Pages in topic:   [1 2] >
Poll: Do you prefer to use a specific type or layout of keyboard?
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff
ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 07:02
SITE STAFF
Feb 7, 2016

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "Do you prefer to use a specific type or layout of keyboard?".

This poll was originally submitted by Julian Holmes. View the poll results »



Direct link Reply with quote
 

EvaVer  Identity Verified
Local time: 16:02
Member (2012)
Czech to English
+ ...
Well, of course, Feb 7, 2016

or have I misunderstood the question? I learned a QWERTY keyboard (in fact, a QWERTZ keyboard, but this is a minor difference - I just switch automatically to QWERTY in my head when writing in French - on a Canadian French keyboard), I couldn't use an AZERTY one, not to speak of other layouts, still more "exotic" to me. Or do you mean the layout just of special characters? Even there, everybody is used to his or hers. Every time I replace my computer, it is a bit different and it takes some time and a lot of my nerves to get used to it. On my notebook, I cannot find out how to make an "ù" - instead of the separate accent, I have an "à" and an "è".

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Teresa Borges
Portugal
Local time: 15:02
Member (2007)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
AZERTY Feb 7, 2016

I learned typing on a manual typewriter (that was a few decades ago) with an AZERTY layout and that’s the one I have been using since…

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:02
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
QWERTY and equivalent Feb 7, 2016

I always use a QWERTY keyboard for Latin-letter languages. I don't like the Cyrillic keyboard used by Russians, and found one on the web based on the QWERTY. I later produced what I thought was an improvement on this, using Keyboard Manager, and have been using that for several years now. It works on later versions of Windows, I have just installed it on a Windows 10 laptop. I have a folder of the relevant files, which I am willing to supply to anyone interested.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Thayenga  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 16:02
Member (2009)
English to German
+ ...
Of course Feb 7, 2016

I'm using the ergonomic keyboard from Microsoft. It's great working with it.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Chie. I  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 00:02
Partial member (2013)
English to Japanese
+ ...
pantographs are great Feb 7, 2016

It is least likely to hurt my fingers because it does not need a hard hit to press keys.

They are usually onboard on laptops,
but less often or not as good ones for desktops.

I wish I could get a good one for desktop myself.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Julian Holmes  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 00:02
Member (2011)
Japanese to English
Yes Feb 7, 2016

One with a long space bar. You may be thinking.

When typing in Japanese text, there is no concept of 'spaces' between words since all Kanji characters and hiragana/katakana syllabary are typed into continuous 'kaku' or squares and punctuation marks each take up an individual kaku. So, basically there really is very little need for a space bar on a keyboard used in Japan (input of English is an afterthought), which means that space bars are extremely short on keyboards here - maybe the length of two keys at most even though Japanese keyboards (made in Japan for Japanese language input) are QWERTY. Whereas keyboards made outside of Japan for input of English or romance languages have a space bar that is about three times longer.
So, yours truly really has to hunt around to find a decent keyboard that can be used for efficiently typing in English as well as Japanese. The last time I found one I liked and could use, I bought eight(!).

So, in conclusion, the type of keyboard and layout/arrangement of keys, etc. really does depend on your language pair. So, I was curious how your language requirements affect your choice of this piece of hardware.

This is why I probably posted this question - quite some time ago since I can't actually recollect when and why.

I hope my explanation above sheds some light on the rationale behind what might appear to be a very, very simple question.

And, thanks to all that have replied so far.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Mario Freitas  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 13:02
Member (2014)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Of course, Feb 7, 2016

And I think those who answered "no" did not really think of their ranswer or do not really know how many different kinds of keyboards there are. Take one of these people who answered "no" and use a standard US QWERTY, and give them a FR AZERTY to work with, and they'll change their answer to "yes" in a glimpse.
... and the intelligent questions are still going to the recycle bin.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Luiz Barucke
Brazil
Local time: 13:02
Member (2013)
Spanish to Portuguese
+ ...
Yes... Feb 7, 2016

...and it changed my life

I have 3 keyboards from a same - simple but comfortable - model: one installed on my desktop, another to use when I work outside with my laptop, and a 3rd one in my 2nd address (I have residence in 2 countries).

