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Help with symbol
Thread poster: Reed James

Reed James
Chile
Local time: 21:53
Member (2005)
Spanish to English
Jan 28, 2016

Hi,

I'm trying to type a symbol used in measurements. It's a zero or more like an o with a slash going diagonally from upper right to lower left. As in 12" (this funny slashed symbol). Does anyone know how to enter it in Word? Maybe an alt + numpad combination? Thanks.


Reed


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Dan Lucas  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:53
Member (2014)
Japanese to English
alt + keypad 157 Jan 28, 2016

Reed James wrote:
It's a zero or more like an o with a slash going diagonally from upper right to lower left.

Maybe alt + keypad 157 (Ø)

Edit: or the diameter symbol.

Dan



[Edited at 2016-01-28 21:01 GMT]


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Tony M  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 01:53
Member
French to English
+ ...
For a lower-case version Jan 28, 2016

Alt + 0248 > ø

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Teresa Borges
Portugal
Local time: 00:53
Member (2007)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Or Jan 28, 2016

https://support.office.com/en-us/article/Insert-a-symbol-or-special-character-81e64967-74c0-4fd9-814a-3aa867d4cfce#bm1

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Oliver Walter  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:53
Member (2005)
German to English
+ ...
Not 157 Jan 28, 2016

In my case (Word 2000; probably also later versions) they are: Alt+0216 for the big one (Ø) and
Alt+0248 for the little one (ø).
These are the values defined in the ISO-8859-1 character set.
(0216 and 0248 are typed on the numeric keypad, not the top row of number keys of the main part of the keyboard)

Note: you need the initial zero (0) for some, but not all, of the ISO-8859-1 characters.
ISO-8859-1 and Windows-1252 are the same for most of the characters they contain. They are both listed in printable tables in Wikipedia.

It is in order to make it easy to type such characters (and the accented ones like ü and é) that it is useful to have a keyboard with a separate numeric keypad; using the top row of number keys instead of those on the numeric keypad (or the main keyboard switched into keypad mode) will not produce the same result.

[Edited at 2016-01-28 21:51 GMT]


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Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:53
Member (2000)
Russian to English
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Install Swedish keyboard. Jan 28, 2016

I don't know Swedish but I have the keyboard installed and use it for this and one or two other characters. I also switch to French keyboard for accents, German keyboard for umlaut etc. I don't think this is any harder than Alt and a four-figure code, and it has the advantage that it can be used not only in Word, but in a browser and other applications.

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Achmad Fuad Lubis  Identity Verified
Indonesia
Local time: 07:53
Member (2015)
English to Indonesian
+ ...
Choice of symbols and characters available in Microsoft Word 2010 Jan 29, 2016

I use Microsoft Word 2010. This provides a selection table of Symbols and Special Characters in many fonts, and character codes from ASCII (dec), ASCII (hex) and Unicode (hex). Click ‘Insert’ and select 'Symbol' and if necessary select ‘More Symbols’ . Various Shortcut Keys are also offered. The table format is very convenient to use in addition to AutoCorrect key.

[Edited at 2016-01-29 03:36 GMT]


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esperantisto  Identity Verified
Local time: 03:53
Member (2006)
English to Russian
+ ...
Strictly speaking… Jan 29, 2016

… using characters ø and Ø (Latin letter O with stroke) is incorrect for the case, ⌀ (diameter sign, U+8960) should be used instead.

Jack Doughty wrote:

I don't know Swedish but I have the keyboard installed and use it for this and one or two other characters. I also switch to French keyboard for accents, German keyboard for umlaut etc.


Perhaps, you should try the international layout (assuming that you use M$ Windows, Linux is even more versatile).

[Edited at 2016-01-29 07:52 GMT]


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neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 01:53
Spanish to English
+ ...
Shortcut for this dummy required Jan 29, 2016

Oliver Walter wrote:

In my case (Word 2000; probably also later versions) they are: Alt+0216 for the big one (Ø) and
Alt+0248 for the little one (ø).
These are the values defined in the ISO-8859-1 character set.
(0216 and 0248 are typed on the numeric keypad, not the top row of number keys of the main part of the keyboard)

Note: you need the initial zero (0) for some, but not all, of the ISO-8859-1 characters.
ISO-8859-1 and Windows-1252 are the same for most of the characters they contain. They are both listed in printable tables in Wikipedia.

It is in order to make it easy to type such characters (and the accented ones like ü and é) that it is useful to have a keyboard with a separate numeric keypad; using the top row of number keys instead of those on the numeric keypad (or the main keyboard switched into keypad mode) will not produce the same result.

[Edited at 2016-01-28 21:51 GMT]


It's handy to know that it must be typed on the numeric keypad, not the top row of number keys of the main part of the keyboard - I wasn't aware of this.
However, I'm using Office 2010 and the combination Dan suggests (alt + keypad 157) opens up WordFast Classic on my PC. The ALT + 0216 command doesn't seem to do anything except position the cursor at the start of the text. Maybe I'm doing something wrong? ( I assume we don't need to type in the + sign)...

