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Poll: Do you store your work-related data in the cloud?
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff

ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 00:20
SITE STAFF
Apr 18, 2013

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "Do you store your work-related data in the cloud?".

This poll was originally submitted by CatherineDC. View the poll results »



 

Emin Arı  Identity Verified
Turkey
Local time: 10:20
Member
English to Turkish
+ ...
e-mail account is nothing but another form of a cloud repository Apr 18, 2013

During these days e-mail providers are very generous for the size of account. A simple but effective way is to send your partial backups to yourself through e-mail. As long as you reach from everywhere, it is a cloud.

Also saving sending e-mails do the same trick.

For bigger bites, a flash memory is fine for me.


 

Tuncay Kurt  Identity Verified
Turkey
Member (2011)
English to Turkish
+ ...
Sure Apr 18, 2013

Dropbox: perfect for this

 

Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 09:20
Member (2003)
Danish to English
+ ...
Some of my clients are not happy with it Apr 18, 2013

Some of my best clients are not happy with it, so no, and I'm not planning to use it.

Apart from that, I run on the 'if it ain't broke, don't fix it' principle.

My system works fine without the cloud, and at my age that is areason for keeping it going and not causing trouble.

My IT man is setting up a new computer and I'm dreading transferring everything just to that, tho' it will probably work out. The idea of things floating around in cyberspace at the mercy of hotspots when I am travelling terrifies me too.


 

Susanna Martoni  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 09:20
Member (2009)
Spanish to Italian
+ ...
No Apr 18, 2013

but since I have Dropbox, I think I will follow Tunkay's advice. At least, I will try.

Thank you!


 

Michael Harris  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 09:20
Member (2006)
German to English
No Apr 18, 2013

mainly because of security issues. I do not know what is happening with the info and I just generally do not trust such things, although they probably are a useful tool??

 

Julian Holmes  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 16:20
Member (2011)
Japanese to English
No Apr 18, 2013

Like Michael, security would be an issue with almost all of my customers since I translate technical stuff. Some customers even insist that I erase their work from my hard disk and other storage media immediatley after I deliver. Very cloak and dagger. icon_eek.gif
And, sometimes, I have been required to sign not one but two NDAs for projects that are still under development.

Mind you, in most cases, the source text I am translating is already in the public domain and hence not worth hacking, and, by virtue of my being hooked up to the Internet 24/7, my computer is a sitting duck if somebody was really intent on peeping inside it. So, the issue of "security" does become a little tenuous.

Small edits

[Edited at 2013-04-18 23:48 GMT]


 

neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 09:20
Spanish to English
+ ...
Ditto Apr 18, 2013

Christine Andersen wrote:

Some of my best clients are not happy with it, so no, and I'm not planning to use it.

Apart from that, I run on the 'if it ain't broke, don't fix it' principle.

My system works fine without the cloud, and at my age that is areason for keeping it going and not causing trouble.

My IT man is setting up a new computer and I'm dreading transferring everything just to that, tho' it will probably work out. The idea of things floating around in cyberspace at the mercy of hotspots when I am travelling terrifies me too.



I see no advantages at all from my point of view as a freelancer. I can keep all my work backed up on a pen drive and I prefer not to share my TMs with all and sundry.


 

Filipa Plant dos Santos  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 08:20
Member (2011)
Portuguese to English
Exactly! Apr 18, 2013

Emin Arı wrote:

During these days e-mail providers are very generous for the size of account. A simple but effective way is to send your partial backups to yourself through e-mail. As long as you reach from everywhere, it is a cloud.

Also saving sending e-mails do the same trick.

For bigger bites, a flash memory is fine for me.



I'm with Emin here.

Sending things back to yourself is quite funny - but it works!

Philip Marlowe (fictional detective!) was always posting important documents back to himself - cheques from missing heiresses, blackmail notes from gangsters, money that he didn't want to leave in his office (in case the gangsters came looking for their blackmail notes) etc.

It worked for him!


 

Mario Chavez (X)  Identity Verified
Local time: 03:20
English to Spanish
+ ...
Cloud = Internet Apr 18, 2013

The question is deceptively simple but shows several angles of inquiry. Our colleague Emin handled it quite beautifully, with a sharp mind, because I would have said the same thing.

Let's remember that any of the cloud-related terms are just marketing fluff to describe a service residing in a portion of the WWW in the Internet. ARPANET created the first network, i.e. cloud. CompuServe (back in the early 90s) was the cloud's email king for a few years, until AOL arrived with a slick shell of a portal for all your WWW needs.

I remember using CompuServe so faithfully, two hours a day (that was the ongoing quota for most individual consumers in 1993), that I built my first “online presence” in the form of one-page HTML 1.0 with a grey background and maybe two paragraphs.

AOL saturated the market with its annoying CDs that you could find at any cash register in the country. It had its years of popularity, fame (remember You've Got Mail, the movie?) but its waning ascendancy after the Time Warner takeover was a sure sign that Case (AOL's founder) had missed the biggest boat ever.

You and your clients may object to confidentiality risks in the so-called cloud services, but you all have been using the cloud in one way or another since you opened your first e-mail account.

