Pages in topic:   [1 2] >
Poll: How far do you generally read a text before you start translating it?
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff
ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 05:27
SITE STAFF
Dec 8, 2014

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "How far do you generally read a text before you start translating it?".

View the poll results »



Direct link Reply with quote
 

José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 10:27
English to Portuguese
+ ...
A few random paragraphs Dec 8, 2014

The quantity depends on the overall length, to forestall nasty surprises, e.g. language switches, missing pages, unreadable pages, etc.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 14:27
Spanish to English
+ ...
Other Dec 8, 2014

It depends on the client/text.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Teresa Borges
Portugal
Local time: 13:27
Member (2007)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
It depends! Dec 8, 2014

For a new client: I always read the whole text before starting the translation and sometimes I even underline some passages or words that aren’t clear or are unknown to me.

For my regulars: I don’t! We have been working for a long time and fortunately I have never had any nasty surprises, but for a couple of problems which were easily solved on the spot.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Marjolein Snippe  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 14:27
Member (2012)
English to Dutch
+ ...
scanning Dec 8, 2014

I voted 'the whole text', but I don't really read it all thoroughly; rather, I usually scan through the whole text and read a few paragraphs.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 14:27
Member (2003)
Danish to English
+ ...
Depends Dec 8, 2014

I read the whole of many medical texts - before I even accept the job.

If there is any special terminology or other issues I ask the client, or reject the job if it is more than I can cope with.

These texts are often scanned, 'dead' PDFs, and there may be handwritten sections and all sorts of surprises... which I need to allow time for.

I skim larger texts, and often read them section by section. I prefer to read the text before I translate in earnest, but not necessarily all at once. I note terminology, and it helps with consistency to know how the text is structured etc.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Chris S  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Member (2011)
Swedish to English
+ ...
Life's too short for route planning Dec 8, 2014

I just jump in the car and drive off. I might glance at the map along the way if I really have to, but I'm not keen on asking for directions and I don't do satnav. So sometimes I get lost - and find the most unexpected things.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Julian Holmes  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 21:27
Member (2011)
Japanese to English
Almost none Dec 8, 2014

I absolutely refuse to read all of a 600-page manual before I start to translate it. Contents and Product Description and a few pages at random is enough to get the general drift.

Besides, I prefer Magical MysteryTours!


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Muriel Vasconcellos  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:27
Member (2003)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Other Dec 8, 2014

I will skim part of the text before I accept the job, but once it has been assigned to me, I just plunge in. I have found that the mysteries unravel as I go along. For me, pinpointing them in advance isn't much help.

Direct link Reply with quote
 
Gallagy
Ireland
Local time: 13:27
Member (2010)
French to English
+ ...
Other, it depends Dec 8, 2014

Depends on length/type of text, and whether new/old client.

For new clients I quickly scan a text honing in on a few bits here and there in order to give a quote but I usually only read ahead when the current sentence/paragraph I'm working on is making no sense...

If a text is short I might scan it all.

If it's literary in nature I'll read some random paragraphs to get a sense of the tone and style


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Maxi Schwarz
Local time: 07:27
German to English
+ ...
Other Dec 8, 2014

The material should be scanned in its entirety before accepting the text.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Mario Freitas  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 10:27
Member (2014)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Agree, Chris, Dec 8, 2014

Chris S wrote:

I just jump in the car and drive off. I might glance at the map along the way if I really have to, but I'm not keen on asking for directions and I don't do satnav. So sometimes I get lost - and find the most unexpected things.


I do the same, and I never had any trouble with that.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Thayenga  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 14:27
Member (2009)
English to German
+ ...
It depends Dec 8, 2014

If it's a text from a known client, then I usually start to translate right away since the document almost always follows the same terminology as the previous texts, although there are no identical or nearly identical passages, just being in the same field.

When I receive texts in other fields, I usually scan either the entire or parts of the document.

Since most of my texts are of a more creative nature, I usually just start with the translation. Only in subtitle translations do I read the entire text (box by box only), cutting it to the appropriate length during the translation process.

[Edited at 2014-12-08 15:10 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Julian Holmes  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 21:27
Member (2011)
Japanese to English
One advantage of repeat work from clients Dec 8, 2014

Thayenga wrote:

If it's a text from a known client, then I usually start to translate right away since the document almost always follows the same terminology as the previous texts ....


If you get regular work from the same client, they'll give you the right info when they make the initial inquiry, such as "A sequel to the previous stuff you did" or "A version of such-and-such manual for salesmen or repairmen."

So, no pre-read is required. Works both ways - quick OK back to the client and quick order, and quick immersion in the new job by the translator. Win-win. No mysteries, unfortunately.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Tina Vonhof  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 06:27
Member (2006)
Dutch to English
+ ...
Scan Dec 8, 2014

I scan the whole text quickly to see how long it is, if there any tables or graphs and such, and to make sure it's all legible.

Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pages in topic:   [1 2] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:

Moderator(s) of this forum
Jared Tabor[Call to this topic]

You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Poll: How far do you generally read a text before you start translating it?

Advanced search






BaccS – Business Accounting Software
Modern desktop project management for freelance translators

BaccS makes it easy for translators to manage their projects, schedule tasks, create invoices, and view highly customizable reports. User-friendly, ProZ.com integration, community-driven development – a few reasons BaccS is trusted by translators!

More info »
Protemos translation business management system
Create your account in minutes, and start working! 3-month trial for agencies, and free for freelancers!

The system lets you keep client/vendor database, with contacts and rates, manage projects and assign jobs to vendors, issue invoices, track payments, store and manage project files, generate business reports on turnover profit per client/manager etc.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search