Pages in topic:   [1 2] >
Poll: How often do you cancel plans with family or friends to work?
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff
ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 16:17
SITE STAFF
Jun 23, 2012

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "How often do you cancel plans with family or friends to work?".

This poll was originally submitted by Gwen Jones. View the poll results »



Direct link Reply with quote
 

Mary Worby  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:17
Member
German to English
+ ...
Never Jun 23, 2012

If I have made firm plans, then I don't cancel them. If that means turning down work, so be it!

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Teresa Borges
Portugal
Local time: 00:17
Member (2007)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
A few times Jun 23, 2012

If we're talking about going to the cinema or shopping or something trivial like that I might cancel or postpone it for a few hours, but never about more "serious" stuff like medical appointments, travel, holidays, marriages, anniversaries...

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Claire Cox
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:17
French to English
+ ...
Other - once in a blue moon Jun 23, 2012

I wouldn't say never, because I can think of the odd occasion over the years when I've had to cancel something because work has taken me longer than I've thought, or other emergencies have cropped up which have meant I wouldn't be able to finish work on time unless I cancelled a social event. Much less than a few times a year, though, as I would think it rude to let friends down once I'd agreed to something unless I really had to. And I certainly wouldn't change my plans just to accept new work, even for a very well paid or lucrative and fascinating job!

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Paula Hernández
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:17
English to Spanish
+ ...
Sometimes Jun 23, 2012

But mostly because the plan didn't really appeal to me... and I can use work as an excuse!

Direct link Reply with quote
 

neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 01:17
Spanish to English
+ ...
Other Jun 23, 2012

In principle I don't like making plans, the best laid of which "go oft awry". However, if I do have a date or commitment for a social occasion with friends or family I try to keep it. Nevertheless, my people know that as a freelancer I might suddenly get an "urgent" job coming in from clients and may have to cancel any prior social arrangements, although I usually manage to balance both ends. Anyway, it is not usually a case of cancelling; when I am invited somewhere my response is invariably "I'll try to come, but it depends on my workload". They understand and accept this.

For example, I have been meaning to go and see my friend's band playing for the past couple of months, but they always play late at night and usually some distance away, so I am finding it a struggle. Last night was a friend's birthday and I was invited to a party in town, but again by the time it got to almost midnight the 40-minute trip to the city was less apealling. I'll buy her lunch the next time we meet to make up for it.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 01:17
Spanish to English
+ ...
The perfect get-out Jun 23, 2012

Paula Hernández wrote:

But mostly because the plan didn't really appeal to me... and I can use work as an excuse!


This is often my case too!


Direct link Reply with quote
 

neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 01:17
Spanish to English
+ ...
Circumstances Jun 23, 2012

Teresa Borges wrote:

If we're talking about going to the cinema or shopping or something trivial like that I might cancel or postpone it for a few hours, but never about more "serious" stuff like medical appointments, travel, holidays, marriages, anniversaries...


Regarding medical appointments, I normally go to mine religiously, but on the last 2 occasions I more or less knew that I was likely to sit in the waiting room for up to several hours before being told that everything was OK and simply to continue the treatment and come back in 3 or 6 months. I happened to be busy the first time, so I called and explained to the receptionist and asked if the doctor could confirm my theory by phone; they agreed, and on the second occasion they just contacted me by phone again and said I didn't need to appear in person. This way, it lightens their workload too and lets me get on with my job without losing half a day's translation time.

As for holidays, I wouldn't normally cancel, but I do tend to take my laptop with me and am not averse to doing the odd bit of translation when on holiday.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

John Cutler  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 01:17
Spanish to English
+ ...
Never Jun 23, 2012

Never because I always tell my wife, "Don't make any plans for the weekend until 6 pm on Friday. Then I'll be able to tell you for certain whether I'm busy or not."

She finds that a bit exasperating because she loves filling in her desktop calendar weeks in advance. I used to be more like that but after so many years of translating I've turned into a "here and now, live in the moment" kind of person.

Plans we may have during the week are not much of a problem because I can always find a way to combine work and some other activity.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Mario Chavez  Identity Verified
Local time: 19:17
English to Spanish
+ ...
Other, of course Jun 23, 2012

Paula Hernández wrote:

But mostly because the plan didn't really appeal to me... and I can use work as an excuse!


Famous last words, Paula

In my case, I don't have local friends or family, so I get to work all I want. Groan...