As for data security, I prefer to keep the bulk of my work-related files in onsite hard drives, thank you very much. All my Outlook emails reside in a local file (approaching 5 GB) on my desktop computer, but I fully understand that untold copies of the same emails reside in an indeterminate number of servers across the world.


 

Mikael Adolfsson  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 09:20
English to Swedish
+ ...
It can be useful, and there are ways to improve security Apr 18, 2013

Julian Holmes wrote:

Like Michael, security would be an issue with almost all of my customers since I translate technical stuff. Some customers even insist that I erase their work from my hard disk and other storage media immediatley after I deliver. Very cloak and dagger. icon_eek.gif
And, sometimes, I have been required to sign not one but two NDAs for projects that are still under development.

Mind you, in most cases, the source text I am translating is already in the public domain and hence not worth hacking, and, by virtue of my being hooked up to the Internet 24/7, my computer is a sitting duck if somebody was really intent on peeping inside it. So, the issue of "security" does become a little tenuous.

Small edits

[Edited at 2013-04-18 14:00 GMT]


Well, if someone would break into my office and steal every harddrive, NAS and USB-memory, it´s not good ... or if there is a fire in the office. A friend of my recently got his house flooded - and as we all know, that is not good for any electronic equipment.
So, to increase security I use a cloud service with encrypted disks. But since I am a bit paranoidicon_wink.gif, and don´t trust them, I simply use 7-zip to zip and encrypt my files with 256 bit encryption. That should at least make it rahter difficult for anyone to get access to my files, TMs and so on. And since 7-zip can pack stuff rather well, I can get more stuff into my cloud space.


 

Mario Chavez (X)  Identity Verified
Local time: 03:20
English to Spanish
+ ...
A convoluted solution Apr 18, 2013

Mikael Adolfsson wrote:

Julian Holmes wrote:

Like Michael, security would be an issue with almost all of my customers since I translate technical stuff. Some customers even insist that I erase their work from my hard disk and other storage media immediatley after I deliver. Very cloak and dagger. icon_eek.gif
And, sometimes, I have been required to sign not one but two NDAs for projects that are still under development.

Mind you, in most cases, the source text I am translating is already in the public domain and hence not worth hacking, and, by virtue of my being hooked up to the Internet 24/7, my computer is a sitting duck if somebody was really intent on peeping inside it. So, the issue of "security" does become a little tenuous.

Small edits

[Edited at 2013-04-18 14:00 GMT]


Well, if someone would break into my office and steal every harddrive, NAS and USB-memory, it´s not good ... or if there is a fire in the office. A friend of my recently got his house flooded - and as we all know, that is not good for any electronic equipment.
So, to increase security I use a cloud service with encrypted disks. But since I am a bit paranoidicon_wink.gif, and don´t trust them, I simply use 7-zip to zip and encrypt my files with 256 bit encryption. That should at least make it rahter difficult for anyone to get access to my files, TMs and so on. And since 7-zip can pack stuff rather well, I can get more stuff into my cloud space.


Mikael's solution reminds me of one adopted by a friend in Argentina. She would make CD or DVD backup copies of her project files. I told her that was a very time-consuming solution back in 2005.

Services like Mozy offer password-encrypted online backup service at cheap rates here in the USA. As for fire and flood risks in the home office, may I suggest the use of a fireproof and/or waterproof storage unit to keep the backup hard drives?

Before giving in to paranoia and insecurity, we have to do a realistic, real-life risk assessment. If I take every fire prevention precautions around my house, I don't need a fireproof safe to keep my hard drives. Same with flood or robbery risks.

As part of this risk assessment, ask yourself: How valuable, in your country's currency (not sentimental value) is your work data? Put your wost-case scenarios in writing and possible solutions to implement, along with their cost. You'll see how fast you'll come down to earth with a more realistic and less time-consuming approach.


 

Yaotl Altan  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 02:20
Member (2006)
English to Spanish
+ ...
No Apr 18, 2013

If we store our information i nthe cloud we give the power of our intellectual creation to the owner of those servers. Come on! There are no clouds up there, the only clouds are that mass of water droplets floating in the sky.

Among us....who leave the keys of the flat to X?
Hello, X, can you give me my keys, please? I want to sleep in my bed. Who delegates so many power?


 

Triston Goodwin  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 01:20
Spanish to English
+ ...
Yes Apr 18, 2013

I like dropbox since we tend to have a lot of severe weather in my area - we've actually been under a tornado and flood warning since 4 am. I can upload my files there and access them from anywhere else as long as I have my laptop. I don't keep everything on there, just the projects that I'm currently working on. I prefer external hard drives and pen drives for long term storage.

Personally, I don't think I have any projects that would be interesting enough to hack into.


 

Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 09:20
Member (2003)
Danish to English
+ ...
I do have people's private details... Apr 18, 2013

Medical journals, divorce papers, pre-nuptials, wills... and maybe they are not 100% hacker proof anywhere, but the cloud is an extra place where they might be vulnerable.

There are other ways of taking backups that are at least as convincing, and just as accessible 'on land'.

As long as I don't see any great advantage in the cloud over the system I have, I will not be pressing clients to accept it if they think it is unneccesary too.


 
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