Poll: Which layout do you prefer when using CAT tools?
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff

ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 19:44
SITE STAFF
Jun 12, 2016

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "Which layout do you prefer when using CAT tools?".

View the poll results »



 

EvaVer  Identity Verified
Local time: 04:44
Member (2012)
Czech to English
+ ...
Vertical, Jun 12, 2016

I didn't know any other layout was possible, but I wouldn't use it anyway.

 

neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 04:44
Spanish to English
+ ...
Horizontal Jun 12, 2016

Because I use WF Classic, and I'm used to it. Anything else feels uncomfortable initially. I've used Deja Vu a couple of times and I suppose I could get used to it if I really had (or wanted) to.

 

Anton Konashenok  Identity Verified
Czech Republic
Local time: 04:44
English to Russian
+ ...
I don't like grid-based CAT tools. Jun 12, 2016

To me, the best CAT tool is the one that plugs into the editor I'm using (e.g. MS Word) and does text segmentation on the fly rather than when the file is opened. This is why I am still using Trados 2007.

If I have to use a grid-based CAT tool for whatever reason, I will use the layout that takes less time and less eye strain to switch between source and target. Which one, depends on other details of the user interface.

[Edited at 2016-06-12 10:22 GMT]


 

C. Mouton  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 04:44
Member (2007)
English to French
it depends on the tool Jun 12, 2016

The display is different according to the CAT tool you use.

 

Julian Holmes  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 11:44
Member (2011)
Japanese to English
Side-by-side Jun 12, 2016

Why is this called "vertical" icon_confused.gif Makes more sense to call it "side-by-side."

Once again, a poll that excludes all those who don't use CAT tools. Even though CAT tools are a must for technical translators such as myself, it is not a sine qua non for translators in lots of other fields and genres.

I recently got a couple of new customers who both insist on me using different tools. I am using Memsource Editor right now on a new job and will have to use MemoQ sometime in the near future.
Strange to get these requests within the short space of a week - I've been using Trados since it came out all those years back and have never been asked to use anything else.

[Edited at 2016-06-13 07:45 GMT]


 

Mario Freitas  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 00:44
Member (2014)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Vertical (not my choince, really) Jun 12, 2016

I actually got used to the vertical grid, since all CATs I tried were preconfigured as such by default, and I didn't know how to change it. Then the same thing happened with online platforms - all vertical, and some don't even allow you to change that.

So I worked on vertical grids for some time until I found out it was possible to switch it. I said "let's try this", as it looked more obvious to me, but it was too late. I was already used to the vertical grid.

Later, I was looking for a second or wider screen, and I realized people use screens side-by-side, not one on top of the other, and the market offers ultra-wide screens, but not ultra-high screens. So I figured side-by-side is a widespread standard.

I still wonder if it wouldn't be more logical to the human brain to use the horizontal grid, though.


 

Luiz Barucke
Brazil
Local time: 00:44
Member (2013)
Spanish to Portuguese
+ ...
Horizontal Jun 12, 2016

I find source segment above target much more intuitive than side by side. Before, Trados used to offer this view, but only working on Word.

Now, Wordfast (until v. 3) is the only CAT which offers "text" view (in addition to a "table" view). That's why WF Pro 3 is my preferred CAT.


 

Anton Konashenok  Identity Verified
Czech Republic
Local time: 04:44
English to Russian
+ ...
to Mario Jun 12, 2016

market offers ultra-wide screens, but not ultra-high screens.

There are quite a few pivoting monitors on the market, and some of them would even automatically switch your display into portrait configuration once you rotate them into vertical position.

I still wonder if it wouldn't be more logical to the human brain to use the horizontal grid, though.

The question is mostly about eye strain rather than brain logic. All other things being equal, the shorter distance your eye has to travel, the better, but having a high-contrast grid line helps. So, generally speaking, a stacked arrangement ("horizontal" in this poll) is less eye-straining than side-by-side ("vertical"), but it also depends on the visual features of the grid.


 

Mario Freitas  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 00:44
Member (2014)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
@ Anton Jun 12, 2016

Anton Konashenok wrote:

There are quite a few pivoting monitors on the market, and some of them would even automatically switch your display into portrait configuration once you rotate them into vertical position.

...

The question is mostly about eye strain rather than brain logic. All other things being equal, the shorter distance your eye has to travel, the better, but having a high-contrast grid line helps. So, generally speaking, a stacked arrangement ("horizontal" in this poll) is less eye-straining than side-by-side ("vertical"), but it also depends on the visual features of the grid.


1. True, but since I chose an ultrawide screen, it would look pretty weird and unbalanced to place it in vertical position. It would probably fall down very easily, and force me to move, not my eyes up and down, but my neck, which makes it unfeasible. I have never seen anyone using a wide screen in the inverted position or two monitors setup one on top of the other instead of side-by-side.

