Poll: When editing/proofreading, what kind of feedback do you generally provide to the client?
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff
ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 03:45
SITE STAFF
Dec 14, 2014

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "When editing/proofreading, what kind of feedback do you generally provide to the client?".

This poll was originally submitted by Vladimir Kukharenko. View the poll results »



Direct link Reply with quote
 

Platon Danilov  Identity Verified
Ukraine
Local time: 13:45
Member (2014)
English to Russian
+ ...
I don't accept these jobs Dec 14, 2014

This is not a kind of job I'd like to do.
And as far as I know, it is not quite rewarding.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Mary Worby  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:45
Member
German to English
+ ...
Other Dec 14, 2014

I do what I am asked by the customer, whether it is just a brief statement on overall translation quality or a full review. I have never been asked to produce a report on all my changes, though.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

David Wright  Identity Verified
Austria
Local time: 12:45
German to English
+ ...
Just correct it Dec 14, 2014

Because that's all my proofreading clients want me to do (these are not correction of other translators' work; they are academic articles written in English by non-natives). If my client wants to know why I've made a change, or wants to suggest another alternative, he phones.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 12:45
Spanish to English
+ ...
Other Dec 14, 2014

Depends on the client and job. Most of the revision or post-editing work that I do consists of academic papers written in English by non-native authors, either individually or in groups, which may occasionally be multilingual. Most of the time I simply return the texts when I consider they are fit for publication. If any doubts or queries arise during the process, I send them an e-mail asking for clarification. Occasionally I will mention mistakes or possible improvements to the text, although in general the authors' level is usually quite good.

One exception to the rule is a series of text about henhouse ventilation, some of which I still have to deliver to the author. I'm going to have to have a word with him, as the quality of his text was so poor that even after extensive revision and post-editing it still leaves a lot to be desired, but as I say, this is an exceptional case.

PS: More often than not, I have to ask them to supply specific parts of the text in Spanish so that I can understand what they are saying ( I would have no trouble translating these texts from Spanish to English, but the authors or their departments cannot usually afford the fees). For example, I have just had to ask one author to send me the first sentence of his paper in Spanish, as I'm not sure exactly what he is trying to say in English. This happens quite a lot - the problem is not the complexity or recondite nature of the content, but the non-native nature of the English it is written in.

[Edited at 2014-12-14 10:52 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Thayenga  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 12:45
Member (2009)
English to German
+ ...
Other Dec 14, 2014

If the quality of the translation is good or "pretty" good, or the client didn't leave any special instructions, then I only include a note in my email to my client.

If the translation is of excellent quality, I'm always happy to include a compliment for the translator in my email.

If required by the client, I add brief notes within the tags/track changes.

And last but not least, for one client I write a brief report.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
LilianNekipelov  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 06:45
Russian to English
+ ...
Technically, you are not even supposed to change anything as an editor Dec 14, 2014

only suggest changes that the translator has to either accept or reject. The translator is the copy right holder--to his or hers translation. An editor is not really supposed to express any personal opinions about anything--just suggest the changes. Some unfortunately, sometimes not knowing what they have been doing-- start changing perfect sentences into nonsense to their likes, and thinking that the more they change the better they would appear as editors. The only criterion for changing anything should be improving the quality of the text, not anything else, but it hardly ever is.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Muriel Vasconcellos  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 03:45
Member (2003)
Spanish to English
+ ...
A combination Dec 14, 2014

While this is not my favorite kind of work, I do sometimes accept articles or documents written by non-native speakers. I'm doing one right now which is a doozie.

If I find an error, I highlight my solution and query it in a comment balloon. I also use a comment balloon to call attention to a major change or to ask if my solution is correct when I'm in doubt. But I try to keep my comments and queries to a minimum. Clients usually don't want to be bothered, especially if the comments make the author look incompetent.

I used to occasionally review translations. I would never comment on the quality of a colleague's work unless he/she was being considered for a permanent position and I was asked to do so.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

M. Anna Kańduła  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:45
English to Polish
Depends Dec 14, 2014

Whether the client wants a detailed report (they usually include a form for that) or just fix mistakes.

Direct link Reply with quote
 
Jose Arnoldo Rodriguez-Carrington  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 05:45
English to Spanish
+ ...
Only comments where necessary Dec 14, 2014

Muriel Vasconcellos wrote:

If I find an error, I highlight my solution and query it in a comment balloon. I also use a comment balloon to call attention to a major change or to ask if my solution is correct when I'm in doubt. But I try to keep my comments and queries to a minimum. Clients usually don't want to be bothered, especially if the comments make the author look incompetent.




That's what the client wants (at least that's what I have been asked to do, nothing more)


Direct link Reply with quote
 
564354352  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 12:45
Danish to English
+ ...
Corrections, but using track changes Dec 14, 2014

David Wright wrote:
Just correct it
Because that's all my proofreading clients want me to do (these are not correction of other translators' work; they are academic articles written in English by non-natives). If my client wants to know why I've made a change, or wants to suggest another alternative, he phones.


This could be my line exactly. (I can practically hear the 'shock horror' from native English speakers now...)

The only difference is that I always deliver such texts with all changes visible, so that the author can go through them if he/she wants to. For direct clients, I would normally forward the text in two versions, i.e. one with changes tracked and any doubts or queries added in text bubbles, and another version with changes accepted, and only comments left in bubbles.

I don't undertake proofreading of other translators' work. I did enough of that when I was an in-house employee at a translation agency, and I loathed it. So when I went self-employed, I just decided that proofreading translations would not be one of the services I offer.

[Edited at 2014-12-14 16:00 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Triston Goodwin  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 04:45
Spanish to English
+ ...
General comments Dec 14, 2014

I help fix a lot of video game texts, usually written by developers. My job is to make the English sound like English

If there was a translator involved, I try to find something positive to mention in my notes.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

JaneTranslates  Identity Verified
Puerto Rico
Local time: 06:45
Member (2005)
Spanish to English
+ ...
I don't make changes. Dec 14, 2014

Like Lilian, I don't make any changes. I use Word's marginal "Comment" feature and suggest changes, often explaining why the change needs to be made. Then I leave it to the author (or client) to enter the changes they want.

The result is that my regular clients are learning! Their writing is improving.

Of course, I'll make changes (but always with "track changes") if that's what the client explicitly requests.

Jane


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Volodymyr Kukharenko
Ukraine
Local time: 13:45
Member (2009)
English to Ukrainian
+ ...
I send ChangeTracker reports with the edited files Dec 15, 2014

After editing, I compare the translated files with ChangeTracker (www.change-tracker.com), export the comparison results into Excel, and include it into the delivery package. It takes just a minute or two, but adds value for the customer. E.g. they can send the corrections report to the translator.

Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:

Moderator(s) of this forum
Jared Tabor[Call to this topic]

You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Poll: When editing/proofreading, what kind of feedback do you generally provide to the client?

Advanced search






SDL MultiTerm 2017
Guarantee a unified, consistent and high-quality translation with terminology software by the industry leaders.

SDL MultiTerm 2017 allows translators to create one central location to store and manage multilingual terminology, and with SDL MultiTerm Extract 2017 you can automatically create term lists from your existing documentation to save time.

More info »
SDL Trados Studio 2017 Freelance
The leading translation software used by over 250,000 translators.

SDL Trados Studio 2017 helps translators increase translation productivity whilst ensuring quality. Combining translation memory, terminology management and machine translation in one simple and easy-to-use environment.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search