Pages in topic:   [1 2] >
Poll: Do you use term extraction tools?
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff
ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 20:47
SITE STAFF
Jun 29, 2016

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "Do you use term extraction tools?".

This poll was originally submitted by Mahmoud Basal. View the poll results »



Direct link Reply with quote
 

neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 05:47
Spanish to English
+ ...
Other Jun 29, 2016

I don't think so. In fact, I'm not really sure what a term extraction tool is. Obviously, it's a tool for extracting terms, but that's as far as I go.

Direct link Reply with quote
 
Maxi Schwarz
Local time: 22:47
German to English
+ ...
What is it? Jun 29, 2016

What is a "term extraction tool"?

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Chris S  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Swedish to English
+ ...
No Jun 29, 2016

Makes me think of sitting in the dentist's chair...

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Edith van der Have-Raats  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 05:47
Member (2016)
English to Dutch
+ ...
Déjà Vu has a Lexicon tool ... Jun 29, 2016

... with which one can chop up the text into small parts and then browse through them, add translations of recurring terminology and add that to the glossary for the project. I assume that's the type of thing you are referring to here? If so: yes, I use that occasionally.

And LOL @ Chris


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Anton Konashenok  Identity Verified
Czech Republic
Local time: 05:47
English to Russian
+ ...
No Jun 29, 2016

I don't even use glossaries - never felt the need to write down what I can simply memorize.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Julian Holmes  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 13:47
Member (2011)
Japanese to English
No Jun 29, 2016

If you can't remember a few terms in the source language and their equivalents in the target language, then you're in the wrong business.

Isn't this question directed at PMs or people at clients/customers in charge of putting termbases together, i.e. not translators?

For Chris
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bOtMizMQ6oM

or

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XB7R0ZxNgC4


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Kirsten Bodart  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:47
Dutch to English
+ ...
Why would it be only for PMs? Jun 29, 2016

I don't use it, as I've tried it in MemoQ and you get so many false positives (in English texts 'and' for example, because it gets repeated so often in one text or project) that it's not worth the work. You end up only accepting a tenth of all the terms proposed by the tool.

IAs if that's not enough, the term extraction usually doesn't contain the terms that might be handy for years to come, because they only cropped up once in your translation.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Mario Chavez  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:47
English to Spanish
+ ...
Term extraction sounds painful Jun 29, 2016

Remember the old dental drill buzz? I once saw an old model (my dentist was treating me for a cavity). The drill looked like a smaller Dremel!



Software companies in the so-called translation industry trip over each other trying to sell useless tools such as term extraction tools.

“What? No way!” you'd say. I do use translation memories, I do build termbases in Déjà Vu X3 but I stay away from other automatic tools as they aren't worth the trouble. In fact, I feel they add to the problem of poorly written translations.

Imagine the word bottle translated into your language; in Spanish, it would be botella. Not bad for a bottle of wine, a bottle of water, etc. But what about a bottle of propane gas? A certain MT vendor I shan't name (it starts with an S and ends with an N) apparently processed a document for an oil & gas company and rendered propane bottle as (you guessed it) “botella de propano”, which is never used in Latin America.

I might as well use Adobe's Latin text filling tool. Lorem ipsum anyone?

[Edited at 2016-06-29 10:48 GMT]

[Edited at 2016-06-29 10:49 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Philippe Etienne  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 05:47
Member
English to French
No Jun 29, 2016

because I work with agencies only.

Kirsten Bodart wrote:
I don't use it, as I've tried it in MemoQ and you get so many false positives (in English texts 'and' for example, because it gets repeated so often in one text or project) that it's not worth the work. You end up only accepting a tenth of all the terms proposed by the tool.

IAs if that's not enough, the term extraction usually doesn't contain the terms that might be handy for years to come, because they only cropped up once in your translation.

I didn't try the MemoQ thing, but it's basically my opinion.

From what I've experienced from toying around with Multiterm Extract/PhraseFinder or whatever SDL used to call them, I gather they may be helpful on large projects with ample deadlines and direct contact with an end customer: you create a glossary with recurring words and expressions of major importance before starting translation and submit it to the end customer for review and approval.