I hasten to add that I only tried out these keypad combinations out of curiosity. I also tried out a couple of other combinations and all I get is a message saying something about macros being disabled.

Even curioser, when I try to dictate this text using Dragon instead of typing, the text keeps defaulting to the top of the page/or proz text box... but I'm too busy (and too IT-ignorant) to start faffing about with settings etc right now...


[Edited at 2016-01-29 09:56 GMT]

PS: I sometimes get round issues like these by simply copying and pasting the symbol from the original text (if it appears there).

[Edited at 2016-01-29 09:59 GMT]


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Oliver Walter  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:53
Member (2005)
German to English
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Keypad Jan 29, 2016

neilmac wrote:
The ALT + 0216 command doesn't seem to do anything except position the cursor at the start of the text. Maybe I'm doing something wrong? ( I assume we don't need to type in the + sign)...

No; it's a convention introduced, I think, by Microsoft years ago: Alt+0216 means "type 0216 on the numeric keypad while pressing the Alt key"
Another point: "Num Lock" must be in force, as otherwise the keys on the keypad have different meanings (which can be seen on the keys): e.g. 7, 8 and 9 are Home, Up-arrow and PgUp when"Num Lock" is off.
On my separate keyboard (which has a separate numeric keypad) there's a Num Lock key; pressing it switches between NumLock and not-Numlock, with a beep and an LED shows the NumLock state. On the laptop's own keyboard this is done with Fn+F11 (Fn is a key near the bottom left of the keyboard and F11 is in the top row).


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neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 01:53
Spanish to English
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Cheers Jan 29, 2016

Oliver Walter wrote:

neilmac wrote:
The ALT + 0216 command doesn't seem to do anything except position the cursor at the start of the text. Maybe I'm doing something wrong? ( I assume we don't need to type in the + sign)...

No; it's a convention introduced, I think, by Microsoft years ago: Alt+0216 means "type 0216 on the numeric keypad while pressing the Alt key"
Another point: "Num Lock" must be in force, as otherwise the keys on the keypad have different meanings (which can be seen on the keys): e.g. 7, 8 and 9 are Home, Up-arrow and PgUp when"Num Lock" is off.
On my separate keyboard (which has a separate numeric keypad) there's a Num Lock key; pressing it switches between NumLock and not-Numlock, with a beep and an LED shows the NumLock state. On the laptop's own keyboard this is done with Fn+F11 (Fn is a key near the bottom left of the keyboard and F11 is in the top row).


Thanks for the heads-up. I usually keep my Numlock switched off, simply because the LED catches my eye and distracts me.

I just tried typing 0216 on the numeric keypad while pressing the Alt key here, and got this: Ï
When I try to do the same thing in a Word document, I get a Visual Basic message saying the macros have been disabled. I assume this is something to do with my general settings and I’m not going to start fiddling about with it now… but thanks for the info anyway, I will definitely look into this further when I have a bit more free time.

... Ï


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esperantisto  Identity Verified
Local time: 03:53
Member (2006)
English to Russian
+ ...
In Word, Jan 29, 2016

neilmac wrote:

I just tried typing 0216 on the numeric keypad while pressing the Alt key here, and got this: Ï
When I try to do the same thing in a Word document, I get a Visual Basic message


Instead, try the following trick: type in the character’s hexadecimal code, for example, to get Ø, type in d8 (or D8, the letter case does not matter) and press Alt+X. Or, if you want to get a proper character of , type in 2300 and press Alt+X.


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neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 01:53
Spanish to English
+ ...
Eureka! Jan 29, 2016

esperantisto wrote:

neilmac wrote:

I just tried typing 0216 on the numeric keypad while pressing the Alt key here, and got this: Ï
When I try to do the same thing in a Word document, I get a Visual Basic message


Instead, try the following trick: type in the character’s hexadecimal code, for example, to get Ø, type in d8 (or D8, the letter case does not matter) and press Alt+X. Or, if you want to get a proper character of , type in 2300 and press Alt+X.


That worked a treat! Is there a list of similar shortcuts somewhere I could copy for future reference?


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esperantisto  Identity Verified
Local time: 03:53
Member (2006)
English to Russian
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The shortcut… Jan 29, 2016

…is always the same: Alt+X (Word only). As for the character codes, use any reference. For example, Wikipedia.

[Edited at 2016-01-29 12:47 GMT]


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Oliver Walter  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:53
Member (2005)
German to English
+ ...
Web page about this Jan 29, 2016

There's a web page about such special characters, on the page entitled "Windows - Alt Key Numeric Codes" on the website of Penn State University (psu in the page address):

http://symbolcodes.tlt.psu.edu/accents/codealt.html


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