As they have exactly the same design, my fingers move "alone", just like they do with a guitar


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Julian Holmes  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 00:02
Member (2011)
Japanese to English
Nice comment Feb 7, 2016

Luiz Barucke wrote:

As they have exactly the same design, my fingers move "alone", just like they do with a guitar


Thank you.

I've found that my hands and fingers 'remember' where keys are placed and move exactly how I want them to dance over the keyboard. If I'm asked to work on a customer's keyboard for even a short time, I've found that I have to relearn key layouts and typing till I've mastered a different keyboard takes at least 2x the time and makes translation an ordeal. This is especially so since I can use only two fingers, to be precise my thumb and index finger, on my right hand. A keyboard that fits my typing still is an absolute must!

BTW, I still play the guitar but fingerpicking it out of the question. My translations, nevertheless, are 'fingerpicking good!'


Direct link Reply with quote
 

DZiW
Ukraine
English to Russian
+ ...
"pyramid" Feb 7, 2016

Yes, I'd prefer a silent A-type anti-RSI keyboard.

Direct link Reply with quote
 
564354352  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 16:02
Danish to English
+ ...
Curves are good Feb 7, 2016

I love my Logitech K350 with its subtle curves that make it perfect for a 'lady of traditional build' (see The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency if you don't understand this reference). It is amazing what a difference it makes that the keys curve slightly to either side - this is a much more natural and comfortable position for me to work in.

Obviously, I prefer a keyboard that has the three Danish letters æ, ø and å in addition to the standard QWERTY layout.

I don't like typing on my laptop keyboard at all. I hate the flat surface and the tiny keys, which is why I use a separate wireless keyboard with a useful place to rest my wrists...


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Sophie Dzhygir  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 16:02
Member (2007)
German to French
+ ...
Short space bars Feb 7, 2016

Julian, thank you for telling about the Japanese space bar. I didn't know such a difference existed and thus I never questionned this, but now that I've read your post, I'm asking myself: why the hell do we need such a long space bar? I mean, now we're used to it, we have a feeling we couldn't do without, but really, what's the reason why we couldn't do with just a shorter one like the Japanese?

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Mario Chavez  Identity Verified
Local time: 10:02
English to Spanish
+ ...
Keyboards and language Feb 7, 2016

The QWERTY design in most Western keyboards is the triumph of marketing, not better design and ergonomics. That distinction belongs to the Dvorak design. Some niche keyboard makers sell Dvorak keyboards but, as you can imagine, they're expensive.

My native language is Spanish, so you'd think I use a keyboard with a Spanish mapping layout. No, I don't. Yes, I learned to touch type on typewriters with the Spanish layout, but that was eons ago, last century. After years of using the English layout (US English International, mind you) for 15 years, I found it very hard and uncomfortable to switch to a Spanish layout.

I had those Microsoft ergonomic keyboards, the first of which used to sell for $100 (dollars) back in 1994. Mac computers had split keyboards that I found quite ergonomic but had no equivalent for Windows machines.

After years of using ergonomic-styled plastic keyboards from the likes of Logitech, Microsoft and others, I decided to go a step up. The one I have, the MaxKeyboard Nighthawk X8 is very sturdy, with well-built keys, each with its own mechanical spring mechanism that gives your fingers appropriate feedback for typing. Unlike the hollow feedback from flat, plastic, cheap keyboards.

The Nighthawk's layout is straight, not curved, and my wrists don't feel any pain or discomfort. Retail price? $125-$150.

Now I'm looking for an Apple keyboard.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 16:02
Spanish to English
+ ...
Yes Feb 7, 2016

The one I always use...it's a QWERTY. It actually needs a good clean...

Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pages in topic:   [1 2] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:

Moderator(s) of this forum
Jared Tabor[Call to this topic]

You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Poll: Do you prefer to use a specific type or layout of keyboard?

Advanced search






CafeTran Espresso
You've never met a CAT tool this clever!

Translate faster & easier, using a sophisticated CAT tool built by a translator / developer. Accept jobs from clients who use SDL Trados, MemoQ, Wordfast & major CAT tools. Download and start using CafeTran Espresso -- for free

More info »
TM-Town
Manage your TMs and Terms ... and boost your translation business

Are you ready for something fresh in the industry? TM-Town is a unique new site for you -- the freelance translator -- to store, manage and share translation memories (TMs) and glossaries...and potentially meet new clients on the basis of your prior work.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search