Pages in topic:   [1 2] >
Poll: Do you pay taxes in your country of residence?
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff

ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 22:54
SITE STAFF
Jun 15, 2016

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "Do you pay taxes in your country of residence?".

View the poll results »



 

Michael Harris  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 07:54
Member (2006)
German to English
Reluctantly Jun 15, 2016

but yes.

I would not mind paying the taxes if I did not see how it is being wasted on stupid political projects that no one is responsible about.
Good example:
BER - international airport that is being built and should be openig in 2012 - oh, it is 2016 and oh, when should we open it? Oh come on, lets chosse 2019, sounds good, or maybe after spending 3billion Euros, we´ll tear it down and build another one!!!! (that is a serious suggestion from politicians in Berlin)

Never mind, cant do anything about it so just live with it......


 

Teresa Borges
Portugal
Local time: 06:54
Member (2007)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Of course I do! Jun 15, 2016

One has to... If anyone is interested in moving to Portugal: http://www.doingbusiness.org/data/exploreeconomies/portugal/paying-taxes/

 

svenfrade  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 07:54
French to German
+ ...
Yes, of course Jun 15, 2016

I'm not rich so I don't have a whole bunch of possibilities at to evade taxes. Apparently there are many ways in Germany to do that legally, but, alas, only for the rich.

I don't mind paying taxes as such, it is certainly necessary. It's just that I fail to see the fairness in the current system (and the unwillingness to do anything about it) that annoys me and I'm seriously considering leaving this country. (Hope this little rant wasn't too political...)


 

xxxIlan Rubin  Identity Verified
Russian Federation
Local time: 08:54
Russian to English
Yes Jun 15, 2016

In Russia we only pay 13% income tax.

On the other hand we pay huge import duties on cars...partially offset by the cheap petrol of course...then again the health service is s**t so you have to go private


 

Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 07:54
Member (2003)
Danish to English
+ ...
Anyone else over 70%? Jun 15, 2016

You can bet I pay taxes!!

I am in the position that as a self-employed person married to a pensioner, I am obliged to support him too. So if I earn more than a certain amount, he loses supplements to his pension, and in effect I pay well over 70% of income above that level. Even below the magic limit, I pay over 50% of my earnings - Denmark claims to be the country with the world's heaviest taxes. After that, there is 25% VAT on absolutely everything you buy in the shops.

We do have welfare, free hospitals and a reasonable infrastructure, but millions (or billions of Kroner at 7.45 to the Euro) are thrown away on trains that will never run, more trains that do not stop anywhere passengers might be able to get on them, and other projects that are hard to justify. Not to mention administration for the sake of administration and beaureaucracy.

Next year I am planning to stay below the limit of what I can earn as a pensioner myself before we both lose supplements. While there is a lot of talk of encouraging the older generation to keep working, and threats of raising the pension age to 70 and above, there is absolutely no incentive to take it seriously! Pension age is going back to 67 from 65, and I am in between - and in fact entitled to stop working any time.


 

EvaVer  Identity Verified
Local time: 07:54
Member (2012)
Czech to English
+ ...
How can anyone not to? Jun 15, 2016

Except if you live in a tax haven. I understand the question as "do you pay them there or in another country", which shouldn't be possible under the normal rules (more than 183 days in the country during the year, or country where you spend more time than in any other country - which, to my simple mind, seems to be the definition of "country of residence"). I would like to see explanations from people who answered "no".

 

Nikki Scott-Despaigne  Identity Verified
Local time: 07:54
French to English
Wow! Jun 15, 2016

Christine Andersen wrote:

You can bet I pay taxes!!

I am in the position that as a self-employed person married to a pensioner, I am obliged to support him too. So if I earn more than a certain amount, he loses supplements to his pension, and in effect I pay well over 70% of income above that level. Even below the magic limit, I pay over 50% of my earnings - Denmark claims to be the country with the world's heaviest taxes. After that, there is 25% VAT on absolutely everything you buy in the shops.

We do have welfare, free hospitals and a reasonable infrastructure, but millions (or billions of Kroner at 7.45 to the Euro) are thrown away on trains that will never run, more trains that do not stop anywhere passengers might be able to get on them, and other projects that are hard to justify. Not to mention administration for the sake of administration and beaureaucracy.

Next year I am planning to stay below the limit of what I can earn as a pensioner myself before we both lose supplements. While there is a lot of talk of encouraging the older generation to keep working, and threats of raising the pension age to 70 and above, there is absolutely no incentive to take it seriously! Pension age is going back to 67 from 65, and I am in between - and in fact entitled to stop working any time.