2. Also true, but, as mentioned above, the wide screen does not force you to move your neck, only your eyes, to the sides. The "high screen", on the other hand, would necessarily force you to move your head up and down - an undue effort, ergonomically speaking, and a sure cause for headaches and other pains.

[Edited at 2016-06-12 21:31 GMT]


 

Teresa Borges
Portugal
Local time: 03:44
Member (2007)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Finally... Jun 12, 2016

Julian Holmes wrote:

Once again, a poll that excludes all those who don't use CAT tools.


... somebody is thinking about us poor souls, who don’t work with CAT tools either vertically or horizontally! Thanks, Julian!

P.S. I did use a CAT tool with a horizontal layout when I was working in-house…


 

Mario Chavez (X)  Identity Verified
Local time: 22:44
English to Spanish
+ ...
Reminder of tools past Jun 12, 2016

Anton Konashenok wrote:

To me, the best CAT tool is the one that plugs into the editor I'm using (e.g. MS Word) and does text segmentation on the fly rather than when the file is opened. This is why I am still using Trados 2007.

If I have to use a grid-based CAT tool for whatever reason, I will use the layout that takes less time and less eye strain to switch between source and target. Which one, depends on other details of the user interface.

[Edited at 2016-06-12 10:22 GMT]


I remember using a tool (was it Trados 2007 or another one? I can't recall) that acted as a plug-in for MS Word. I did not like it whenever I was working with complex-format Word documents containing small text boxes with graphics, for example. There was simply no room to view the English text up while translating in the lower box.

Wow, I had forgotten about that experience!

icon_biggrin.gif


 

Mario Chavez (X)  Identity Verified
Local time: 22:44
English to Spanish
+ ...
Eye strain Jun 12, 2016

Anton Konashenok wrote:

market offers ultra-wide screens, but not ultra-high screens.

There are quite a few pivoting monitors on the market, and some of them would even automatically switch your display into portrait configuration once you rotate them into vertical position.

I still wonder if it wouldn't be more logical to the human brain to use the horizontal grid, though.

The question is mostly about eye strain rather than brain logic. All other things being equal, the shorter distance your eye has to travel, the better, but having a high-contrast grid line helps. So, generally speaking, a stacked arrangement ("horizontal" in this poll) is less eye-straining than side-by-side ("vertical"), but it also depends on the visual features of the grid.


Most modern LED or flat-screen monitors allow for 180-degree pivoting, a useful feature for certain applications.

I agree with Anton: it has nothing to do with the so-called logic of the human brain but with eye strain. The ideal distance between the eyes and the screen is about 10-18 inches (yes, guys, I've read factual articles about it). Eye strain is a real occupational hazard.

In my case, I prefer the side-by-side configuration: source language to the left, target language to the right. That way, my eyes don't have to travel a long distance between segments.

By the way, does anyone know about saccades? Eye movement in reading is not a smooth running of the eyeball across a page, as we might think.


 

Ana Vozone  Identity Verified
Local time: 03:44
Member (2010)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Horizontal! Jun 12, 2016

I use Trados 7 on ALL my jobs except when clients specifically ask me to use Studio.

Trados 7 (only) has the horizontal view which I think makes life so much easier than the vertical view.

The other CAT tool I use is WordBee, which I think only has the vertical layout.


 

Anton Konashenok  Identity Verified
Czech Republic
Local time: 04:44
English to Russian
+ ...
Monitors on top of each other Jun 13, 2016

I have never seen anyone using a wide screen in the inverted position or two monitors setup one on top of the other instead of side-by-side.

In fact, I use two monitors on top of each other. The top one is considerably bigger (24" vs. 15" of my laptop) but is 30-40 cm farther away from me. I came to this configuration empirically and like it a lot: on the one hand, the eye travel between the screens is minimized, but on the other, switching between the screens requires me to change eye accommodation (focal distance). The former avoids excessive eye strain and makes my work faster, and the latter provides the direly needed exercise for ciliary muscles of the eyes (which tend to get really sore when you keep your eyes focused at the same distance for hours on end).


 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:

Moderator(s) of this forum
Jared Tabor[Call to this topic]

You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Poll: Which layout do you prefer when using CAT tools?

Advanced search






SDL Trados Studio 2019 Freelance
The leading translation software used by over 250,000 translators.

SDL Trados Studio 2019 has evolved to bring translators a brand new experience. Designed with user experience at its core, Studio 2019 transforms how new users get up and running and helps experienced users make the most of the powerful features.

More info »
Anycount & Translation Office 3000
Translation Office 3000

Translation Office 3000 is an advanced accounting tool for freelance translators and small agencies. TO3000 easily and seamlessly integrates with the business life of professional freelance translators.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search