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Poll: As a sworn translator, have you ever been asked to stamp translations made by others?
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff
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Mar 23, 2016

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "As a sworn translator, have you ever been asked to stamp translations made by others?".

This poll was originally submitted by Susana E. Cano Méndez. View the poll results »



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Doan Quang  Identity Verified
Vietnam
Local time: 13:56
Member
English to Vietnamese
Am I a sworn translator? Mar 23, 2016

I sign for a statement certifying translations are accurate to the best of my knowledge and stamp to be affixed by a Notary Public.

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Susana E. Cano Méndez  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 08:56
Member
French to Spanish
+ ...
You are Mar 23, 2016

Doan, you are if this is official in your country.

I have passed an exam in Spain, after which I have been granted a Sworn Translator diploma; but in other countries, such as France (if I'm not wrong), there is no need to pass an exam, you only have to apply for it and got the authorization.

Usually, a sworn translator translates the document *and* certifies this translation. But in Spain, sometimes the agencies ask a translator to do a "simple translation" and then ask a sworn translator to certify it (to reduce costs, I assume).

I never certify a translation I have not done myself, because this leads (or might lead) to do a full revision of the translation, almost for peanuts and always in a hurry.

But I'm curious about this.


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neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 08:56
Spanish to English
+ ...
No, am not a sworn translator Mar 23, 2016

However, I know this is common practice among some colleagues in Spain. As long as the translation is faithful to the original and of an acceptable standard, I don't really see anything wrong with it. Often the request for an "offical" or stamped translation is an anachronistic throwback to earlier times IMHO.

Many years ago I did a couple of translations (at normal basic rates) for a Spanish "traductor jurado" who was also a university professor, until I found out that he was getting his students to translate his texts for him as part of their coursework/homework, then billing his clients as if he had done the translations himself. I don't know if any other translator colleagues are still working with that guy, but I dropped him like a hot potato.


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Doan Quang  Identity Verified
Vietnam
Local time: 13:56
Member
English to Vietnamese
In Vietnam Mar 23, 2016

What I usually do is to take hard copies of translations, a statement of accuracy together with a notarised copy of my translation degree to a Notary Public office and of course I have to pay for stamping services

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Susana E. Cano Méndez  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 08:56
Member
French to Spanish
+ ...
Sworn translators Mar 23, 2016

neilmac wrote:

However, I know this is common practice among some colleagues in Spain. As long as the translation is faithful to the original and of an acceptable standard, I don't really see anything wrong with it. Often the request for an "offical" or stamped translation is an anachronistic throwback to earlier times IMHO.

Many years ago I did a couple of translations (at normal basic rates) for a Spanish "traductor jurado" who was also a university professor, until I found out that he was getting his students to translate his texts for him as part of their coursework/homework, then billing his clients as if he had done the translations himself. I don't know if any other translator colleagues are still working with that guy, but I dropped him like a hot potato.


Hello neilmac, I don't think it's a "wrong" way of doing things, but rather a quick one. But I don't see the point of it: either you stamp the translation without a full revision (you get quick money but who knows about the quality, and a sworn translator have accountability too); either you do a full revision (sometimes it is not worth the money you get; you are going to sign and stamp: it's a responsibility).

About this teacher, well... his attitude defines him.

In Spain we are hoping that digital certification will come sooner than later, too. This is an important feature that will ease our work.

[Edited at 2016-03-23 09:07 GMT]


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Susana E. Cano Méndez  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 08:56
Member
French to Spanish
+ ...
Notary Mar 23, 2016

Doan Quang wrote:

What I usually do is to take hard copies of translations, a statement of accuracy together with a notarised copy of my translation degree to a Notary Public office and of course I have to pay for stamping services


So you pay for the Notary's stamp on the translation and you get paid for the whole work (translation and Notary's stamp)?


