Poll: Are you working in the localization industry?
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff

ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 00:41
SITE STAFF
Nov 8, 2011

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "Are you working in the localization industry?".

This poll was originally submitted by Carla Oddi. View the poll results »



 

Simon Bruni  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:41
Member (2009)
Spanish to English
Aren't all translators? Nov 8, 2011

I don't get the question. What translation isn't a form of localisation?

 

neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 09:41
Spanish to English
+ ...
Ditto Nov 8, 2011

Simon Bruni wrote:

I don't get the question. What translation isn't a form of localisation?


Me neither. I see "localization" as one offshoot of the translation industry, not an industry per se.


 

Mary Worby  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:41
Member
German to English
+ ...
Software localisation Nov 8, 2011

I'd interpreted it as the software localisation industry (sector?).

 

Carla Oddi  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 09:41
Member (2010)
German to Italian
+ ...
Localisation industry sector Nov 8, 2011

It has to be interpreted as teh software localisation industry sector.

Language localisation[nb 1] (from Latin locus (place) and the English term locale, "a place where something happens or is set")[1] is the second phase of a larger process of product translation and cultural adaptation (for specific countries, regions, or groups) to account for differences in distinct markets, a process known as internationalisation and localisation.

Language localisation is not merely a translation activity, because it involves a comprehensive study of the target culture in order to correctly adapt the product to local needs. Localisation is sometimes referred to by the numeronym L10N (as in: "L", followed by ten more letters, and then "N").

The localisation process is most generally related to the cultural adaptation and translation of software, video games, and websites, and less frequently to any written translation (which may also involve cultural adaptation processes). Localisation can be done for regions or countries where people speak different languages, or where the same language is spoken: for instance, different dialects of Spanish, with different idioms, are spoken in Spain than are spoken in Latin America; likewise, word choices and idioms vary among countries where English is the official language (e.g., in the United States, the United Kingdom, and the Philippines). The project involves several teams. The translator works with the teams before and after the translation work.

I agree with you that every translation is also an adaptation to the target country/culture, in this sense every translation is also a localisation but I hope you can now better understand my question.

Carla


 

xxxInterlangue
Angola
Local time: 09:41
English to French
+ ...
So did I Nov 8, 2011

Mary Worby wrote:

I'd interpreted it as the software localisation industry (sector?).


 

neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 09:41
Spanish to English
+ ...
Definitions Nov 8, 2011

Carla Oddi wrote:

Language localisation is not merely a translation activity, because it involves a comprehensive study of the target culture in order to correctly adapt the product to local needs. ...

Carla


My own definition (and of others too, I imagine) of "translation" implicitly includes knowledge (preferrably as near-native level as possible, if not native per se) of the target culture in order to correctly adapt the translated text to local needs, nuance and purpose.






[Edited at 2011-11-08 11:24 GMT]


 

patriciacharnet  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:41
English to French
+ ...
yes Nov 8, 2011

so if I understand it right it's translating for specific markets i.e. France and not international French for customers of all backgrounds

difficult to answer in French because we do have localisation with different dialects for market inquiries, market surveys, where French dialects do differ a lot i.e. Belgian French from French from France and Québec French.

However for more neutral products, we all adhere to international standard French.

So, on that basis, if I understand the question well, I do as most of my work specifically target France on average by a little bit over 50% but I do have a strong clientele asking for international French.

I hope I did get it righticon_smile.gif

[Edited at 2011-11-08 12:14 GMT]

[Edited at 2011-11-08 12:15 GMT]


 


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