Does anyone use Access+Word for invoicing?
Thread poster: Stanislaw Kulikowski

Stanislaw Kulikowski  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 03:41
English to Polish
+ ...
Dec 2, 2005

I wonder if there is a cute way of linking a Word document (blank invoice) to an Access database, where I would record my jobs, klients, addresses, bank accounts, etc., to issue invoices simply choosing entries from the db.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Steven Sidore  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 03:41
Member (2003)
German to English
Why bother? Dec 2, 2005

Why add the complexity of importing to Word? I've simply designed a invoice report in Access that looks the same as my old Word-based invoice.

Once generated, it can then be exported to Word automatically, if you want. I prefer to print the report into a PDF for emailing and archiving.

Harness the power of Access, it's less fuss in the end.

[Edited at 2005-12-02 10:04]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Stanislaw Kulikowski  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 03:41
English to Polish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
I know next to nothing about Access Dec 2, 2005

I could make Word brew me a cup of coffee but when it comes to Access I'm completely lost. Is there some kind of tutorial? Is it worth it? Where are the stables so I could harness the beast?

[Edited at 2005-12-02 10:12]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Endre Both  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 03:41
Member (2002)
English to German
Access reports Dec 2, 2005

As Steven says, using reports in Access is considerably simpler as it saves you the interfacing part between both applications (which is of course possible).

Access reports offer less flexibility that Word (add or delete a line, make a column a tad smaller or wider to fit etc.), but if well-designed, they are perfect and easier to handle than Word files.

I have no particular experience with the Word export feature, the first and last time I tried (in Office 2000) it seemed quite limited, but not entirely useless.

Like Steven, I export to PDF.

Endre


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Stanislaw Kulikowski  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 03:41
English to Polish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
I don't insist on Word Dec 2, 2005

Obviously, I don't insist on Word. If Access does it, why bother. I suggested Word because I know it. So far I haven't had a need to work with Access, it appears that the invoicing issue is the only face of Access I need to know. So I am reluctant to learn the program to find out which functions serve the purpose and which don't. Any tips on selective learning?

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Endre Both  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 03:41
Member (2002)
English to German
Database basics + VBA programming Dec 2, 2005

Stanislaw, if you know the basics of database design and management, if you know your way around VBA programming (e.g. from Word), and if you have already designed a few forms in VB or VBA, then you should be able to get going quite easily -- if you like doing this stuff for fun. I stress the fun aspect because if you look at it like work, it's going to be a lot of work which won't pay off, and you'll probably be better off buying one of the countless invoicing applications available.

As to Access, there are hosts of books about it, find one or two with a stress on VBA programming and you're set. Obviously there are many resources on the web too, but a book with a well thought-out structure probably makes more sense at the beginning.

Endre


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Peter Bouillon  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 03:41
French to German
+ ...
Wouldn't want to do that. Dec 2, 2005

Stanislaw Kulikowski wrote:
I wonder if there is a cute way of linking a Word document (blank invoice) to an Access database,
issue invoices simply choosing entries from the db.[/quote]

Writing invoices is The Point Where You Earn Your Money. This is a delightful thing to do, so why shorten the pleasure by automating this?

P.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Stanislaw Kulikowski  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 03:41
English to Polish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Now, this is the part I have problems with Dec 2, 2005

Sometimes I have jobs done two or three months ago and still not invoiced. Believe it or not, sometimes the invoice is in the envelope already sitting on my desk for a week or two. I know, I know, I deserve spanking. I guess I need a secretary (for taking care of invoicing, not for spanking ).

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Aliseo Japan  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 10:41
Member
Italian to Japanese
+ ...
Quicken Dec 2, 2005

Stanislaw Kulikowski wrote:

I wonder if there is a cute way of linking a Word document (blank invoice) to an Access database, where I would record my jobs, klients, addresses, bank accounts, etc., to issue invoices simply choosing entries from the db.


