Poll: Do you build your own glossaries?
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff
ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 12:11
SITE STAFF
Mar 6, 2009

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "Do you build your own glossaries?".

This poll was originally submitted by Camille Abou Jamra

View the poll here

A forum topic will appear each time a new poll is run. For more information, see: http://proz.com/topic/33629


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Oleg Osipov  Identity Verified
Russian Federation
Local time: 22:11
English to Russian
+ ...
I... Mar 6, 2009

I don't have to, in principle. It depends on a number of factors, particular to target audience.
Hand-made translation with a style-taylored features what really matters, as I see it, depending on a particular objective.


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xxxAWa
Local time: 21:11
English to German
+ ...
Certainly Mar 6, 2009

When working on a text for a client I always have a wordlist for that client to which I add new terms, if necessary with an explanation, for future reference. After all I want the clients to come back and would be embarrassed if I would have to ask the same questions about specific terminology again and again because, since last working for them, I might have forgotten the term they use in that context.

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Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 21:11
Member (2003)
Danish to English
+ ...
Yes - in Wordfast Mar 6, 2009

I started building up lists of client-specific terminology in Multiterm, and then added things that come up regularly like public authorities, laws and so on. It saves me a lot of searching. Then I even added names of countries, months and days of the week!

Multiterm inserts them into the text, correctly spelled, and saves me correcting Demnark, COtober, Ewdesnday and dozens of other typos... I've been trying to learn to type accurately for over 40 years!

Since Multiterm currently refuses to be edited (there is some Java incompatibility in the version I use, and the update is still not working 100% with TagEditor and Workbench on my setup...)
... So I have started using Wordfast, and transferring or retyping my glossaries. It is so much less complicated, and items can still be added immediately as you translate.

As time permits, I am working on some of the real terminology lists from my Terminology scrapbag too. It's partly a pay-off from KudoZ - I note down other people's suggestions when they look suitably reliable (I do check). I used to write them into my dictionaries, but they are more easily accessible in a searchable on-line glossary.

I have one glossary for each language pair, then it is no problem if subject areas overlap - it's all there.

I can't do without them!


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Yaotl Altan  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 14:11
Member (2006)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Yes Mar 6, 2009

In Excel, in spanish, English, French, German and Italian. It's mainly in English and Spanish and has 6321 entries.

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María José Domínguez Camba  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 21:11
English to Spanish
+ ...
other Mar 6, 2009

Sort of "yes". I sometimes build "dictionaries" in Transit, but never independent files in Excel, like some customers send. Managing too many files is just confusing. Sometimes i even align the glossaries i receive, it saves time.

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John Cutler  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 21:11
Spanish to English
+ ...
Sometimes Mar 6, 2009

If I think I'm going to deal with the subject again or if the document is long, I do make a glossary. In cases like those, glossaries are invaluable.

If I get what I believe will be a one-off document, I may jot a few things down, but not much more. A case in point would be a translation I did a couple of years ago. It was about the history of milk usage in Spain. It was actually more interesting than it sounds but hardly a "hot" topic that will come up again any time soon.


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Andrew Levine  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 15:11
Member (2007)
French to English
+ ...
Yes, absolutely Mar 6, 2009

I do a lot of similar, repetitive texts in SDLX, and Termbase glossaries are essential. It's an enormous time saver to be able to just hit Ctrl+1 instead of typing out "characterized in that" twenty times in each patent.

[Edited at 2009-03-06 20:02 GMT]


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amky
Saudi Arabia
Local time: 22:11
English to Arabic
+ ...
Yes, I do most of the time Mar 6, 2009

Andrew Levine wrote:

I do a lot of similar, repetitive texts in SDLX, and Termbase glossaries are essential. It's an enormous time saver to be able to just hit Ctrl+1 instead of typing out "characterized in that" twenty times in each patent.

[Edited at 2009-03-06 20:02 GMT]


It is a good reference to have a systemic built Glossary of your own, it helps a lot.


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Alice Bootman  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 13:11
Member (2008)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Sometimes Mar 6, 2009

If I'm working on a series of documents from one client, having a glossary for that client saves a lot of time instead of having to go back and look at what I did before. I don't always use a glossary though. It depends on the job.

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R-i-c-h-a-r-d  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 16:11
Member (2006)
Portuguese to English
+ ...
IF / AND / OR anyone? Mar 7, 2009

I have my own custom built Microsoft Access database which gets added to every time I start a new translation, without exception.

I like being able to open it whenever I choose and add new terminology that I may have seen on the Internet or 'on the road', so to speak. This data may be directly related or completely unrelated to the current translation project, but by using simple check boxes and queries, data can be filtered very easily. It works well.

I've been working for many years with Access and SQL server and queries, even on-line MySQL data, so it feels perfectly natural and logical to me.


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Wil Hardman  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:11
Spanish to English
+ ...
No- but it's on my to do list! Mar 7, 2009

I have years of terminology that I've collected on paper, but somehow I never get round to making any glossaries. I know they would be useful and time-saving, but I suppose I like to spend any free time I have away from the computer...

Let's be honest, glossary building is boring!


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Williamson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:11
Flemish to English
+ ...
Yes Mar 7, 2009

I have made a few with Access. A glossary of 8000 terms related to construction (French - Dutch) as well as some which I posted here (which is why I got about 30000 browniz).

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Vito Smolej
Germany
Local time: 21:11
Member (2004)
English to Slovenian
+ ...
I would be floating in a boat with a paddle ... Mar 7, 2009

... if I did not do it - for my target fields (HazMat, PIL/SPC, mechanical engineering, IT, EuroLex). It helps a lot to streamline the terminology too.

It's more or less all in MultiTerm and I have a special parallel-running activity of collecting useful bi/polylingual Material.

I voted sometimes, because I am selective.

Regards

Vito


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Marlene Blanshay  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 15:11
Member (2009)
French to English
+ ...
yes Mar 7, 2009

but not rigorously....
but i do have a glossary with some tech, IT and related phrases that I was unfamiliar with. I have to remember to update it more frequently though.


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