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Teresa Borges
Portugal
Local time: 07:56
Member (2007)
English to Portuguese
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I'm no longer a sworn translator, Mar 23, 2016

but when I was (from 1986 until 2010) I was asked quite often to stamp translations done by others and I always refused (as far as I know in Belgium is forbidden).

P.S. In Portugal, unlike other countries, there are no sworn translators as such. To certify a translation, so that a translated document is legally valid, it is necessary to make its certification at the organisations empowered to do so (namely Notary’s Offices and Attorneys).


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Chris S  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Member (2011)
Swedish to English
+ ...
No Mar 23, 2016

Not sworn but quite sweary at times

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Doan Quang  Identity Verified
Vietnam
Local time: 13:56
Member
English to Vietnamese
out-of-pocket expenses Mar 23, 2016

Susana E. Cano Méndez wrote:

So you pay for the Notary's stamp on the translation and you get paid for the whole work (translation and Notary's stamp)?


I get paid for translation on word-count basis and stamping, DHL services are treated as out-of-pocket expenses which shall be reimbursed by clients. Such receipts shall be attached to my invoice and I recently stopped providing this kind of service.


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Susana E. Cano Méndez  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 08:56
Member
French to Spanish
+ ...
Yes Mar 23, 2016

Doan Quang wrote:

Susana E. Cano Méndez wrote:

So you pay for the Notary's stamp on the translation and you get paid for the whole work (translation and Notary's stamp)?


I get paid for translation on word-count basis and stamping, DHL services are treated as out-of-pocket expenses which shall be reimbursed by clients. Such receipts shall be attached to my invoice and I recently stopped providing this kind of service.



I understand.


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Susana E. Cano Méndez  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 08:56
Member
French to Spanish
+ ...
Teresa Mar 23, 2016

Teresa Borges wrote:

but when I was (from 1986 until 2010) I was asked quite often to stamp translations done by others and I always refused (as far as I know in Belgium is forbidden).

P.S. In Portugal, unlike other countries, there are no sworn translators as such. To certify a translation, so that a translated document is legally valid, it is necessary to make its certification at the organisations empowered to do so (namely Notary’s Offices and Attorneys).


Thank you for the info, Teresa.


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Helen Hagon  Identity Verified
Local time: 07:56
Member (2011)
Russian to English
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Certified translation in UK Mar 23, 2016

I was recently asked if I would certify a translation in a language pair which I don't have. I said no, and offered some contact details for other translators and agencies who might be able to help. However, there is no such thing as a sworn translator in the UK, and the rules concerning certified translations are hazy at best. In theory, I wouldn't have a problem with thoroughly checking another translator's work in my own language pair, and then signing a document to say it was 'accurate to the best of my knowledge', if I thought it was correct, and if that met the requirements of the organisation in question.

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Parrot  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 08:56
Member (2002)
Spanish to English
+ ...
I have a partner Mar 23, 2016

... who asks me to do her into-English sworn stuff, which she checks. She always indicates when this is the case so I can do the seals.

If the document is for internal use in English-speaking countries, the Notary Public/Commissioner of Oaths is usually the solution.

Sworn translations are used in documents passing through diplomatic channels. That's why consulates can do the equivalent certification. The Spanish office certifying translators is under Foreign Affairs. It's actually not a court requirement for criminal cases at present.

[Edited at 2016-03-23 10:37 GMT]


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Susana E. Cano Méndez  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 08:56
Member
French to Spanish
+ ...
Helen Mar 23, 2016

Helen Hagon wrote:

I was recently asked if I would certify a translation in a language pair which I don't have. I said no, and offered some contact details for other translators and agencies who might be able to help. However, there is no such thing as a sworn translator in the UK, and the rules concerning certified translations are hazy at best. In theory, I wouldn't have a problem with thoroughly checking another translator's work in my own language pair, and then signing a document to say it was 'accurate to the best of my knowledge', if I thought it was correct, and if that met the requirements of the organisation in question.


Interesting.
In Spain, the exam is quite hard.
The ways of certifying and stamping are very specific, too.


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