Direct link Reply with quote
 

E. Novesky  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 19:17
Member (2009)
Spanish to English
this is why I am a freelancer Jun 23, 2012

I said other.
The whole reason I quit my office job to jump into the freelance world was so that I could spend as much time as possible at home with my husband (retired) and our young son, so I try not to cancel things with them as a general rule.
That said, I have been seen at karate class, beside the soccer field or tennis court, working away on my laptop to meet a deadline with one eye, and watching my boy with the other. And I am often home with a son pleading "Mommy please play with me!" when I just can't, but at least I am still present with him, and when I'm done, don't have to get in the car, go pick him up from care, drive home, only for it to be too late to spend time with him anyway (which is what it was like when I worked in an office). So, although there are rare occasions when all else must wait until I finish my work, I try not to let my work get too much in the way of my life


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Robert Forstag  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 19:17
Member (2003)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Other (rarely) [The importance of setting limits] Jun 23, 2012

In general, I am no longer available "24/7" to receive requests, as I feel that, spending something like 80% of my waking hours in front of my computer, I need the other 20% to myself, free even from the burden of carrying a cell phone and receiving and responding to messages (most of which will not be urgent--or even especially important--in any case).

This is an arrangement that has worked well for me, as my regular clients (and even most new potential clients I might be interested in working with) are typically willing to wait up to 10 hours for me to get back to them.

As for cattle calls for urgent jobs offering low rates, I can easily dispense with these, as they are of no interest to me.

I consider being in a position of having to cancel plans, squeeze in a project when I've already worked a number of consecutive full days, stay up late, etc. a great inconvenience, and any work I take on under such circumstances will have to pay a rate that makes it worth my while.

[Edited at 2012-06-23 16:29 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxInterlangue
Angola
Local time: 01:17
English to French
+ ...
Never Jun 23, 2012

Once upon a time, I was raising my son on my own and, when he became an adolescent, I decided he had a right to grow up without having his Mum on his back all the time, worrying and wondering about his whereabouts, etc.
We discussed the matter and I decided I would accept more translation work, even during week-ends, etc., which he gladly accepted, despite the drawbacks of not having someone at hand for any possible whim.
He learned to plan things and I learned not to be intrusive. Our relation evolved wonderfully, as the (little) time we spent together was really spent together, communicating (extensively) about our (separate) lives among others. He is a well balanced adult now, and we both enjoy our separate lives as well as the moments we share.

(Most of my) friends and family do not live around the corner and I am usually the most flexible of the bunch to accommodate everyone else’s planning.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

njweatherdon
Canada
Member (2011)
French to English
+ ...
what kind of plans? Jun 23, 2012

I often make plans along the lines of: if I accomplish a certain amount of progress by a particular time or day, then let's go for coffee or go out and do stuff. I often break those plans, but I never really quite made them.

I sometimes make plans that are more like: How about 2 or more of us travel long distances to meet up for a significant event. I never break these plans, but sometimes have to cut things short.

Then again, I'm on break for a decent portion of the year, so the balance works out nicely for me.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Renée Lizotte  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 01:17
French to English
+ ...
Oh so true, but sometimes easier said than done Jun 23, 2012

Robert Forstag wrote:

In general, I am no longer available "24/7" to receive requests, as I feel that, spending something like 80% of my waking hours in front of my computer, I need the other 20% to myself, free even from the burden of carrying a cell phone and receiving and responding to messages (most of which will not be urgent--or even especially important--in any case).

I consider being in a position of having to cancel plans, squeeze in a project when I've already worked a number of consecutive full days, stay up late, etc. a great inconvenience, and any work I take on under such circumstances will have to pay a rate that makes it worth my while.



Very good point, Robert. I think it ultimately boils down to setting limits that work and sticking to them. It's certainly a challenge at times, especially when you have a mortgage to pay or kids to feed and clothe. However, I've found that the alternative--allowing work to take precedence over everything else--leads to becoming drained and burned out very quickly. IMHO, life is too short and time is too precious to make a habit of "selling" my quality downtime.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pages in topic:   [1 2] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:

Moderator(s) of this forum
Jared Tabor[Call to this topic]

You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Poll: How often do you cancel plans with family or friends to work?

Advanced search






PerfectIt consistency checker
Faster Checking, Greater Accuracy

PerfectIt helps deliver error-free documents. It improves consistency, ensures quality and helps to enforce style guides. It’s a powerful tool for pro users, and comes with the assurance of a 30-day money back guarantee.

More info »
memoQ translator pro
Kilgray's memoQ is the world's fastest developing integrated localization & translation environment rendering you more productive and efficient.

With our advanced file filters, unlimited language and advanced file support, memoQ translator pro has been designed for translators and reviewers who work on their own, with other translators or in team-based translation projects.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search