Outlook attachments
Thread poster: Tina Colquhoun

Tina Colquhoun  Identity Verified
Local time: 08:16
Danish to English
+ ...
Apr 24, 2007

I was wondering...

When you attach a document to an e-mail in Outlook, are you attaching a shortcut to the document or are you 'uploading' the document, i.e. in effect copying it?

Tina


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afiori6
Local time: 04:16
English to Spanish
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Outlook Attachments Apr 24, 2007

Hi Tina,

Yes you are correct in your thinking.

What you are doing when you attach a document is creating a copy of it.

So all those emails you have in your sent items with attachements are copies of files. They are however stored in a special Outlook file on your harddrive.

If you need a more IT geek response let me know

Regards
Afiori


[Edited at 2007-04-24 18:27]

[Edited at 2007-04-24 18:27]


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ViktoriaG  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 03:16
English to French
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Yes, you attach the actual document Apr 24, 2007

In fact, you attach a copy of the document. All of its parameters are inherited. This goes for all properties, for example, the author and editing times (whoever you send it to can "spy" on you by looking at document properties). Password protection is also inherited.

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PAS  Identity Verified
Local time: 09:16
English to Polish
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Copy Apr 24, 2007

You are copying the document into the Outlook file.
If you delete the original file from the hard drive, the file will still be "sitting" in the Outlook file (Outlook.pst).

I actually managed to recover an older version of a file I needed, having overwritten the old version while working on it. The old file was sitting in the e-mail I sent out a few days earlier.

HTH
Pawel Skalinski


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Tina Colquhoun  Identity Verified
Local time: 08:16
Danish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks Apr 24, 2007

Thanks, I've learnt something today.

So many times I've attached a finished translation to the delivery e-mail and thought 'Oh! I've just forgotten to check for double spacing...' or something and gone back to the original file on my desktop, corrected/changed that and not been sure about whether the changes would then be contained in the attachment (which they would have been if the shortcut answer had been right). I always thought I was being pernickety by clearing the attachment and then 'uploading' it again. I see that I was not.

I wonder now whether I really did it every time...as I was leaning towards the 'shortcut' explanation.

Thanks again!

Tina

[Edited at 2007-04-24 19:24]


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Henrik Pipoyan  Identity Verified
Local time: 11:16
Member (2004)
English to Armenian
Hi Tina Apr 24, 2007

It's the copy of the file, as my colleagues stated above. Please note, however, that this copy becomes an independent file ONLY after you send the message, in other words, only after the message moves to the Sent Items folder. If you delete the original file before sending the message, you'll lose both files; and if you make a change in the attachment and save it before sending the message, the change will be saved in the original file as well.

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Tina Colquhoun  Identity Verified
Local time: 08:16
Danish to English
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TOPIC STARTER
Thanks again Apr 24, 2007

What I want to know is - what happens if I wrote the e-mail, uploaded the attachment, made changes IN THE ORIGINAL and then sent the e-mail and its attachment?

You are in effect saying that the file is ONE file until it is sent. Is that right? So that would mean that you could make changes in either and both (both still being one) would be updated as long as you hadn't sent anything yet.

Tina


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Henrik Pipoyan  Identity Verified
Local time: 11:16
Member (2004)
English to Armenian
You are right Apr 24, 2007

This is one file until you have sent it. So if you have made changes in the original before sending the message, all the changes were saved in the attachment as well.

You can try it. Just create a file typing a single word in it and attach it to a message. Then re-open the original and add another word. After you save and close the file, you can open the attachment and see that the word was added in the attachment too.

Henry


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Henrik Pipoyan  Identity Verified
Local time: 11:16
Member (2004)
English to Armenian
Sorry I was wrong Apr 24, 2007

I just checked it. In fact it becomes an independent file after you press the "Send" button, i.e., after you send it to the Outbox. As long as the message is open and you haven't pressed the "Send" button, it's one file.

Henry


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Tina Colquhoun  Identity Verified
Local time: 08:16
Danish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Well, almost the same thing... Apr 24, 2007

Thanks for your thorough investigation!

Tina


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