Then you have a reliable glossary before actually starting the translation, which can be handy to avoid post-translation term changes and time-wasting.

But these tools often require a lot of manual checking/validating, so I'd say that below 100kwords, there is little point spending time on term extraction, and on-the-fly termbase-populating (how'sthat?) is usually the most time-effective and reliable method.

You can also use them to build glossaries from legacy material, like TMs or bilingual docs, where candidate target terms are also extracted and matched to source. With the same limitations.

To me it's mainly a tool for agencies or the proverbial "terminologists", but I understand that software companies want freelance translators to believe that it saves them time.

Philippe


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Doan Quang  Identity Verified
Vietnam
Local time: 11:47
Member
English to Vietnamese
What is it? Jun 29, 2016

Maxi Schwarz wrote:

What is a "term extraction tool"?


What is it?


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Edith van der Have-Raats  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 05:47
Member (2016)
English to Dutch
+ ...
A termbase is also useful for translators Jun 29, 2016

Julian Holmes wrote:

If you can't remember a few terms in the source language and their equivalents in the target language, then you're in the wrong business.

This is not only about the capability to remember stuff (though even that may be hard, if you want to keep terminology in a large translation assignment consistent), but it will make translation in your favourite CAT-tool quicker. Just type the first letter of the word, press enter, and there it is. I like glossaries a lot, and they tend to safe me quite a lot of time. Therefore, I do spend time and effort to make my own. Term extraction is one way to do that, but usually, I just select source and target text and add the combination directly to the glossary while translating.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Julian Holmes  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 13:47
Member (2011)
Japanese to English
Yes but Jun 29, 2016

Edith van der Have-Raats wrote:

Julian Holmes wrote:

If you can't remember a few terms in the source language and their equivalents in the target language, then you're in the wrong business.


This is not only about the capability to remember stuff (though even that may be hard, if you want to keep terminology in a large translation assignment consistent), but it will make translation in your favourite CAT-tool quicker. Just type the first letter of the word, press enter, and there it is. I like glossaries a lot, and they tend to safe me quite a lot of time. Therefore, I do spend time and effort to make my own. Term extraction is one way to do that, but usually, I just select source and target text and add the combination directly to the glossary while translating.


Some clarification is needed here.

I use termbases as well and I, too, find them useful. However, a translator would know and be able to judge which terms are needed in the termbase, and hand-pick and compile his or her own list of the most relevant terms based on his/her own preferences - without having to resort to a term extraction tool.

Whereas, these extraction tools most probably use algorithms based on statistics such as frequency of occurrence, etc. to automatically extract terms which cannot take relevance and/or importance for the translator into consideration. This is why I mentioned that they probably are for PMs and customers who do the preparations for projects and not the actual translation.

I do agree, though, that an auto-suggestion dictionary coupled with a termbase is very helpful.

Added "without having to resort to a term extraction tool."

[Edited at 2016-06-29 13:40 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Chris S  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Swedish to English
+ ...
:-O Jun 29, 2016



You're too kind


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Julian Holmes  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 13:47
Member (2011)
Japanese to English
You're welcome Jun 29, 2016

Chris S wrote:



You're too kind


One of my favorite films. Feed me!


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pages in topic:   [1 2] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:

Moderator(s) of this forum
Jared Tabor[Call to this topic]

You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Poll: Do you use term extraction tools?

Advanced search






Wordfast Pro
Translation Memory Software for Any Platform

Exclusive discount for ProZ.com users! Save over 13% when purchasing Wordfast Pro through ProZ.com. Wordfast is the world's #1 provider of platform-independent Translation Memory software. Consistently ranked the most user-friendly and highest value

More info »
CafeTran Espresso
You've never met a CAT tool this clever!

Translate faster & easier, using a sophisticated CAT tool built by a translator / developer. Accept jobs from clients who use SDL Trados, MemoQ, Wordfast & major CAT tools. Download and start using CafeTran Espresso -- for free

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search