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Poll: How often do you go above and beyond the call of duty in your work?
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff

ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 04:24
SITE STAFF
Aug 19, 2013

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "How often do you go above and beyond the call of duty in your work?".

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dasein_wm  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 13:24
Member (2009)
Italian to English
+ ...
Never Aug 19, 2013

Since providing the best possible quality translation and turnaround time is standard on each job, I don't see how I could unless I was being asked to do more than translate...which I do not.

If the question is asking whether or not I will take a bullet for a client or die trying to meet some outrageous demand, the answer is a resounding NO.



[Edited at 2013-08-19 09:04 GMT]


 

Teresa Borges
Portugal
Local time: 12:24
Member (2007)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
On every job? Aug 19, 2013

I try to deliver the very best translation I can each and every time: is this going above and beyond the call of duty in my work? I wonder…

 

Elizabeth Tamblin  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:24
Member (2012)
French to English
Depends on what is meant by 'above and beyond the call of duty' Aug 19, 2013

My duty is to make each translation as good as I possibly can within the deadline, with due regard to all the issues in the code of conduct I follow. I'm not sure what would constitute going 'above and beyond' this.

 

Thayenga  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 13:24
Member (2009)
English to German
+ ...
Basically never Aug 19, 2013

Doing my very best on each and every single job is all the "above and beyond" I can give.icon_wink.gif

The only time you might say I'm going above is when I inform the client about mistakes in the source text during a genuine proof-reading assignment.

On second thought, I'm doing that anyway with every job, if/where applicable.icon_biggrin.gif


[Edited at 2013-08-19 23:54 GMT]


 

Noni Gilbert  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 13:24
Spanish to English
+ ...
Never and always Aug 19, 2013

Since perfection is what we are striving for, there are numerous cases of little details which don't exactly come under the original job description, but which you'd be stupid not to include. Checking out potential errors you spot in the original would be an example, which you may decide to report on.

And in many cases it is a question of pointing out where some extra work is going to be needed - the client can then decide if anything needs to be done. Sitting on your knowledge of potential problems is never going to be advisable.


 

Julian Holmes  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 21:24
Member (2011)
Japanese to English
Always physically no Aug 19, 2013

Because like Thayenga and Teresa, I give my all when I work for a customer.

If this is not enough for the customer, then their demands and requirements are ever-expanding like the universe, and the they can go shopping elsewhere and save my time.

HTH


 

Łukasz Gos-Furmankiewicz  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 13:24
English to Polish
+ ...
I'd disagree with the logic of one or two of the answers Aug 19, 2013

'When specifically requested,' puts the nonstandard situation within the call of your duty. Which is not exactly a great thing, of course. And when they ask you for a courtesy, then it isn't really 'specifically requested'.

'When absolutely necessary,' is troubling for a similar reason. The alleged absolute necessity puts it within the call of duty.

[Edited at 2013-08-19 15:35 GMT]

Now. I don't believe it's absolutely necessary to give my all, as there's limit to 'my all' other than the deadline, and the deadline still doesn't mean I'll be spending all that time on that particular translation. There are limits. Sometimes I may cross them, even without letting the client or agency know, usually either in this silent fashion or as a courtesy; I make sure, however, that the extra doesn't become the new normal.

So here are some of the limitations when working for an agency, which apply less when I work for a direct client:

– it's not my responsibility to perform extensive research,
– it's not my responsibility to liaise with external experts,
– graphical edition etc. are not my job,
– tech support is not my job,
– fixing the problems of a bad source is not my job,
– changes to the source and requests for change in my translation are a grey area with soft rules, but generally outside the job order.

[Edited at 2013-08-19 15:43 GMT]


 
Post removed: This post was hidden by a moderator or staff member because it was not in line with site rule

Helen Hagon  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:24
Member (2011)
Russian to English
+ ...
What is above and beyond? Aug 19, 2013

As a freelancer, I don't have a contract with a specific job description. If I did, then I would consider anything not included in my contract to be 'above and beyond the call of duty'. However, freelance work for me means doing whatever I feel appropriate, for whoever I consider to be an appropriate customer, according to whichever terms I have negotiated because I feel they are appropriate. Often this involves working very hard at strange hours, but that is my choice, and I can make up for it later by taking time off when things are quieter. There is no black and white line to define what is my duty and what is not.

 

Theo Bernards (X)  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 13:24
English to Dutch
+ ...
Af often as I see fit Aug 19, 2013

Because translation is a means to an end. That end is to ensure that whatever the source text conveys or is supposed to convey (there is often some room for improvement), is also conveyed by the translation - in the same tone of voice, intensity and -if I may say so - intensity. Spelling errors in the source text can unwillingly have an adverse effect to what the writer intends to say, so I always mention them to the client. Like most of us here, I have been active in other industries before I went into translating, and like most of us here, I can and do occasionally spot glaring errors in the reasoning behind some source texts as a result of my familiarity with the content. Again, I wouldn't be much of a business contact for my clients if I let such errors pass without at least mentioning it to them.

 

Theo Bernards (X)  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 13:24
English to Dutch
+ ...
Where is the like button!!! Aug 19, 2013

Mario Chavez wrote:

...

My return question to the poll's creator: What were you thinking when you came up with this poll? Here are some suggested responses:

1. I was bored.
2. I remember WW II and thought the poll would be a good idea.
3. It seemed like a cute question at the time.
4. My mind wanders.
5. My 15-year-old hijacked my keyboard.

We're waiting.


I would have so clicked the "like" or "+1" button if that would be possible ☺


 

Triston Goodwin  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:24
Spanish to English
+ ...
Well... Aug 19, 2013

Considering that we worked on one of the Call of Duty video games, we've moved on to new games with higher player bases and in other genres... Does that count?

 

Mario Chavez (X)  Identity Verified
Local time: 07:24
English to Spanish
+ ...
The art of telling the client about an error Aug 19, 2013

Theo Bernards wrote:

Because translation is a means to an end. That end is to ensure that whatever the source text conveys or is supposed to convey (there is often some room for improvement), is also conveyed by the translation - in the same tone of voice, intensity and -if I may say so - intensity. Spelling errors in the source text can unwillingly have an adverse effect to what the writer intends to say, so I always mention them to the client. Like most of us here, I have been active in other industries before I went into translating, and like most of us here, I can and do occasionally spot glaring errors in the reasoning behind some source texts as a result of my familiarity with the content. Again, I wouldn't be much of a business contact for my clients if I let such errors pass without at least mentioning it to them.


True that, Theo. A big part of my own education was to learn how to tell a client about an error without offending any sensibilities. And Americans are so sensitive and politically correct in corporations.


 

Mario Chavez (X)  Identity Verified
Local time: 07:24
English to Spanish
+ ...
Thanks, Theo! Aug 19, 2013

Theo Bernards wrote:

Mario Chavez wrote:

...

My return question to the poll's creator: What were you thinking when you came up with this poll? Here are some suggested responses:

1. I was bored.
2. I remember WW II and thought the poll would be a good idea.
3. It seemed like a cute question at the time.
4. My mind wanders.
5. My 15-year-old hijacked my keyboard.

We're waiting.


I would have so clicked the "like" or "+1" button if that would be possible ☺


Well, I wish there was a “Tweet if you like it” button. Just in case, feel free to like it on @wordsmeet (my professional Tweet account).

icon_smile.gif


 
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