Poll: How many times do you proofread your translation before submitting it?
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff

ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 11:27
SITE STAFF
Apr 16, 2015

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "How many times do you proofread your translation before submitting it?".

This poll was originally submitted by Milena Taylor. View the poll results »



 

Teresa Borges
Portugal
Local time: 19:27
Member (2007)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Other! Apr 16, 2015

Depends! From one to three or more...

 

Chris S  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Swedish to English
+ ...
I don't Apr 16, 2015

I don't proofread my translations before delivering them

I do check them before delivery though

And I may proofread them once they've been through layout

#pedantsRus


 

Elizabeth Joy Pitt de Morales  Identity Verified
Local time: 20:27
Member (2007)
Spanish to English
+ ...
It depends Apr 16, 2015

Teresa Borges wrote:

Depends! From one to three or more...


Absolutely agree. I'm currently translating a book and am now on the third proofreading. I expect to do it at least once more when I get the pdf file with the layout, but I suspect I will want to check one final time to make sure any changes arising from that proofreading are implemented.

Standard translations get one or two, usually, but I have a couple of clients who personally do a very thorough job of proofreading and then send the translation back for my input. In this case, I leave the proofreading to them.


 

Tim Drayton  Identity Verified
Cyprus
Local time: 21:27
Turkish to English
+ ...
Three or more times ... Apr 16, 2015

... was what I said, in that I have a working process whereby I re-read each sentence and work it into shape before moving on, do the same after I finish each paragraph, do the same after I finish each section and also read the whole thing through, making any necessary final changes, after I have finished. With me, reviewing is interwoven into the whole translation process.

Actually, nowadays and with much more experience, I rarely need to make much in the way of changes when I read the whole thing through at the end.

[Edited at 2015-04-16 11:02 GMT]


 

James A. Walsh
Spain
Local time: 20:27
Member
Spanish to English
+ ...
3+ times Apr 16, 2015

Tim Drayton wrote:

...I have a working process whereby I re-read each sentence and work it into shape before moving on, do the same after I finish each paragraph, do the same after I finish each section and also read the whole thing through, making any necessary final changes, after I have finished. With me, reviewing is interwoven into the whole translation process.

Actually, nowadays and with much more experience, I rarely need to make much in the need of changes when I read the whole thing through at the end.


Pretty much identical to my working process.


 

Muriel Vasconcellos  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 11:27
Member (2003)
Spanish to English
+ ...
At least twice Apr 16, 2015

As I work along, I highlight the passages that I think are perfect in green. Then I proofread them and discover that they are far from perfect. Once the corrections have been made, I highlight everything in teal. In my final reading, I clear out the teal highlighting and often find that more changes still have to be made.

The system gets a little tricky when the client also has highlights in the text. I have ways for working around that.

I'm a visual person, and the colors are a quick reminder of where I stand and what still needs to be done. I also get a feeling of satisfaction when I can "wrap up" a piece of work in a bright color.


 

José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 16:27
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Ditto - It depends Apr 16, 2015

Teresa Borges wrote:

Depends! From one to three or more...


While I strive to use quality assurance during all processes, i.e. constantly check & fix everything I do, the number of checks will vary considerably depending on the entire job setup.

If the client has teamed me up with a known and reliable colleague to proofread, which happens relatively often I won't go much beyond spellchecking. Now and then these folks write or Skype-text me privately saying "Found nothing to fix/change/improve; I put a couple of cosmetic changes there just to reassure the PM that I read it thoroughly. Reject any you don't like."

On sworn translations, I'll be liable for the accuracy, so I thoroughly check them both before and after printing. Sometimes a mistake that eludes me on the screen will be clear as daylight when it hits the paper.

Video subtitling is a completely linear process, so QA all the way is a most sensible guideline. Any flaw detected will force me back to the very spot where it was created. For instance, if one mistake on the subtitles is detected only on the fully-authored DVD, I most go back to the timespotting/reviewing step, fix it, and then burn the subtitles again (takes time), and re-author the DVD (takes time). If after all this has been redone another mistake is found, the process must be repeated entirely. So every effort in reviewing subtitles thoroughly at every step is fully justified.

Each case, each setting will be different.


 

Michael Harris  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 20:27
Member (2006)
German to English
Other Apr 16, 2015

I do not read through a whole translation again as these are more than 100 pages long in some cases.

But I always run a QA and if the program permits, I also run it through XBench.

That normally sorts out any problems and is pretty helpful.


 

neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 20:27
Spanish to English
+ ...
Other Apr 16, 2015

It depends. For example, I just sent off a translation or a regular client; with these texts, I check each segment as I go along and when I finish translating, I read through it one or twice to tweak anything that i think needs it. With other texts I might ask a third party to check the text for me to see what their feedback is. And my degree of familiarity with other texts means that a quick once-over at the end is enough.

 

neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 20:27
Spanish to English
+ ...
Books are different Apr 16, 2015

Elizabeth Joy Pitt de Morales wrote:

Teresa Borges wrote:

Depends! From one to three or more...


Absolutely agree. I'm currently translating a book and am now on the third proofreading. ...



Unlike the bulk of my translation work, books are a different kettle of fish. I tend to go over each section or chapter as soon as it is translated, before moving on to the next bit....


 

Maxi Schwarz
Local time: 13:27
German to English
+ ...
two-stage with a top-up Apr 16, 2015

I proofread once for language and once for translation which reflects the twin set of criteria put out by the ATIO. So I check once that my into English translations sound like they were written in English originally rather than "sounding foreign". And I check under the microscope that nothing is missing from the original, and more broadly that entire paragraphs sound correct. One can take away from the other so I might go back and forth more than once. I.e. style can compromise detail of meaning; detail of meaning can compromise style.

I also invite end clients to look through the translation. Certified translations must go out in hard copy form, so I make sure that they have looked at the electronic version before it's "written in stone" so to say in print.


 

Sheila Wilson  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 19:27
Member (2007)
English
+ ...
I chose twice as being an average Apr 16, 2015

However, I do some quite critical work that needs multiple reviews, checking not just for errors but for better synonyms etc. And I work on property descriptions written by owners where the poorly-paid translation is always likely to be better than the original. The first gets as many reviews as necessary; the second gets one. Of course, both are spell-checked too.

 

Michael Wetzel  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 20:27
German to English
two rounds of editing plus one proofreading Apr 17, 2015

(1) translate entire text
(2) check segment (= CAT segment) by segment for accuracy, completeness, and style
(3) check target-only primarily for style
(4) proofread (in the general sense of the word) = only check for typos, formatting, etc.

Terminological research is split pretty evenly among step 1 and 2. Step 1 and 2 take up probably at least around 75% of my time.

Published material usually involves a brief stage of (literal) proof reading after step 4.


 

Rolf Kern  Identity Verified
Switzerland
Local time: 20:27
English to German
+ ...
Once Apr 17, 2015

And then I put it through the speller as the second round. In most cases, there is no time left for a second proofreading. I do not use any CAT tool.

 


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