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Poll: What is the maximum number of words you've translated in 24 hours?
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff
ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 12:57
SITE STAFF
May 23, 2015

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "What is the maximum number of words you've translated in 24 hours?".

This poll was originally submitted by Milena Taylor. View the poll results »



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David Wright  Identity Verified
Austria
Local time: 21:57
German to English
+ ...
Other May 23, 2015

I honestly don't have the faintest idea.

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Teresa Borges
Portugal
Local time: 20:57
Member (2007)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Other May 23, 2015

It depends entirely on the benchmark! Do you mean translate and type? Do you mean working with a TM? Does copy and paste count? I consider 3,000 words per day quite feasible and a comfortable task, revision included, and I know that now and then I’ve done more than that but I didn’t care to count. I’m not exactly interested on going to the Guinness World Records…

http://www.proz.com/forum/poll_discussion/257830-poll_what_is_the_maximum_number_of_words_that_youve_translated_in_a_day-page2.html

[Edited at 2015-05-23 08:57 GMT]


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Billh
Local time: 20:57
Spanish to English
+ ...
I consider 10,000 words May 23, 2015

to be a normal 8-hour day's work, but have topped 20,000 over 24 hours.

[Edited at 2015-05-23 17:43 GMT]


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Julian Holmes  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 05:57
Member (2011)
Japanese to English
About 12,000 in 5 hours May 23, 2015

It was for a machine tool that I was very familiar with and the Japanese was pretty much a doddle.

I used to be a very fast typist (until I buggered up my right right hand). On this particular job, I was in good form and bashed out several pages of source text all to do with the X axis which turned into about 20 pages of English (@200 words per page) and then found that the next two sections were exactly the same but for the Y and Z axes.

I proofed what I'd already done to make sure that everything was OK, did a couple of copy and pastes and find and replaces and - hey presto! - the translation literally tripled in an instant.

This was about 20 odd years ago. Aaaah, the good ol' days before the advent of CATs! You could bill the customer for total word counts without discounts for repetitions. And, the rates were that much higher then! Holmsey went home very satisfied that day.

Do I get a cigar and bragging rights for this one?


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Yetta J Bogarde  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 21:57
Member (2012)
English to Danish
+ ...
4,500 once May 23, 2015

and although it was familiar territory (pharma) I was totally wasted afterwards.

Normally 2,000 words +/- a few, is plenty for a day's work.

[Edited at 2015-05-23 10:57 GMT]


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Rolf Kern  Identity Verified
Switzerland
Local time: 21:57
English to German
+ ...
Other May 23, 2015

How should or could I know.

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Mónica Algazi  Identity Verified
Uruguay
Local time: 17:57
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
Hmmm May 23, 2015

Does this really matter? Are we robots, by any chance?


[Edited at 2015-05-23 14:32 GMT]


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Mario Chavez  Identity Verified
Local time: 15:57
English to Spanish
+ ...
Domo arigato May 23, 2015

Mónica Algazi wrote:

Does this really matter? Are we robots, by any chance?


[Edited at 2015-05-23 14:32 GMT]


I don't think that was the intent of the poll, having answered similarly worded ones in the last 2 years here.

Although I'm a proponent of translate slowly (patent pending), sometimes I find myself in the need to break that rule of mine. Why? Customer's particular needs.

About 45-60 days ago, I was involved in a large civil engineering project with documents to translate in a week. The wordcount for each document ranged 36,000-50,000. That required translating 5,000-7,000 words a day. Long 14-16 hour days.

I know myself pretty well, and I can handle these bursts of “productivity” on occasion, but not every single day. I would burn out.


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José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 18:57
English to Portuguese
+ ...
10,000 in one day, twice so far... May 23, 2015

... however I couldn't do it for two days in a row. I was 100% familiar with the content, NO research necessary, though the number of repetitions was under 5%, and there were no fuzzy matches.

My rated daily average output is 3,000 words.


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Annamaria Amik  Identity Verified
Local time: 22:57
Romanian to English
+ ...
Why so offended? May 23, 2015

I really don't understand why people get so offended or unnerved about questions like this. It's just a poll question, someone was curious. Most of the poll questions are, technically speaking, irrelevant anyway, aren't they?

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Mario Chavez  Identity Verified
Local time: 15:57
English to Spanish
+ ...
And the pendulum swings... May 23, 2015

Annamaria Amik wrote:

I really don't understand why people get so offended or unnerved about questions like this. It's just a poll question, someone was curious. Most of the poll questions are, technically speaking, irrelevant anyway, aren't they?



I wouldn't use extremes to qualify the poll questions in general or the responses to them. Sometimes the intent is transparent on both cases, sometimes is not. We need to be aware of that.

Some friends I have in the profession, like Angus, Julian and Muriel, sometimes start a poll question that I find compelling and interesting. So, I wouldn't call their questions irrelevant.

Other colleagues whom I don't know also posit thoughtful questions.

Sure, there are those who formulate poll questions that sound clunky or illogical, That's human nature.

If you want to understand why people get “offended or unnerved,” ask your own question and listen. Don't dismiss them offhand.


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xxxbrg
Netherlands
7,500 May 23, 2015

A newsletter, in a domain I was entirely familiar with.

Double quality control included.

--Slept the whole day afterwards.


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Luiz Barucke
Brazil
Local time: 18:57
Member (2013)
Spanish to Portuguese
+ ...
8000 max. / 4000 generally May 23, 2015

I'm understanding 24 hours here as from a day until another, not 24 working hours.

It varies a lot depending on the job complexity. I have already spent about 18 hours (3 days) translating a 6000-word magazine article on archeology. Each sentence needed some research to be sure.

But with a simple text about a training on information security, I've translated the whole batch with 8k words during one work day.

Generally, I translate about 4k per day... Not on archeology, of course


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Yaotl Altan  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 14:57
Member (2006)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Right May 23, 2015

Mónica Algazi wrote:

Does this really matter? Are we robots, by any chance?


[Edited at 2015-05-23 14:32 GMT]


If we translate fast, then the probability of mistakes increases significantly.

I try to negotiate on projects whose wordcounts demand more than 4,000 words a day or +12 translation hour days. Usually, they accept to change the deadline; if they reject my proposal, I reject their projects.

I need to sleep no less than 6 hours, to do 2 hours of exercises and time to eat, read and doing other things.


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