Poll: Do you publish your Terms and Conditions on your website?
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff

ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 12:48
SITE STAFF
Mar 15, 2011

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "Do you publish your Terms and Conditions on your website?".

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Sophie Dzhygir  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 21:48
Member (2007)
German to French
+ ...
Other Mar 15, 2011

I don't have Terms and Conditions icon_razz.gif

 

patriciacharnet  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:48
English to French
+ ...
yes Mar 15, 2011

that way it's legally binding (I hope) icon_smile.gif

 

Adnan Özdemir  Identity Verified
Turkey
Local time: 22:48
Member (2007)
German to Turkish
+ ...
No Mar 15, 2011

I don't need it. My terms and conditions are different for different countries and outsourcers icon_biggrin.gif



Anadolu'dan selamlar
Saludos desde Anatolia


 

Thayenga  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 21:48
Member (2009)
English to German
+ ...
No Mar 15, 2011

Adnan Özdemir wrote:



I don't need it. My terms and conditions are different for different countries and outsourcers icon_biggrin.gif



Anadolu'dan selamlar
Saludos desde Anatolia


My terms and conditions vary, depending on the client, the project etc.

icon_smile.gif


 

Theo Bernards  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 21:48
English to Dutch
+ ...
Yes, I do. Mar 15, 2011

I think it is important to give your customers and prospects an idea of what's in store for them when they do business with you. Also, when I buy something (even in the supermarket), I have to live with the terms and conditions of the seller: they decide what they sell to whom, when and at what price. Analog to that, I decide what I sell to whom, when and at what rate and under which conditions.

In a tongue in cheek approach I refer to my T&C as "the small print" and I have indeed used a smaller font for them. But they are not extensive and certainly not difficult to understand.


 

John Cutler  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 21:48
Spanish to English
+ ...
Other Mar 15, 2011

I think it's something that's best discussed personally or, if nothing else, over the phone, or put into writing as part of the initial negotiation phase.

Too many terms and conditions right up front can sound off-putting and demanding (even if perfectly reasonable).


 

neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 21:48
Spanish to English
+ ...
I dont have a website Mar 15, 2011

... yet. Too busy.
Anyway, I wouldn't call them "terms and conditions", which I agree sounds too mistrustful, defensive, overly businesslike/legalistic and off-putting. Instead, I have what I call "collaboration guidelines", which include my base rates for orientation purposes, and the basic conditions that I would like to see in my working relation with clients.
My 3 main points, not necessarily in order, are
1: undefined acronyms will not be translated or any time wasted on them. The person who used it presumably knew what it was so they can tell me or go whistle. This saves me oodles of time and serves as a reminder to clients working in jargonized frameworks;)
2: basic rates apply to normal formats , i. e. Word-compatible, easily manageable and unprotected, with the odious "Track changes" option deactivated; other formats (ODF, etc) require more time to process or a higher rate.
3: graphic insertions or other imported objects can slow down or otherwise hinder swift translation of text and should also be avoided.


 

Steven Capsuto  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 15:48
Member (2004)
Spanish to English
+ ...
No website Mar 15, 2011

I indicate my fees and payment terms during my initial e-mail exchange with a potential client. If they respond to that message, I know that they've seen them.

If they then ask me to sign an agreement with significantly different terms (an issue that has arisen only with agencies, never direct clients), I ask for a change to their agreement. Smaller agencies are generally willing to make the change if it's reasonable. Larger corporate agencies often are not (in which case I don't work with them).

[Edited at 2011-03-15 12:12 GMT]


 

Alexey Ivanov  Identity Verified
Russian Federation
Local time: 22:48
English to Russian
I do, but... Mar 15, 2011

I doubt anybody reads them.

 

José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 16:48
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Yes, but generally Mar 15, 2011

I give a general idea on what drives my pricing policy, being specific about my non-disclosure policy.

Considering that most clients have been trained by our fellow translators to have the upper hand, there is not so much to gain by feebly trying to impose our terms and conditions.

What amazes me is that half of the translators responding here so far said that they don't have a web site.


 

Steven Capsuto  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 15:48
Member (2004)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Website Mar 15, 2011

José Henrique Lamensdorf wrote:

What amazes me is that half of the translators responding here so far said that they don't have a web site.


I started to design my own website, and then realized I already had more work coming in than I could accept. It didn't seem worth the time and expense to put one up. I publicize my services through other means (largely by proactively reaching out to desirable potential clients).


 

Alison Sabedoria  Identity Verified
France
Member (2009)
French to English
+ ...
No... Mar 15, 2011

...but in my next website revision (long overdue!) I might just mention that there's a document I can send if anyone would like to see it.

I usually send one variant or another early in negotiations and take a reply as acceptance, but I've never had to lean on that yet. I'm tempted to follow Neil's example and add a punitive clause about abbreviations and acronyms. I had a trade magazine full of the things last week (I think only one got away).

Tinkering with the website is a bit of fun I allow myself between jobs. Slow progress maybe, but I have learned so much!

Alison

[Edited at 2011-03-15 18:54 GMT]


 

Muriel Vasconcellos  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 12:48
Member (2003)
Spanish to English
+ ...
No, but it's a good idea Mar 16, 2011

That way, people are forewarned. There are a few pesky issues, similar to the ones that Neil mentioned, that I should probably make clear up front. It would save everyone's time. And I could copy them into my responses to job queries that I turn down - as boilerplate, so people wouldn't try to negotiate when I don't want to.

BTW, I don't agree with Neil about abbreviations. I always find out what they mean and then translate them if it is appropriate to do so. That would be a good topic for a poll.


 


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