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Poll: Do you usually charge different rates for different language combinations?
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff

ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 22:01
SITE STAFF
Dec 20, 2013

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "Do you usually charge different rates for different language combinations?".

This poll was originally submitted by Lisa Simpson, MCIL. View the poll results »



 

Marjolein Snippe  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 07:01
Member (2012)
English to Dutch
+ ...
My rates vary... Dec 20, 2013

...with the subject, the level of specialisation, the way the source text is presented (straightforward word document, pdf, powerpoint presentation).

I could probably read and understand the same text equally well in both my source languages, so translation would be similarly easy/difficult/time consuming; therefore the same rate would apply.


 

Chris S  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Swedish to English
+ ...
Yes and no Dec 20, 2013

Not actively - it takes the same time to translate from Swedish, Norwegian and Danish so why would I?

But effectively I do, because I can screw significantly more money out of Norwegian customersicon_smile.gif


 

neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 07:01
Spanish to English
+ ...
Yes Dec 20, 2013

French translators usually want about 20% per cent more than Spanish translators for the same jobs, so if charging 7-8 cents per word for the latter, I'd expect a rate of around 9-10 cents for French.
Although having said that, most (native) French translators I know ask for 11 or 12 cents a word and get quite snippy if offered less.


 

DianeGM  Identity Verified
Local time: 08:01
Member (2006)
Dutch to English
+ ...
Yes ... for translation, not for editing Dec 20, 2013

I work in Dutch to English, Greek to English, Dutch to Greek and English to Greek.
I have a range of rates for translation in each language combination.
I am faster working into English than into Greek mainly due to extra key strokes (accents and grammar considerations).
I charge more for Dutch to Greek than the other language combinations partly for that reason and partly because it is not common, I don't often get requests for it either.
I almost never work English to Greek as I am usually offered those projects at rates that are lower than I am willing to accept.

I charge a flat hourly rate for editing - so that is the same for all my language combinations.


[Edited at 2013-12-20 10:11 GMT]


 

Teresa Borges
Portugal
Local time: 06:01
Member (2007)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Yes Dec 20, 2013

I translate from English, French, Italian and Spanish into European Portuguese. I charge different rates not only for different language combinations but also for different subjects and formats.

Just like Diane, I charge the same flat hourly rate for editing/revision/proofreading whatever the language combination.


 

Reed James
Chile
Local time: 03:01
Spanish to English
+ ...
One combination is enough for me! Dec 20, 2013

I'm quite content translating from Spanish into English exclusively. With all of the regional variations and the thousands upon thousands of words stored in my various glossaries and dictionaries, I've never felt the urge to tack on yet another language pair to my load. I understand that some language pairs do not generate as much work as mine, and consequently it is beneficial to take on more, especially if the source languages are closely related. In any case, if I did translate from more than one language, I would charge the same. I use the same brain and the same computer to translate — regardless of the language.

 

Julian Holmes  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 15:01
Member (2011)
Japanese to English
One trick pony Dec 20, 2013

I just have one language pair, and I go only one way, darlings! icon_biggrin.gif
So, I've never had to anguish over how much I should charge for this and that -- it's a pain enough with just one pair.

I've always wished I had another language under my belt. So I've decided I'm going to start learning Welsh as of January 1st 2014. Maybe in a few years time, I'll be able to add Welsh to Japanese and visa versa to my CV.
In fact, I think this will be soooo minority, I'll be grabbing a completely new niche in the translation market. Hmm Wonder if there'll be any work? icon_confused.gif

At a push and a shove, I could include Osaka (Kansai) dialect > English as an additional language pair. And, believe it or not, I actually did translate a guidebook to south Osaka written completely in Osaka dialect many years ago. Unfortunately, they woudn't let me write the translation in Manchurian. icon_biggrin.gif


 

Chris S  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Swedish to English
+ ...
Welsh Dec 20, 2013

Julian Holmes wrote:
I've always wished I had another language under my belt. So I've decided I'm going to start learning Welsh as of January 1st 2014. Maybe in a few years time, I'll be able to add Welsh to Japanese and visa versa to my CV.
In fact, I think this will be soooo minority, I'll be grabbing a completely new niche in the translation market. Hmm Wonder if there'll be any work? icon_confused.gif


Welsh is a funny one. There is a general perception that any Welsh speaker is automatically qualified to translate to and from English. At a Google Translate level I suppose that's more or less true.

Anyway, there was a bit in the local paper the other week that almost, but not quite, made me write in. The town council have decided that they're paying too much for Welsh translations and are looking for new cheaper suppliers. They are currently paying 5p a word. And that's to an agency. FFS.

Pob lwc felly.


 

Muriel Vasconcellos  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 22:01
Member (2003)
Spanish to English
+ ...
No Dec 20, 2013

I charge the same rate for Spanish and Portuguese source texts. More agencies are unwilling to pay my rate for Spanish than for Portuguese - but that doesn't bother me. I get a kick out of telling agencies that I won't work for their coolie wages.

 

Catharine Cellier-Smart  Identity Verified
Reunion
Local time: 10:01
Member (2010)
French to English
+ ...
Yes Dec 20, 2013

I charge a higher rate for translating Reunion Creole to English for two reasons:

1) Reunion Creole doesn't have a standard recognised writing system so translating it takes longer than my other language combination, French to English. It's more work.

2) I'm one of very very few people to offer this language combination.

Having said that there is obviously less demand for RC>ENG than FR>ENG.


 

ventnai  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 07:01
Member
German to English
+ ...
Virtually stopped working with Spanish Dec 20, 2013

I translated from Spanish to English when I started translating but soon added German. Spanish rates have remained stagnant or even fallen whereas I have managed to increase my rates for German. I work almost exclusively with German now. I like to do some Spanish to keep my hand in but I get few offers these days and usually at awful rates.

 

Ty Kendall  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:01
Hebrew to English
Funny you should say that... Dec 20, 2013

Julian Holmes wrote:
I've always wished I had another language under my belt. So I've decided I'm going to start learning Welsh as of January 1st 2014.


I've been thinking the same but for another reason. I only live about 3 miles from the Welsh border and we have been talking about moving into Wales for a while now and I've always preferred the more heavily Welsh-speaking areas of the north.

Might start watching a bit more S4C and Pobol y Cwm to get my ears accustomed to the sound of it...icon_biggrin.gif


 

Triston Goodwin  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 23:01
Spanish to English
+ ...
Just Spanish for me... Dec 20, 2013

I would love to pick up another language, but I still have a long way to go before with Spanish.

I lived in Germany until I was about 5 years old. I've wanted to try and pick the language back up, but haven't had the time or money to do so. Chinese would be a fun one to learn, but I think that market's even more populated than Spanishicon_smile.gif


 

Adnan Özdemir  Identity Verified
Turkey
Local time: 09:01
Member (2007)
German to Turkish
+ ...
Yes. Dec 20, 2013

I am polyglot...

For example:::

Spanish > Turkish -> 2,5 unit price
German > Turkish -> 2,0 unit price
English > Turkish -> 1,8 unit price.

I translate another languages into Turkish too (e.g. Basque...) but only for meicon_biggrin.gif

.
.
.

Saludos/Selamlar


 
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