That's a heavy rate of charge! The services which are "free" are not really free at all, ever. And yes, it pays to keep an eye on various limits and thresholds. Sometimes earning more leaves you with less in your pocket. However, I suppose - and hope - that when you need to rely upon those services, they are of good quality and reliable.


 

Nikki Scott-Despaigne  Identity Verified
Local time: 07:54
French to English
Does this mean "income tax"? Jun 15, 2016

EvaVer wrote:

Except if you live in a tax haven. I understand the question as "do you pay them there or in another country", which shouldn't be possible under the normal rules (more than 183 days in the country during the year, or country where you spend more time than in any other country - which, to my simple mind, seems to be the definition of "country of residence"). I would like to see explanations from people who answered "no".


If the question means "income tax", tax on revenue, - earnings etc, then some people may not earn enough to have to pay (income/revenue) tax. Around half the population of France does not earn enough to pay income tax. Scary.

However, if the question uses the term "tax" more generally, whether or not earnings/revenue are above the limit, there are all sorts of other taxes : residency tax, land tax, inheritance tax, "fortune" tax (in France for those who have assets worth a certain amount), etc. Reading the term more widely still, then health, retirement/pension, road tax, social security contributions also come into play.

My question in return is : what does the question mean by "tax"?

ALso, I have taken "country of residence" to mean the one where I normally live most of the year. "Country of residence" is defined differently according to where you live and I bet its most important definition is the one for tax purposes, wherever you live !


[Edited at 2016-06-15 10:11 GMT]


 

Parrot  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 07:54
Member
Spanish to English
+ ...
This has got to be a trick question Jun 15, 2016

You mean I have a choice?icon_razz.gif

 

Philippe Etienne  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 07:54
Member
English to French
Biased results Jun 15, 2016

People not paying tax in their country of residence will not report it to avoid being tracked down by the tax-man.

Paying tax means earning money and working legally. I'm happy to pay (a fair amount of) tax for the common good. I'm less happy when tax rates mean near-confiscation of your hard earned money or more waste.

Philippe

[Edited at 2016-06-15 10:30 GMT]


 

Chris S  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Swedish to English
+ ...
No Jun 15, 2016

I could get political and say I live in Wales but pay taxes to England, the land of hooligans

I could moan about how much I pay and how it is then wasted by self-serving paedophilic idiots

But then I'd get censored under rule 682(5)(e)

And anyway I firmly believe in the welfare state and paying all the taxes you should


 

Michael Harris  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 07:54
Member (2006)
German to English
Taxes Jun 15, 2016

Chris S wrote:

I could get political and say I live in Wales but pay taxes to England, the land of hooligans

I could moan about how much I pay and how it is then wasted by self-serving paedophilic idiots

But then I'd get censored under rule 682(5)(e)

And anyway I firmly believe in the welfare state and paying all the taxes you should


I dont mind paying them either, it is just the wasting going that really annoys me
Oh heck, I should have gotten into politics


 

Michael Harris  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 07:54
Member (2006)
German to English
Not quite true Jun 15, 2016

svenfrade wrote:

I'm not rich so I don't have a whole bunch of possibilities at to evade taxes. Apparently there are many ways in Germany to do that legally, but, alas, only for the rich.


You do not have to be rich to trick legally in Germany, you just need a good accountant.
And if you do not earn more than a certain amount then you also fall below the have to pay limit.


 

Georgie Scott  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 07:54
Member (2009)
French to English
+ ...
Dual residency Jun 15, 2016

I think I have dual residency and currently pay taxes in both countries... I'm sure I'll be told I'm "doing it wrong" but I know a few other people in the same position and it "seems legit". I definitely fill out three tax returns (2 in the UK, 1 in France), two of which mention the other country I'm resident in.

 
Pages in topic:   [1 2] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:

Moderator(s) of this forum
Jared Tabor[Call to this topic]

You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Poll: Do you pay taxes in your country of residence?

Advanced search






memoQ translator pro
Kilgray's memoQ is the world's fastest developing integrated localization & translation environment rendering you more productive and efficient.

With our advanced file filters, unlimited language and advanced file support, memoQ translator pro has been designed for translators and reviewers who work on their own, with other translators or in team-based translation projects.

More info »
SDL MultiTerm 2017
Guarantee a unified, consistent and high-quality translation with terminology software by the industry leaders.

SDL MultiTerm 2017 allows translators to create one central location to store and manage multilingual terminology, and with SDL MultiTerm Extract 2017 you can automatically create term lists from your existing documentation to save time.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search