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Poll: Do you inform potential clients you may not work with them if they have a low Blue Board score?
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff
ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 07:00
SITE STAFF
Aug 26, 2016

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "Do you inform potential clients you may not work with them if they have a low Blue Board score?".

This poll was originally submitted by Jenn Mercer. View the poll results »



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Teresa Borges
Portugal
Local time: 15:00
Member (2007)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Other Aug 26, 2016

If a potential client has a low Blue Board score, I won't work with them, sometimes I'll tell them why...

[Edited at 2016-08-26 08:20 GMT]


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Michael Harris  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 16:00
Member (2006)
German to English
No Aug 26, 2016

And why should I bother telling / informing them?

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neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 16:00
Spanish to English
+ ...
Other Aug 26, 2016

In general, I tend not to work with agencies if I can help it.

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Julian Holmes  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 00:00
Member (2011)
Japanese to English
I don't check the Blue Board Aug 26, 2016

Because it has very little relevance to translation agencies and LSPs based in Japan.

We do things differently over here. And, most Japanese customers are law-abiding citizens.


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Chris S  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Swedish to English
+ ...
No Aug 26, 2016

I would hope my clients have never heard of it

I've never used it either


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Post removed: This post was hidden by a moderator or staff member for the following reason: Requested by user.

Jenny Forbes  Identity Verified
Local time: 15:00
Member (2006)
French to English
+ ...
Only if ... Aug 26, 2016

I'd point out an agency's bad Blue Board record only if an agency hitherto unknown to me contacted me and, before replying, I checked their BB record (which I always do) and found it was bad.

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ventnai  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 16:00
Member
German to English
+ ...
Depends Aug 26, 2016

Depends on the mood and the day, but most likely I won't even respond to an offer of work from a low-rated agency. I may send a sarcastic note if an agency offers me pitiful rates, though.

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xxxIlan Rubin  Identity Verified
Russian Federation
Local time: 18:00
Russian to English
Advance payment Aug 26, 2016

Unless they are rated very close to 5 I tell them I require advance payment, and explain why. As of now none has agreed to this so I haven't worked for them as a result but who knows.

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José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 13:00
English to Portuguese
+ ...
I have a risk management policy Aug 26, 2016

I recently realized that having been a human resources manager led me to have policies covering most everything in business.

Translation requires work before payment, and it's not a commodity. If I do a translation for ABC Corp. and, for any reason, they change their mind while the job is under way, I can't sell it to XYZ Corp. nor anybody else. It will be scrap.

Likewise, while ABC Corp. may have read comments on my translation work for other clients, they can't be 100% sure of the quality and timeliness of my delivery until they see it.

I have a pretty good track record as a translator. If the client has an equally good record as a payer, okay, we'll swap my work for their money when time comes.

If the client has NO record, like many individuals who approach me out of the blue with an occasional translation job, I have my arbitrary unsecured credit limit: BRL 500 (~USD 165 now). If the total amount is below that limit, I'll take the risk. If it's above that, I explain to them that we must share the risk: 50% up-front. Scammers scram; goodwill customers pay immediately.

If the client has a BAD record on the Blue Board, the same rule applies, with a lower threshold: BRL 200 (~USD 65 now). I'll give them ONE chance within that limit. If the total order value is higher, I'll demand 100% up front.


Two cases.

Once I took a chance on a client who had ONE WWA=1 entry. It was not a translation company, they were in the entertainment industry. As I ascertained later, that entry - which they were unaware of - was the result of a new external vendor having re-outsourced the job to someone who delivered completely useless work, and late, therefore not deserving nor receiving any pay. For a couple of years, while a humongous project lasted, it was by far the most profitable client I had.


Now I have a case under way. A translation agency that is sinking in the Blue Board mud. They were a WWA=5 once, now their WWA is going from an overall high 3 to a 12-mos. low 1.

They had tried to hire me several times in the past, but were unlucky. They always did so when I was loaded above the lid. Finally, last month, I did a first $30-ish proofreading job for them. We agreed on COD payment, so they wouldn't waste money on hefty Brazilian interest rates (abt. 17% monthly).

They didn't pay, said they were used to pay in 30 days. Okay, I'll wait till then. However I'm ready to add one more nail to their coffin, I mean, another WWA=1 to their Blue Board record next week.

Quite frankly, $33? In spite of credit cards, think I never left home in the USA (where they are located) carrying less than $50 in cash.

Ever since, I've already turned down two jobs they offered me. No point in growing a delinquent bill. Nevertheless, answering the OP question, if they first settle their pending debt and then pay me 100% in advance, I'll certainly work for them, any time.


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Kuochoe Nikoi  Identity Verified
Ghana
Local time: 15:00
Japanese to English
Only once Aug 26, 2016

I signed up with an agency when their BB was still somewhat okay. By the time they actually contacted me for a job their record was truly abysmal, a long string of 1s with new ones being added every month. There seemed to be zero chance of me getting any money for working with them, so I turned them down with an explanation, they said they understand and that was the end of that.

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Erik Hansson  Identity Verified
Germany
Member (2002)
Swedish
+ ...
Why should I? Aug 26, 2016

I fail to understand why I should inform them. If they are well-organised they surely know that they are on Blue Board, and also know about their score.

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Mario Freitas  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 13:00
Member (2014)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Professional practices II Aug 26, 2016

That wouldn't be very professional. If a potential client has a score below 4.7 in the BB or no record at all there, you give them a polite excuse and flee. But telling them "Hey, I'm not working for you because you're no good" is not very professional or very smart, is it?

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Chris S  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Swedish to English
+ ...
??? Aug 26, 2016

Mario Freitas wrote:

That wouldn't be very professional. If a potential client has a score below 4.7 in the BB or no record at all there, you give them a polite excuse and flee. But telling them "Hey, I'm not working for you because you're no good" is not very professional or very smart, is it?


Why not?

Surely telling them why you won't work with them is the decent thing to do?


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