Why not considering an accounting software with invoicing capabilities, such as Quicken for instance? I have been using it since seven or eight years now, keeping trace of both my personal and work economic and financial activities. By feeding in all of your expenses, invoices and payments as soon as they occur, you have an instant Profit & Loss image of your business, including receivables.

Mario Cerutti
http://www.aliseo.com


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Elizabeth Rudin  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:41
Member (2005)
Hungarian to English
+ ...
Have you tried Excel? Dec 2, 2005

I’m afraid I don’t know anything about Access, but I find that Excel works perfectly well for my accounts and invoicing.

I have a ‘Sales’ file (one for each year), with worksheets for each month. Each month I list all jobs in the order received (and on the day I receive them, to make sure I don’t miss any of them!), and invoice them when completed (or within a week or so, when I have the time). The row format that works for me is invoice no./date/client name/ PO or job no./language pair/project description/word or hour count/rate per 1000 words or hour/net amount/VAT/gross amount/date paid/outstanding (gross amount repeated).
The “outstanding” column is very useful – I delete amounts when paid, but I can always tell at a glance (from the bottom line) how much is still outstanding for a certain month. I find the automatic calculations in Excel very useful.

I use an Excel file for invoices (a separate file for each month). I designed an invoice template, and insert it for each invoice (two mouse clicks). I insert the client’s address (again from a separate Excel file containing the addresses of all my clients), date and all other relevant information, and the template calculates the subtotal, VAT and total amount automatically, based on the rate and word/hour count I inserted. I then convert the invoice to pdf, and e-mail it to the client.

I never looked into specialized accounting software, because I find this method very quick and efficient. I’m sure I could streamline the process further, but who has the time to experiment with new software, unless absolutely necessary?:)

BW,
Elizabeth


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Stanislaw Kulikowski  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 03:41
English to Polish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
I use Excell, too Dec 2, 2005

for recording my jobs. It does all the calculations, totals, VAT, etc. Somehow I don't like the "cell" approach to invoices. Besides, I have regular clients that I invoice at the end of the month - for many jobs and I hoped that well-structured Access file/template would total jobs monthly. I never tried pdf'ing it, though. I will have to give it a second thought and take a closer look at your approach.
Thanks for the info.

Stan


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Eddy Michaels
Spain
Local time: 03:41
Catalan to English
Trying to create an ACCESS 2007 Dbase May 30, 2008

Hi.
I have read the comments here and after looking at various ready made packages on offer for billing, it seems the best bet in the long run will be to get my head around Access. The problem is, it's tough to get into it's logic, and even though I have prepared the different fields I want to use and different tables etc., I can't create the project for each translation job, especially where there are multiple items on one bill. It would be great for someone here to provide a perfected dbase that we could use as a template for translators / translating companies and not have to splash out a fortune on other software.
Thanks (in the hope!)
Eddy


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Antoní­n Otáhal
Local time: 03:41
Member (2005)
English to Czech
+ ...
Wanna have your pie or eat it? May 30, 2008

I mean, if you want to have something ready-made, it need not be an MS Access database and you can use one of numerous systems on the market. The main advantage of MS Access is that you can (and should) create a database (or several mutually interconnected databases) up to your needs.

"Running Microsoft Access 2000" by John Viescas is a very good book with a CD and example databases to lead you through all necessary steps. It may have been updated to newer versions of MS Access, but from 2000 to 2003 the differences are more or less negligible.

However, if you do not like experimenting, learning new things and doing some programming, it is not a way to go.

Antonin


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Does anyone use Access+Word for invoicing?

Advanced search






Protemos translation business management system
Create your account in minutes, and start working! 3-month trial for agencies, and free for freelancers!

The system lets you keep client/vendor database, with contacts and rates, manage projects and assign jobs to vendors, issue invoices, track payments, store and manage project files, generate business reports on turnover profit per client/manager etc.

More info »
PerfectIt consistency checker
Faster Checking, Greater Accuracy

PerfectIt helps deliver error-free documents. It improves consistency, ensures quality and helps to enforce style guides. It’s a powerful tool for pro users, and comes with the assurance of a 30-day money back guarantee.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search