Ш","Щ","Ъ","Ы","Ь","Э","Ю","Я", _
"а","б","в","г","д","е","ж","з","и","й","к","л","м", _
"н","о","п","р","с","т","у","ф","х","ц","ч","ш","щ", _
"ъ","ы","ь","э","ю","я")

End Sub

Sub RecodeAllWriter
Dim n As Long
Dim oDocument As Object
Dim oReplace As Object
Init()
oDocument = ThisComponent
oReplace = oDocument.createReplaceDescriptor
For n = lbound(mCP1252()) To ubound(mCP1252())
oReplace.SearchString = mCP1252(n)
oReplace.ReplaceString = mCP1251(n)
oReplace.SearchCaseSensitive = TRUE
oDocument.replaceAll(oReplace)
Next n
MsgBox "Преобразовано"
End Sub

Sub RecodeAllCalc
Dim n As Long
Dim m As Long
Dim oDocument As Object
Dim oReplace As Object
Init()
On error goto ex
oDocument = ThisComponent
m = 0
While 1 = 1
oReplace = oDocument.Sheets(m).createReplaceDescriptor
For n = lbound(mCP1252()) To ubound(mCP1252())
oReplace.SearchString = mCP1252(n)
oReplace.ReplaceString = mCP1251(n)
oReplace.SearchCaseSensitive = TRUE
oDocument.Sheets(m).replaceAll(oReplace)
Next n
m = m + 1
Wend
ex:
MsgBox "Преобразовано"
End Sub



The macro cures the situation as described in the initial posting (i. e., a document created in a pre-Unicode version of MS Word or Excel with a non-Unicode font with the language incorrectly specified). Obviously, a similar code can be written for MS Word, but I’m not proficient in VBA. However, for Uzbek another solution is (very likely) needed.

[Edited at 2011-11-23 08:27 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Filesonic Dec 6, 2011

esperantisto wrote:

clenelc wrote:

should not -maslik ˆ poss.ˆ lozim


Is the issue really about the Cyrillic? For example, lozim is definitely written with plain Latin letters and stands for need(ed), necessity, necessary. So is keraketc. I mean, I can read Uzbek words there and see nothing missing (however, I’m not fluent in the language, I only understand something because it’s close to Turkish). Or you’ve managed somehow to convert it to Latin. The ˆ symbols perhaps are some special non-letter symbols. Anyway, I’d advise to share the file using any file-sharing site such as filesonic.com.


Hello,
Thanks for the replies everyone! I uploaded the file here: http://www.2shared.com/document/rpSFDGah/3__Modal_verbs_copy_1.html

(Filesonic has too many loops to jump through!)

I see what you are saying, but perhaps if you look at it, we will be able to gain more insight into the issue.

Thanks again!

[Edited at 2011-12-06 21:51 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
esperantisto  Identity Verified
Local time: 03:41
Member (2006)
English to Russian
+ ...
No Cyrillic Dec 7, 2011

The page that you’ve shared contains no Cyrillic letter, not even a trace. Uzbek words there are written with Latin script. There are only some characters such as #^°¨ that have, probably, some special meaning. They are formatted with some New York font missing in my system. Google says, this font was used in old versions of MacOS, and I can’t find it available for download. If you find someone with an old Mac who can share the font, you’ll be able to the the characters displayed correctly, I think. Unfortunately, I can’t help here, as I don’t know (have never known actually) anyone with a Mac.

Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pages in topic:   [1 2] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

viewing old Cyrillic font "Academy" in Word 2007

Advanced search






Protemos translation business management system
Create your account in minutes, and start working! 3-month trial for agencies, and free for freelancers!

The system lets you keep client/vendor database, with contacts and rates, manage projects and assign jobs to vendors, issue invoices, track payments, store and manage project files, generate business reports on turnover profit per client/manager etc.

More info »
Déjà Vu X3
Try it, Love it

Find out why Déjà Vu is today the most flexible, customizable and user-friendly tool on the market. See the brand new features in action: *Completely redesigned user interface *Live Preview *Inline spell checking *Inline

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search