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Poll: If you have a 'C' language, do you find that you use it for work...
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff
ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 07:16
SITE STAFF
Apr 11, 2013

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "If you have a 'C' language, do you find that you use it for work...".

This poll was originally submitted by Stephanie Mitchel. View the poll results »



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Susanna Martoni  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 16:16
Member (2009)
Spanish to Italian
+ ...
Other Apr 11, 2013

I love my C language (my third language) but I cannot use it as a translation language for my jobs.
A pity, I know. Maybe in the future, and after an intensive translation course based on it.

(Hoping to have well understood this poll and to have given an understandable answer ...)


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Diana Coada  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:16
Portuguese to English
+ ...
Other Apr 11, 2013

I don't use it for work. I will only start using it once I get my Masters degree

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James A. Walsh
Spain
Local time: 16:16
Member
Spanish to English
+ ...
"C Language"? Apr 11, 2013

My background is IT, so I understood "C Language" to mean this:

From Babylon English dictionary:

"C language
A general-purpose, high-level, structured computer programming language. Note: C-language was originally designed for and implemented on the UNIX operating system."

****************
If you meant "3rd Language", why didn't you say "3rd Language"?!

I do have a third language, coincidentally (Irish), but don't use it very often...


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Fang Huang  Identity Verified
Switzerland
Local time: 16:16
English to Chinese
C language? Apr 11, 2013

Yes I thought it was about the computer language too that's why I voted for the option with the question mark...

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Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 16:16
Member (2003)
Danish to English
+ ...
How I understood the definition Apr 11, 2013

Explained here for interpreters

http://aiic.net/page/4004/working-languages/lang/1

Or shortly here:
http://french.about.com/cs/translation/a/introduction_2.htm

C language - Working language
Translators and interpreters may have one or more C languages - those which they understand well enough to translate or interpret from but not to.

____________________________________

I do use two other languages for work, but choose not to advertise the fact much on this site, because I would be offered too many jobs that are too specialised.

'Native level' is also a very elastic term - I do NOT understand them at the level of professional, trained linguists in those languages, but I can probably understand a newspaper or a website or many other texts written for the general public as well as many natives...

I used to be a lot better at a couple of other languages, and can still read them when I concentrate or have seen the text before, but they have dropped below any level I could use professionally.


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Muriel Vasconcellos  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 07:16
Member (2003)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Other Apr 11, 2013

I don't have a C language; just two B languages and my native language (English).

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José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 13:16
English to Portuguese
+ ...
It depends on the classification system Apr 11, 2013

One system would constrain each letter to one language only. My case would be:
A = PT-BR (truly native) - working source/target
B = EN-US (native speakers think I'm one of them) - working source/target
C = ES (learned from practice only, speak fluently, can't write) - not for translation
D = IT (studied 4 years long ago, still speak) - not for translation
E = FR (studied 3 years long ago, still speak) - not for translation
F = PL (heard it spoken at home for 25 years, never learned) - only for basic survival

(Note: Now and then I use the 'not for translation' languages for DTP or to time spot video subtitles. No problem so far.)


The other system would comprise only three levels:
A = PT + EN (working languages for translation and interpreting)
B = ES + IT + FR (for reference, occasional communication, personal use)
C = PL (only when no other language will work)


Considering the question, some may view my second approach as 'silly'. It's not! More than twice I had to negotiate EN-PT translation projects in PL with significant help from machine translation. In one case, when MT told me the Polish PM had 180 "towels" (sic!) for me to translate, we switched our communication to French.

I am completely unable to understand/communicate in any other language.


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B. D. Laux  Identity Verified
Local time: 16:16
Member (2009)
German to Norwegian
+ ...
What is a C language? Apr 11, 2013

Now as I know it, I would say "yes, sometimes". I have also studied French, and I sometimes compare with the French translation if it is accessible. The same goes for English, I guess.

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Yetta J Bogarde  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 16:16
Member (2012)
English to Danish
+ ...
What's a C language? Apr 11, 2013

I have studied German and French and also worked in both Germany and France, so I could translate from those 2 languages, if necessary.
However, I prefer to leave that to the translators who offer German and French professionally.
.


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Stephanie Mitchel  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 10:16
French to English
'C' what I mean? Apr 11, 2013

Thanks for taking the time to discuss my poll. Sorry I wasn't awake to clarify!

As Christine and José kindly explained, your 'C' language is any language you can speak and/or write with a degree of fluency, but not the mastery that's required for active use (i.e. translating or interpreting into).

Some people will improve their C language in the course of their career to a point where it can be considered a second B language. I would love to have the time to improve my C (German), but I doubt very much I'll ever be able to translate into it, since the further I am from school the harder it is to use even passively.

Stephanie


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ventnai  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 16:16
Member
German to English
+ ...
French Apr 11, 2013

I would say French is my C language. I have proofread French to English translations but would never translate from French. I sometimes look at French translations of difficult terms to see if it would help.

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Raffaela Ciampa
Italy
Local time: 16:16
Italian to English
+ ...
FRENCH Apr 11, 2013

Funny enough, French is the C language for most of us here!

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Eva María Ruiz
Spain
Local time: 16:16
English to Spanish
+ ...
Really surprised Apr 11, 2013

Dear all:
I am really surprised that the most voted option has been "What is a language C?" Everybody knows that the language C is the second foreign language you learn in a Translation degree. Language B is one's first foreign language and language A is the native one.

Best regards,
Eva


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EvaVer  Identity Verified
Local time: 16:16
Member (2012)
Czech to English
+ ...
As I understand it, Apr 11, 2013

i.e., a "passive" language, I have two of them and I mostly use the one that I know less (Romanian), which I didn't expect, but I hardly ever use Bulgarian, which I expected I would. The definition of "second foreign language" would mean English in my case, which has become my prevailing working laguage. But I wouldn't define English as my "C language", I would even consider the definition offensive. So yes, I consider myself as having two "B" languages, if you want to call it that.

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